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Conferences

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An archive of conferences and previous calls for papers is available here



August 2019

POSTCLASSICISMS WORKSHOP: COMPARATIVE GLOBAL ANTIQUITY

Yale-NUS, Singapore: August 2-4, 2019

In this gathering, we’ll be thinking about three conceptual and methodological keywords: “comparative,” “global,” and “antiquity.” The disciplines of comparative literature, linguistics, history, politics, religion (which is different from comparative theology) are long established fields. Almost all written cultures of the world have a period that they designate “antiquity,” along with a canon of received or discovered texts that are called “classics.” (Or do they?)Traditional scholarship largely studies the various national and historical languages within circumscribed disciplinary boundaries. In recent decades, however, particularly in the field of classical reception, scholars have begun to scholars have begun to integrate comparative approaches in the construction of antiquity and the understanding of “classics” or the “classical.”

We are foregrounding comparison as an activity, methodology, mode of thinking, a way of dealing with differences and similarities in the ancient world. Indeed, our terminology of “classics” or “ancient” or “antique” already presupposes a dialectical opposing term, whether it be “medieval,” “modern,” “vernacular,” or even “baroque” or “romantic” (and these are period styles from European literary history. Other fields will have their own). For example, does the use of “classical” in itself denote the kind of value judgement about certain periods of the past that is more overt in the term “ancient”? In what way does global comparisons elide or ignore those traditions that are primary oral or non-textual? What are the promises and perils of a global study of antiquity?

In short, what is the common denominator, or commensurability of comparison? The term commensurable has its historical roots in mathematics. For the ancient Greeks, who had not recognized irrational numbers, the dimensions of certain mathematical objects were found to lack a common unit of measurement. Are there artifacts and concepts and phenomena from antiquity that are simply incommensurable to us, to each other, and therefore irrational, or beyond our categories of cognition? How do we account for diversity or even universals?

This workshop builds on the momentum of several projects: at Princeton, the Postclassicisms Network, headed by Brooke Holmes, and the Comparative Antiquity Initiative, headed by Martin Kern; and the global study of ancient worlds at Yale-NUS (Andrew Hui and Mira Seo). Taken together, we aim to transform the research and study of comparative antiquity, broadly conceived at Yale-NUS and Princeton, in hopes of providing a model for similar changes elsewhere.

Confirmed participants:
Liu Chen (Yale-NUS)
Katie Cruz (Princeton)
Tom Davies (Princeton)
Gavin Flood (Oxford and Yale-NUS)
Johannes Haubold (Princeton)
Brooke Holmes (Princeton)
Andrew Hui (Yale-NUS)
Martin Kern (Princeton)
Vincent Lee (Yale-NUS)
Jinyu Liu (Depauw and Shanghai Normal University)
Nicholas Lua (Yale-NUS)
Federico Marcon (Princeton)
Dan-el Padilla Peralta (Princeton)
Lisa Raphals (UC Riverside)
Marina Rustow (Princeton)
Mira Seo (Yale-NUS)
Thu Truong (Yale-NUS)
Matthew Walker (Yale-NUS)
Zhuming Yao (Princeton)

Website: https://www.postclassicisms.org/workshops/forthcoming-2/comparative-global-antiquity/

 

 

ANNIVERSARIES, CELEBRATIONS AND COMMEMORATIONS IN THE ANCIENT WORLD, AND THEIR RECEPTION

Annual Unisa Classics Colloquium. Pretoria, South Africa: August 15-18, 2019.

The conference aims to explore issues marking celebrations, commemorations and anniversaries of all kinds around the ancient world (up to the 7th century CE, but including its reception in later periods). Topics enlarging on the social and political significance of such events in the building of not only civic identities but also individual legacies, as well as the appropriation of these occasions in later contexts, will be welcome. The aim is not only to explore literary and material evidence which relates to the social and historical aspects, but also to examine the function and meaning of fictional celebrations and commemorations in genres such as epic, drama or the novel.

Confirmed Keynote Speakers are:
Ian Rutherford, University of Reading
Rebecca Benefiel, Washington & Lee University

Paper proposals (approximately 300 words) are invited for papers of 30 minutes debating current issues and problems on any aspect of the above theme.

Abstracts and titles should include your name and university affiliation, and should be submitted to either:
• Liana Lamprecht at lamprjc@unisa.ac.za
• Martine De Marre at dmarrmea@gmail.com

Deadline for abstracts: 30 April, 2019 extended deadline 30 June, 2019.

Details of the conference venue, accommodation and other important information will be made available on the conference website, which we hope to have up-and-running soon.

Call: [pdf] http://www.casa-kvsa.org.za/Vicennalia.pdf

Website: https://dmarrmea3.wixsite.com/website

(CFP closed June 30, 2019)

 

 

CLASSICAL HERITAGE FORUM II: LANGUAGE AND LEARNING

University of Sydney (CCANESA), NSW, Australia: August 22, 2019

Our next Classical Heritage Forum turns to the place of Classics in NSW secondary schools.

This evening forum is for teachers, academics, museum educators and all those interested in the Classics at The University of Sydney. Join educators and scholars as we investigate the way Classical language and learning have influenced education in New South Wales.

We will explore the changing nature of pedagogy in the Classics from the early days of the colony to the present, both within and beyond formal schooling, and examine the shifting history of Classics as the hallmark of a liberal education, as it has changed from a field that was conventionally the preserve of the educated few to one that attracts a culturally and ethnically diverse group of students, with as many young women as men. Against this backdrop, our panellists will discuss the rewards and challenges of an education in the Classics, and their place in the school curriculum of the 21st century.

Program

4pm Arrival and afternoon tea

4:20pm Welcome and introductions: Professor Penny Russell

4:30pm – 5.30pm. Classical Learning: A Shifting Landscape

Speakers: Professor Penny Russell, University of Sydney; Associate Professor Julia Horne, University of Sydney Associate Professor Helen Proctor, University of Sydney; Dr Emily Matters, President, Classical Languages Teachers Association.

