ACRSN

News

The ACRSN is always keen to hear about events or activities (e.g. performances, book launches, exhibitions) that may be of interest to other scholars in the field of classical reception studies. Please e-mail (info@acrsn.org) or tweet (@ACRSN_org) details to the ACRSN web co-ordinators. An archive of past news and events is available here.

November 2019: Prof. Marguerite Johnson [marguerite.johnson@newcastle.edu.au] from The University of Newcastle, NSW is coordinating an Australasian 'take over' of the CRSN blog (https://classicalreception.org/blog/) for a little while. She would like to hear from colleagues, postgrads and undergrads and those active in Classical Reception Studies with an Australasian twist to contact her with a view to contributing a blog to the ‘take over.’ The idea is to show the CR activity going on in our neck of the woods. Contributors may signal activities, current research and publications, career progression, ideological struggles, potential difficulties in, say, 'getting work out there,' institutional support, etc... Ideas could also include a collective postgrad blog outlining research activities at a particular university, or new courses on CR.

October 2019: two new books of interest for Australasian classical reception studies:

Antipodean Antiquities: Classical Reception Down Under - edited by Marguerite Johnson (University of Newcastle, NSW), Bloomsbury Studies in Classical Reception, 2019: "Leading and emerging, early career scholars in Classical Reception Studies come together in this volume to explore the under-represented area of the Australasian Classical Tradition. They interrogate the interactions between Mediterranean Antiquity and the antipodean worlds of New Zealand and Australia through the lenses of literature, film, theatre and fine art."
Antipodean Antiquities cover

Classical Allusions - poems by John Davidson (Victoria University Wellington), Steele Roberts, 2019: "John Davidson retells myths and historical events (sometimes to highlight a modern concern or controversy), reinvents mythical or historical individuals, and now and then enjoys shameless forays into fantasy."
Classical Allusions cover