5:40pm – 6:50pm Classical Learning Today (Panel Discussion)

Panel chair: Professor Peter Wilson, University of Sydney

Speakers: Helen Pigram, North Sydney Girls High; Michael Salter, Baulkham Hills High; Alison Chau, Sydney Girls High; Nathan Bottomley, Sydney Grammar; Anthony Gibbins, Sydney Grammar.

6:50pm Closing remarks: Professor Penny Russell

6:50pm–7.30pm Drinks and supper

Information: https://fass.e-newsletter.com.au/link/id/zzzz5d083f82ab0fe831Pzzzz5c1334172635a000/page.html

 

 

SAPIENS UBIQUE CIVIS VII - SZEGED 2019

PhD Student and Young Scholar Conference on Classics and the Reception of Antiquity

Szeged, Hungary: August 28–30, 2019

The Department of Classical Philology and Neo-Latin Studies, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Szeged, Hungary is pleased to announce its International Conference Sapiens Ubique Civis VII – Szeged 2019, for PhD Students, Young Scholars, as well as M.A. students aspiring to apply to a PhD program.

The aim of the conference is to bring together an international group of young scholars working in a variety of periods, places, languages, and fields.Papers on a wide range of classical subjects, including but not limited to the literature, history, philology, philosophy, linguistics and archaeology of Greece and Rome, Byzantinology, Neo-Latin studies, and reception of the classics, as well as papers dealing with theatre studies, comparative literature, contemporary literature, and fine arts related to the Antiquity are welcome.

Lectures: The language of the conference is English. Thematic sessions and plenary lectures will be scheduled. The time limit for each lecture is 20 minutes, followed by discussion. It is not possible to present via Skype.

Abstracts: Abstracts of maximum 300 words should be sent by email as a Word attachment to sapiensuc@gmail.com strictly before June 11, 2019. The document should also contain personal information of the author, including name, affiliation and contact email address, and the title of the presentation. Acceptance notification will be sent to you until June 18, 2019.

Registration: The registration fee for the conference is €70, however for those who apply before May 19, 2019, we provide a €20 discount. The participation fee includes conference pack, reception meal, closing event, extra programs, and refreshments during coffee breaks. The participation fee does not include accommodation, but the conference coordinators will assist the conference participants in finding accommodation in the city centre. Those who intend to bring a guest are obligated to pay €20 in addition to the registration fee.

Publication: All papers will be considered for publication in a peer-reviewed international journal on Classics.

Getting here: Szeged, the largest city of Southern Hungary, can be easily reached by rail from Budapest and the Budapest Ferenc Liszt International Airport. Those who prefer travelling by car can choose the European route E75, and then should take the Hungarian M5 motorway, a section of E75, passing by the city.

We look forward to your participation in this conference.

Dr. János Nagyillés PhD - Head of Department, Chairman of the Conference Committee

Members of the Conference Committee: Dr. Endre Ádám Hamvas PhD; Dr. Imre Áron Illés PhD; Dr. habil. Péter Kasza PhD; Dr. Ferenc Krisztián Szabó PhD; Prof. László Szörényi DSc; Dr. habil. Ibolya Tar CSc

Conference coordinators:
Fanni Csapó (fannicsapo@gmail.com)
Attila Hajdú (attila.hajdu85@gmail.com)
Dr. Tamás Jászay PhD (jaszaytamas@gmail.com)
Dr. Gergő Gellérfi PhD (gellerfigergo@gmail.com)

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/scs-news/cfp-sapiens-ubique-civis-vii-szeged-2019

(CFP closed June 11, 2019)

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September 2019

[SESSION] ROMAN ARCHAEOLOGY IN THE 21st CENTURY

25th Annual Meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists

Bern, Switzerland: September 4-7, 2019

Two decades into the 21st century, the political and social framework of Europe is facing multiple challenges with issues such as migration, growing political and social instabilities, and economic uncertainties on the table. Against the backdrop of these current transformations, Roman Archaeology could (rightly?) be considered an exclusive and elitist pastime by detached academics. Our session thus aims at discussing two major topics:

(1) Who cares about the Roman past anyway?
In the light of demographic changes in Europe, we must consider to which parts of society and to which audience Roman Archaeology is catering. Is the Roman past an identity marker only for a white, indigenous, European, Western civilization? What role can Roman Archaeology play in a society in quantitative and structural demographic transition? What strategies might Roman Archaeology develop to include all strata of the population?

(2) What is the take on Roman Archaeology at grassroot level?
Certain methodological, theoretical and intellectual issues of current international scholarship, such as the fragmentation of Archaeology into subdisciplines, growing language barriers, or questions on the costly application of natural sciences and new technologies are often only related to the realm of well-funded, higher-education research institutions. What are the key issues that fall under the remit of local museums, archaeological parks, heritage agencies and the large number of non-academics engaging in Roman Archaeology?

Interested non-academics from the re-enactment scene, field archaeologists and find officers of regional heritage agencies, museum curators and managers, university faculty, and political stakeholders are invited to share their perspectives about the current state, potentials and limits of Roman Archaeology in the 21st century. The session aims at exploring Roman Archaeology’s relevance today by giving a voice to all those involved in the discipline and by gathering professionals from all backgrounds contributing to the study of the Roman World.

Important Information: Deadline for paper proposals February 14th. Submissions and registration at https://www.e-a-a.org/EAA2019

Organizers: Lawrence, Andrew (Switzerland/the Netherlands) – University of Berne, Institute for Archaeological Sciences, Department Archaeology of the Roman Provinces/Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, CLUE+; Murer, Cristina (Switzerland) – University of Berne, Historical Institute, Department of Ancient History and Reception of History; Krmnicek, Stefan (Germany) – University of Tübingen, Institute of Classical Archaeology.

Contact: andrew.lawrence@iaw.unibe.ch; cristina.murer@hist.unibe.ch; stefan.krmnicek@uni-tuebingen.de

Call: https://www.e-a-a.org/EAA2019/Programme.aspx?Program=3#Program (Session #212)

(CFP closed February 14, 2019)

 

 

CONSTRUCTING THE ‘PUBLIC INTELLECTUAL’ IN THE PREMODERN WORLD

University of Manchester, UK: September 5-6, 2019

A two-day conference co-hosted by the Genealogies of Knowledge project, the Division of Classics, Ancient History and Archaeology, and the Centre for Translation and Intercultural Studies, University of Manchester, UK

A notable feature of intellectual history has been the role of translation in the evolution and contestation of key cultural concepts, including those involved in the negotiation of power: we may think here of the extent to which modern terms such as ‘politics’ and ‘democracy’ derive ultimately from classical Greek, often mediated through different languages. Translation and other forms of mediation are similarly implicated in renegotiating the concept of the public intellectual in different historical and cultural locations.

The role and future of the public intellectual in the contemporary world continues to inspire academic and non-academic debate. In his 1993 Reith lectures, Edward Said gives voice to what might be called a ‘common-sense’ vision of the public intellectual. At first glance, Said’s description of the fiercely independent, incorruptible intellectual whose writing and thought serve as a lifelong calling to relentlessly and selflessly oppose injustice has a timeless quality. Closer examination reveals, however, that Said’s vision is very much a product of his time and personal circumstances. Several assumptions underlie Said’s vision. For example, Said insists on a strict division between the public and the private sphere. He declares that the public intellectual’s main task is making enlightened representations in language that assess actual states-of-affairs against the prescriptions of universal moral precepts. For Said, the public intellectual must be secular, being staunchly opposed to religion spilling outside ‘private life’. Finally, Said holds that the norms that serve as the public intellectual’s moral compass are the principles of liberal democracy. These ostensibly universal elements of Said’s portrait – the division between public and private realms, the view of democratic liberalism as a universally valid moral system, and a robust secularism that staunchly opposes religion spilling outside ‘private life’ – are all in reality the product of the particular historical experiences of Western Europe.

Research undertaken by the Genealogies of Knowledge team serves as a challenge to such contemporary constructions of the public intellectual as a timeless and culturally ubiquitous figure in human societies, and demonstrates that the figure of the public intellectual has also been inscribed into historical representations of premodern society and politics. In the premodern world, perhaps more than today, the status of ‘public intellectual’ derived from access to cultural capital associated with particular bodies of knowledge – often but not necessarily religious as well as secular – and in particular from the construction of intellectual authority via expertise in a privileged learned language (Greek, Latin, classical Arabic, Sanskrit).

‘Constructing the public intellectual in the premodern world’ is based on the premise that the term ‘public intellectual’ can meaningfully be used either of individuals or of groups in the premodern world. It has two aims. The first is to examine the specific historical conditions, including both the continuities but also the changes in conceptual and cultural categories, which served to construct this figure in the premodern world. The second is to understand how modern representations of the premodern ‘public intellectual’ have been used to inspire and shape modern ideas about the role and remit of public intellectuals in the contemporary world.

The conference welcomes proposals for individual papers or panels (ideally of three papers) that grapple with how the ‘public intellectual’ was constructed in premodern societies, and how their legacy influences how we understand the public intellectual today. The conference invites scholars to present research on, but not limited to, the following broad themes:

Constructing categories. Focusing on the historically and culturally specific categories from which representations of the public intellectual are constructed. Topics include: the premodern ‘public’, premodern textual and visual political representation, premodern ‘intellect’ and ‘intellectuals’, premodern sites of representation, power and representation in the premodern world, the self in premodern politics, political life in the premodern world.

Constructing authority with language and translation. Focusing on privileged languages of learning as a mode of access to political privilege. Topics include: politics of translation, constructing scientific lexicons, language and power in the premodern world, premodern lingua francas, politics and vernacular languages.

Constructing authority with knowledge. Focusing on the historical changes and cultural differences in the specialised forms of knowledge that give its possessor the power to govern the lives of others. Topics include: political knowledge; specialisation and professionalism in the premodern world; the relationship between specific learned languages and particular areas of expertise such as religious learning, legal learning and medical learning; political authority and privileged languages of learning; premodern education and political power; patronage and patrons; centre and periphery in premodern intellectual geography; public intellectuals on the move.

Utilising the premodern public intellectual. Focusing on how portraits of premodern ‘public intellectuals’ influence our ideas about what the public intellectual should be today. Topics include: using ancient models for making the modern public intellectuals, contemporary legacies of ancient philosophers, ‘practical philosophy’ in the modern world.

Submissions are welcome from diverse fields, including but not limited to: history, linguistics, translation studies, anthropology, sociology, philosophy, political science, religious studies, development and regional studies, and classics.

Individual abstracts and panel proposals should be sent to Kamran Karimullah (karimullah.kamran@manchester.ac.uk) by 1st March 2019.

Speakers and the titles of their papers are listed below: fuller details including abstracts are available at the conference website.

Keynote speakers:

Khaled Fahmy (University of Cambridge), “To Whom Does the Body Belong: Modern Medicine and Medical Professionals in Times of Upheaval”
Chris Stray (Swansea University) “The Politics of the Classical: Language and authority in the 19th century”

Other confirmed speakers:

Nilza Angmo (Ambedkar University, Delhi), “The Reciter and the Translator: Transmission of religious texts in Tibetan Buddhism”
Radha Chakravarty (Ambedkar University, Delhi), “The River of Knowledge: Rabindranath Tagore and Premodern Thinkers”
Tim Cornell (University of Manchester), “Ancient and modern ideas of History and Historical Writing”
Eduardo Crisafulli (Independent researcher), “The construction of Dante as a modern intellectual ahead of his time”
Maribel Fierro (ILC-CSIC, Madrid), “Ibn Tumart and Ibn Rushd (Averroes): exploring the ‘public intellectual’ from the Medieval Maghreb”
Chiara Fontana (Sapienza University of Rome/Italian Institute of Oriental Studies), “A Farewell to the Beauty: Political, Aesthetical and Social Aspects of Ibn al-Muʽtazz’s (861 – 908) Legacy as a Pre-modern Public Intellectual. An In-Depth Inquiry in His Neglected Work Fuṣūl at-Tamāthīl fī Tabāshīr as-Surūr (Examples and Similes on the Pleasure of Sharing Joy)”
Matthias Haake (University of Münster), “All over the Ancient Mediterranean world? The social figure of the intellectual in the Greek and Roman worlds from the Archaic period to Late Antiquity – a comparative approach”
Joanna Komorowska (Cardinal Stefan Wyszyński University, Warsaw), “Knowing the Future: the Public Face of an Astrologer”
Taro Mimura (Hiroshima University, Japan), “Arabic Translation Contests in the Abbasid Courts – The Process of Publicizing Greek Scientific Knowledge in the Abbasid Period”
Seán Morris (University of Exeter), “In Latin and French: a Bilingual Mathematician writing for two Audiences”
Zrinko Novosel (University of Zagreb/Croatian Institute of History), “Writing on the Topic of Law in the Periphery. The Case of Imbrih Domin and Konstantin Farkaš”
Hammood Obaid (University of Manchester), “Ǧābir Bin Ḥayyān and The Earl of Northumberland: Elizabethan conceptions of science, magic and their role in society”
Matthew Payne (Leiden University), “Cicero and Aulus Gellius: the public intellectual as translator and mediator in the Roman world”
Dino Piovan (University of Verona), “Reading Thucydides in Early 20th-Century Italy”
Koen Scholten (Utrecht University), “Scholarly Identity in Early Modern Europe: A Quantitative Approach to Early Modern Collective Vitae of Learned Men and Women”
Emily Selove (University of Exeter), “The Sorcerer Scholar: al-Sakkākī (d. 1229) as grammarian and court magician”
Youcef Soufi (University of British Columbia), “Some Precursors of the Modern Public Intellectual; Disputation and Critique Among Islamic Jurists in the 10th-13th Century”
John Taylor (University of Manchester), “English historians of ancient Greece from Mitford to Grote”
Rogier van der Wal (Leiden University/University Campus Fryslân, Leeuwarden), “Another kind of public intellectual: Oscar Wilde and Harry Mulisch”
Laura Viidebaum (New York University), “Past Perfect: Isocrates and the Emergence of Public Intellectuals”
Hans Wietzke (Carleton College, Minnesota), “Wit to Power: Rethinking the Royal Addressee in Archimedes’ Sand-Reckoner”

Website: http://genealogiesofknowledge.net/events/public-intellectual/

(CFP closed March 1, 2019)

 

 

THE LITERARY IMAGE AND THE SCREEN

Department of Modern Languages and Cultures, University of Genoa, Italy: September 5-6, 2019

The conference is co-organised by the University of Genoa and the University of Oxford.

Our conference aims to explore the connections and relationships between literature and the screen, from the pre-cinematic age to the era of new digital technologies. A cross-media approach, aimed at understanding the reciprocal influences between these various artistic forms, as seen from the point of view of techniques of representation, theoretical exchanges and the circulation of works, will shed new light on ideas in, and theories of, both literature and the cinema.

The dialogue between different genres of literature and film has been crucial in their respective developments from the birth of cinema to the present day. Moreover, various texts and authors in the literature of the pre-cinematic era can be analysed through film techniques and be regarded as, in some ways, anticipating them.

Our keynote speakers are Nikolaj Lübecker and Laura Marcus (University of Oxford).

Please send your abstracts (max. 250 words) and short bios (max. 50 words) in PDF to: oxford.genoa.conference.2019@gmail.com

The deadline for submissions is 30 June.

Below are the links to the full version of our CFP as well as to our Facebook event.

Call: https://www.academia.edu/39368828/Call_for_Papers_The_Literary_Image_and_The_Screen

Info: https://www.facebook.com/events/2238637746401362/

(CFP closed June 30, 2019)

 

 

LIFE AND MIND. ARISTOTELIAN THEMES IN CONTEMPORARY PHILOSOPHY

Institut d’Études Avancées de Paris, France: September 5-6, 2019

Aristotle’s views on the nature of life and mind, and the relation between them, are taking on a renewed significance in contemporary philosophy. Increasingly, Aristotelian themes arise in a number of different fields, such as philosophy of mind and philosophical psychology, metaethics, and philosophy of biology. Central issues include whether Aristotle’s conception of human nature can usefully form the ground of a naturalized ethics, whether current discussions of the continuity between life and mind can benefit from Aristotle’s own version of the continuity thesis, whether evolutionary biology could benefit from a theory of the organism of the sort that Aristotle’s biological works offer.

Despite the interest in exploring Aristotelian themes in contemporary philosophy, there has been no coordinated attempt to survey or integrate the ways in which Aristotle’s approach to understanding life, mind, and the relation between them might inform and enrich our own. The objective of this workshop is to explore the way in which Aristotelian thought can brought to bear on contemporary research on the much-debated issue of the so-called mind-body problem and on its implications for the conceptualization of notions such as those of organism, animal and human perception and action, human moral agency, and the relation between mind and life. Such themes are of crucial importance for philosophical research and beyond.

Scholars working in ancient philosophy are paired with researchers in psychology and/or contemporary philosophy of biology. Each pair will discuss a common theme with a dual focus on the potential of Aristotle’s philosophy to contribute to the contemporary debate, on one side, and on the actual impact of such contributions for contemporary research, on the other. The workshop constitutes an explicit attempt to bridge the gap between classics and contemporary biological and psychological theory and, as such, it features an exploratory research design.

Participants include Christopher Austin (Oxford), Pia Campeggiani (Bologna), Victor Caston (Michigan), Sophia Connell (Birkbeck, London), Klaus Corcilius (Tübingen), Véronique Decaix (Paris 1), James Lennox (Pittsburgh), Anna Marmodoro (Durham), Laura Nuño de la Rosa (Complutense, Madrid), Denis Walsh (Toronto), Michael Wheeler (Stirling).

Registration is free. Full programme and registration information: https://www.paris-iea.fr/en/events/life-and-mind-aristotelian-themes-in-contemporary-philosophy-2

 

 

'BECOMING' AND THE ROMAN WORLD

Department of Classics and Ancient History, Durham University (UK): September 11-12, 2019

We are pleased to announce the call for papers for the following conference, organised by and for postgraduates and ECRs working on the Roman world in its widest sense:

Change and transformation occupied daily life in the Roman world on many different levels, from the repeated adjustment of imperial boundaries and political shifts in government to semantic shifts and changing fashions in dress and hairstyle. Unsurprisingly, then, the concepts of transformation, change, and metamorphosis have found various expressions in Roman culture and literature. Such transformations have been studied extensively through a variety of methodological lenses, such as gender studies, genre studies, and reception studies. Recent interest in the concept of liminality provides a means for focusing on the process of transformation itself.

This conference will explore the transitional phase(s) of transformation, or, in other words: processes of ‘becoming’. It aims to discuss how different kinds of change were experienced, conceived of, and explored in the Roman world, and how modern perceptions and engagement with the Roman world have changed.

We aspire to bring together an interdisciplinary community of scholars, in order to make progress towards a fuller understanding of change and metamorphosis in the Roman world. We invite proposals from subjects including - but not limited to – history, art and archaeology, literature, architecture, reception studies and philosophy; and we are especially keen to welcome doctoral students and ECRs.

We welcome proposals for 20 minute papers. Some suggested interpretations include:

* ‘Becoming’ and the navigation and performance of gender and adulthood, e.g. rites of passage and the transformation from child to adult;
* ‘Becoming’ and identities in the Roman world, e.g. the development and transformation of identities throughout time, changing conceptions of “the other”, or philosophical approaches to identity and selfhood;
* ‘Becoming’ in urban spaces and ‘becoming’ in and of landscapes more broadly, e.g. transformations of the cityscape, construction work and its effects on urban life and environment;
* ‘Becoming’ a text, story or topos across literature and material culture, e.g. the development and/or reception of written texts, genres, stories, or characters throughout time;
* ‘Becoming’ Classics and ‘becoming’ evidence, e.g. changes in methodology, the physical changes undergone by evidence, and changing relationships with and reception of evidence.

Confirmed keynote speaker: Dr Alexander Kirichenko (Humboldt Universität, Berlin)

If you would like to present a paper at this conference, please send an abstract of up to 300 words to becominginrome2019@gmail.com before 5pm (GMT+1) on Friday 28 June. Thanks to generous contributions from our sponsors, the Northern Bridge Consortium and the Department of Classics and Ancient History (Durham University), there will be no conference fee. Lunch, coffee breaks, and a conference dinner will be provided. Additionally, there is a limited number of travel bursaries available: please indicate in your submission whether you would like to apply for a travel bursary. Applicants will be selected and notified in early July.

NB. We are committed to making the event as inclusive as possible, so please do get in touch directly with the organisers via becominginrome2019@gmail.com if you have any enquiries regarding access, and for any further information.

The organisation team: Peter Donnelly; Simona Martorana; Esther Meijer; Sophie Ngan (Durham University); Sara Borello (Newcastle University).

More information: Please feel welcome to follow our conference via @becominginrome and https://becominginrome.wordpress.com

(CFP closed June 28, 2019)

 

 

TIME, TENSE AND GENRE IN ANCIENT GREEK LITERATURE

King’s College London: 12-13 September, 2019.

Offers of papers are invited for a conference in the Classics Department at King’s College London on 12th and 13th September 2019. It will be convened by Edith Hall and Connie Bloomfield in the college’s Anatomy Museum. The title is Time, Tense and Genre in Ancient Greek Literature. The intention is to deepen our understanding of the distinctive temporal dimensions of written documents in ancient Greek, of whatever genre, provenance, authorship and date.

Confirmed keynote lectures will be delivered by Dr Katherine Harloe and Professor Felix Budelmann.

The conference is a response to increasing interest in the evocation of time in classical literature under the influence of Aristotle’s discussion of the temporal modes in which different varieties of speech operate in the Rhetoric, Suzanne Langer’s Feeling and Form: a Theory of Art (1953) and especially Mikhail Bakhtin’s argument that genres are ways of being in time.

Questions that might be addressed are these:
* Can we helpfully think of ancient genres as operating within certain tenses?
* What kind of ‘presents’ are/are not used and shared by lyric and comedy, encomium and epistle?
* How do authors periodise mythical time, for example the tendency of satyr play to reach back beyond the myths of Troy, Argos and Thebes to the world of Hesiod and the Homeric Hymns, the birth of gods and the creation of civilization?
* What techniques and effects are created by the inclusion of prophetic and oracular voices and perspectives in envisioning the future, or ghosts to articulate voices from the past?
* How do discrete genres address the future and use future tenses, performatively, deliberatively or potentially?
* What is the effect of present-tense narrative and dialogue in texts ostensibly set in the past?
* How has our understanding of the Greek aorist and perfect tenses been affected by advances in literary theory such as narratology?
* How did the Greeks think about the different relation to time inherent in visual and textual media?
* How have the sophistication of Greek thinking about time, and availability of complex tense modes contributed to the creation and projection of a ‘classical tradition’?

Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be submitted to connie.bloomfield@kcl.ac.uk by May 1st 2019.

Edited 27/7/2019. Provisional Program:

Thursday 12th September 2019
0945 Registration and Coffee
1020 Welcome (Connie Bloomfield and Edith Hall)
Session 1: Archaic Time
1030 Tobias Myers Imperfective Moments: The Celestial Perspective in Iliadic Battle Narratives
1100 Rioghnach Sachs Homoeroticism, Time and the Determination of Genre in Sappho's Fragments
1130 Alex Purves Alcman, Sappho, and the ‘Lyric Present'
1200 Break
1230 Peter Moench Bending Time: Cosmic History and Human Temporality in Pindar's Nemean 6
1300 Ditmar Dragnev Aesop and the Future
1330 Lunch
Session 2: Ethnographic and Historiographic Time
1430 Tobias Joho Tense Usage, Dialogue Form and Characterization in Herodotus
1500 Keating McKeon Perseid Wars and Notional Nostos in Herodotus' Histories
1530 Kenneth Yu Aetiology and Temporality in Greek Ethnographic Literature
1600 Brian McPhee Ethnography in the Past Tense: The Amazons in Apollonius' Argonautica
1630 Tea
1700 Keynote 1: Felix Budelmann Tense, Aspect and Temporality in the Greek Lyric Present
1800 Drinks and Speakers' Dinner

Friday 13th September 2019
Session 3: Time, Knowledge and Narrative
0900 Carol Atack Temporalities of Knowledge in Plato's Protagoras
0930 Isobel Higgins Conceptualising the Future in Lycophron's Alexandra
1000 Alessandro Vatri The Living Past: Tense and Genre in the Critical Essays of Dionysius of Halicarnassus
1030 Coffee
1100 Robert Rohland The time of Dining and the Time of Death: Sardanapallus, Epitaphs and Performance
1130 Carlo Delle Donne Tenses in the Genre of Greek Cosmology: the Case of Plutarch
1200 Jody Cundy Turning Hierophany into Text: Pausanias on Lebadeia and the Oracle of Trophonius
1230 Lunch
Session 4: Dramatic and Theatrical Time
1330 Keynote 2: Sheila Murnaghan The Singularity of the Tragic Day
1430 Marcus Bell Mis-step in Time—Dancing Elsewhen through Euripides' Bakkhai
1500 Efstathia Athanasopoulou Entangled in Time: Satyr Drama in Present Tense
1530 Tea
1600 Devan Turner Silenus and the Chorus of Satyr Drama as Time Travellers
1630 Peter Swallow Time in Old Comedy
1700 Roundtable Discussion over Wine
1800 Depart

Call: https://www.facebook.com/expressum/posts/1148183248695585

(CFP closed May 1, 2019)

 

 

TEMPORALITIES, IDEOLOGIES, POETICS: ANCIENT AND EARLY MODERN PERSPECTIVES

Venice, Italy (Palazzo Pesaro Papafava): September 12-13, 2019

This conference explores Classical and Early Modern literary forms that draw connections between, and are concerned with the dynamics of, time and power. It constitutes part of a larger research project exploring the politics and aesthetics of time in ancient and early modern writing. The conference will focus mainly on Latin and Early Modern Latin texts; however, we welcome presentations on any of the topics suggested below:

* aspects of time in didactic, antiquarian, epistemological and scientific literatures, and the ways in which these texts interact with power discourse;

* changes in the reckoning, recording, organising, or understanding of time, and their embodiment in literary and/or other representational forms;

* grand narratives of time and their ideological uses (e.g. the Golden Age, apocalypse, ‘progress’, decline, etc.);

* the ‘tense’ of certain classical literary genres (e.g. the lyric present; the general impulse towards the past in pastoral poetry; etc.) and their early modern reception;

* literary forms that explore how individual/collective experiences of time are mediated by class, race, and gender;

* literary forms that encode, or proleptically address, modern understandings of the modes of time, the consciousness of time, the unreality of time, etc.

Format: Each speaker will be allocated 30 minutes for their presentation, followed by 15 minutes of discussion.

Confirmed speakers include: Helen Dixon (University College Dublin), Philip Hardie (University of Cambridge), Duncan Kennedy (University of Bristol), and Caroline Stark (Howard University, US).

Funding: This conference has the financial support of the British Academy and the Warwick in Venice Programme. Further sources of funding are being sought. Depending on the outcome of our funding applications, we may be able to offer (whole or part) financial support towards the cost of travel for graduate students.

Submission of abstract: Please send an abstract of no more than 500 words of your proposed paper by email to Bobby Xinyue (b.xinyue@warwick.ac.uk). The abstract should omit any reference identifying the author to ensure anonymity in the review process. Deadline for submission of abstracts is 5pm, 8th March 2019.

Edited 21/06/2019:

Program: https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/ren/news_and_events/conferences/redesigningtime

Day 1, Thursday 12 September 2019
Welcome and Opening Remarks
8.50-9:00 Prof. Ingrid De Smet and Bobby Xinyue (University of Warwick, UK)

Panel 1: History of Time
9:00-9:40 Ahuvia Khane (Royal Holloway, University of London, UK)
Ancient Narrative Time: Homer, Literary History, and Temporality
9:40-10:20 Duncan Kennedy (University of Bristol, UK)
Time, Historical Ontology, and Interpretation: the Case of Lucretius
10:20-11:00 Andrew Laird (Brown University, US)
Angelo Poliziano’s Brief History of Time

Panel 2: Temporalities in Roman Epic
11:30-12:10 Anke Walter (University of Newcastle, UK)
The ‘Grand Narrative’ of Time and Fate in Vergil’s Aeneid
12:10-12:50 Siobhan Chomse (Royal Holloway, University of London, UK)
History in Ruins: Temporality, Irony and the Sublime in Lucan’s Bellum Civile

Panel 3: Epistolary Time
14:40-15:20 Stephen Harrison (University of Oxford, UK)
Time to Come: Horace’s Epistolary Futures
15:20-16:00 Catharine Edwards (Birkbeck, University of London, UK)
The Day of Reckoning: Seneca’s Epistolary Time

Panel 4: The Representation of Time and the Writing of History
16:30-17:10 Martin Stöckinger (University of Cologne, Germany)
Historiography and Chronography in Rome
17:10-17:50 Marco Sgarbi (Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, Italy)
Francesco Robortello on History

Day 2, Friday 13 September 2019

Panel 5: Personification and Embodiment of Time
9:00-9:40 Susannah Ashton (Trinity College Dublin, Republic of Ireland)
The Apotheosis of Time: Chronos and Cosmos in Pherecydes’ Heptamychos
9:40-10:20 Rebecca Batty (University of Nottingham, UK)
Rivers as the Embodiment of Disrupted Time: the Metamorphoses’ Apocalyptic Episodes
10:20-11:00 Tom Geue (University of St Andrews, UK)
Slaving Time: brevitas from the Bottom Up

Panel 6: Time and Politics in Early Modern Latin Poetry
11:30-12:10 Bobby Xinyue (University of Warwick, UK)
Extension and Closure in Renaissance Poetic Calendars
12:10-12:50 Elena Dahlberg (Uppsala University, Sweden)
Time as a Political Tool in Neo-Latin Poetry from the Swedish Empire

Panel 7: Humanist Refoundations of Early Rome
14:40-15:20 Helen Dixon (University College Dublin, Republic of Ireland)
Ancient Chronology and the Origins of Rome in the Renaissance
15:20-16:00 Caroline Stark (Howard University, US)
Shaping Realities: Refounders and the Politics of Time in the Renaissance

Panel 8: Prediction and Finality
16:30-17:10 Ovanes Akopyan (University of Innsbruck, Austria)
Power, Fortune and scientia naturalis: Predicting Disasters in the Italian Renaissance
17:10-17:50 Philip Hardie (University of Cambridge, UK)
The End of Time: Early Modern Poems on the Last Judgement

Response and Conclusion: 18:00-18:20 Prof. Tiziana Lippiello (Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, Italy)

Call: https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/ren/about_us/centrestaff/xinyueb/redesigningtime

(CFP closed March 8, 2019)

 

 

SICUT COMMENTATORES LOQUUNTUR - AUTHORSHIP AND COMMENTARIES ON POETRY

Leipzig University, Germany: September 26–28, 2019

Organisers: Ute Tischer (Leipzig), Thomas Kuhn-Treichel (Heidelberg), Stefano Poletti (Pisa)

Confirmed speakers: Maria Luisa Delvigo (Udine), Massimo Gioseffi (Milan), Fabio Stok (Rome), Daniel Vallat (Lyon)

We are pleased to invite proposals for an upcoming conference dealing with authorial concepts and authorial figures in ancient commentaries on poetry, with a focus on Virgilian exegesis.

From a hermeneutical point of view, referring to the author of a text is useful in many respects. Knowledge about the author helps to situate a work in time and space and to identify contexts; defining a work as the product of a (single) author can explain its coherence in respect of topic and style. The ‘speaking I’ becomes the target of the reader’s attribution of intentions and authority, especially when the rhetorical design of a text creates authorial figures or voices.

In recent years, studies in classical literature have focused increasingly on author roles, author figures and author voices as part of the rhetorical texture. Technical prose and exegetical literature in particular are attracting attention as discursive areas, where emphasising authorial activities and authorial voices is a rhetorical means to constitute authority. Common to most of the work to date is that scholars usually investigate author roles and authority in texts whose attribution to an empirical author is not questionable.

Our conference by contrast will concentrate on works whose authorial status is in question. The corpus of the extant Virgilian exegesis provides a good example. Apart from commentaries attributed to certain authors (Servius and Tiberius Claudius Donatus), it comprises various authorless, anonymous and pseudepigraphic compilations. The aim of the conference is to shed light on the possible consequences of such doubtful authorial attribution for the reading of these and other collective, authorless texts from an ancient as well as a modern perspective. Taking this as a starting point, we will concentrate on the following topics and possible questions:

1. Problematic authorial status and authority – the example of Virgilian exegesis
* What role do compilers and collectors play as ‘authors’ within Virgilian exegesis?
* Which authorial attributions can be observed on the side of readers (e.g. pseudepigrapha or references to sources)? How can these attributions be explained and what is their effect on the reading and reception of the explanations?
* How do producers and users of compilations deal with alternative or conflicting explanations and with contradicting authorial voices?

2. The “author” as an interpretive tool for exegetical texts
* To what extent can we talk about ‘authorial strategies’ in the process of transmitting and transforming exegetical literature?
* How can authorial roles help us to grasp the stratification behind these texts?
* How do assumed authorial roles or authorial activities (compiler, collector, falsifier, epitomator, glossator etc.) influence our reconstruction of textual genesis, for example, as represented in modern editions?

3. Figured authorial roles in exegetical texts
* Which authorial images, voices and personae can emerge from the specific form and argumentative structure of exegetical texts, and how do the texts differ in these respects?
* What kind of relationship can be seen between the construction of authorial roles in the commentary and in the work commented on?
* How does the construction or evocation of authorship contribute to authorising what is said?

We welcome submissions for talks of about 30 minutes which deal with the above and/or similar questions and topics using the example of Virgilian exegesis or comparing other exegetical corpora on poetry.

We expect to publish selected papers from the conference in an edited volume.

Deadline: Please send abstracts of about 500 words by March 31, 2019 to one of the following addresses:
ute.tischer@uni-leipzig.de
tkuhntr@uni-heidelberg.de
stefano.poletti@sns.it

Call: https://listserv.liv.ac.uk/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind1901&L=CLASSICISTS&P=184489

(CFP closed March 31, 2019)

 

 

HELLENIC POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY AND CONTEMPORARY EUROPE

Herceg Novi (Montenegro): September 29-October 4, 2019

Center for Hellenic Studies, from Podgorica (Montenegro) is happy to announce the international conference on the topic "Hellenic Political Philosophy and Contemporary Europe", to be held in Herceg Novi (Montenegro), from 29 September to 04 October 2019.

The Conference is of an interdisciplinary character, and aims at addressing different social and political issues from perspectives of history, philosophy, economics, theology, history of ideas, anthropology, political theory and other disciplines. Such conception of the scholarly exchange does not fulfill only the purpose of an historical investigation, but will provide a systematic treatment of the topic, thus clarifying existing ideas and advancing new ones. We welcome papers on topics like:

* The concept of the polis in antiquity and modernity
* Freedom and democracy
* Politics and economy
* Democracy, liberalism, totalitarianism
* The philosophy of the polis: Citizen, polis and cultural ideals
* Autonomy and responsibility in politics
* The philosophy of the cosmopolis
* The polis and happiness
* Ethics and politics
* and other relevant themes.

Please see the full call for papers at: http://ichs.me/call-for-papers/

Abstracts of up to 200 words should be submitted by 1 March 2019 EXTENDED DEADLINE MAY 15, 2019, via the registration form, or sent by email to conference@ichs.me

For more information please visit the website: http://ichs.me which will be constantly updated with new information.

Website: http://ichs.me.

(CFP closed March 1, 2019 extended deadline May 15, 2019)

 

 

THE PATRISTIC LEGACY IN EARLY MODERN CULTURE

Trinity College, Cambridge, UK: September 30, 2019

Postgraduate and Early Career Conference, with Keynote Lecture by Professor Karla Pollmann (Bristol)

In recent decades, our understanding of the early modern period has been transformed by close attention to the legacy of the Church Fathers. Under the label ‘Renaissance’, the years c. 1400–1700 were long defined in relation to an apparent renewal of interest in the secular texts of ancient Greece and Rome. Now, however, it is clear that early modern intellectual culture owed at least as great a debt to religious, and in particular patristic, texts.

The transmission of patristic learning was never straightforward; aspects of the Fathers’ works were constantly manipulated, reinterpreted, or ignored. Scholars from diverse disciplinary backgrounds have contributed to the recovery of this complex, multifaceted story. Intellectual historians and theologians have emphasised the ways in which the writings of the Church Fathers served as competing authorities within theological debates, provided tools for research in the developing field of Biblical scholarship, or sources for the knowledge of pagan antiquity. Scholars of classics and political thought have traced the Fathers’ enduring influence as sources of arguments and models of style for written texts and orations. Nor was the reception of the Church Fathers purely of relevance to the elite: as studies of literature, art and cultural history have revealed, patristic writings furnished rich sources to pioneers of the theatre and visual arts, and their wide dissemination influenced the devotional practices of the laity.

Despite these rich and varied developments in the field, the need to bring together insights from separate academic disciplines has only slowly been recognised. Our one-day conference aims to give young scholars an opportunity to bridge the gaps between disciplines. We invite doctoral candidates and early career scholars from the fields of history, divinity, classical studies, literature and art history to present their work to a multidisciplinary audience. Panels will be arranged by theme, to shed light on the diverse ways similar questions have been approached by scholars from different areas.

Professor Karla Pollmann, whose outstanding work in the field has consistently transgressed disciplinary boundaries, will give a keynote lecture, entitled ‘We are what we read or we read what we are? The reception of Augustine of Hippo as a case-study’.

Suggested topics for discussion include (but are not limited to):

* The changing prominence of different fathers in the patristic ‘canon’
* The production of new editions and translations of patristic texts; the importance of Greek, Hebrew and linguistic erudition; ways in which early modern editing choices affect patristic scholarship today
* Ways in which the relationship between the Fathers and pagan antiquity was understood; the importance placed (or not placed) on biographical knowledge of the Fathers
* The role of patristic authority in early modern religious controversies; ways in which contradictions between Fathers were negotiated and exploited; early modern use of Fathers as a normative source for present practice
* How far patristic scholarship was driven by ideals of objectivity or confessional polemic
* The role of Jews and other non-Christians in interpreting the Church Fathers
* The influence of patristic scholarship on early modern beliefs about sacred and secular history
* The patristic legacy beyond the elite; the popular presence of the Fathers; patristic reception amongst women
* Examples of the Fathers being ignored, forgotten or undermined
* Methodological papers exploring fault-lines between disciplines and what patristic scholars can learn from other disciplines; how interdisciplinary cooperation (or lack thereof) affected understandings of the patristic legacy to date

Please send abstracts of no more than 300 words and a CV (max. 1 page) to the convenors, Odile Panetta, Eloise Davies and Thomas Langley, at trl36@cam.ac.uk. The deadline for applications is 1 May. Successful applicants will be notified by 15 May.

We have some funds available to contribute to visiting speakers’ expenses. If you wish to be considered for financial support, please make this clear in your application.

We are grateful to the Cambridge Arts and Humanities Research Council for funding.

Call: https://ptih.wordpress.com/conference-the-patristic-legacy-in-early-modern-culture/

(CFP closed May 1, 2019)

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October 2019

AEMA14: THE FOURTEENTH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE OF THE AUSTRALIAN EARLY MEDIEVAL ASSOCIATION

Theme: Legitimacy - Illegitimacy

Monash University, Clayton, Australia: October 3-5, 2019

This conference invites papers on the broad theme of legitimacy. In a modern world dominated by deeply polemical counter narratives not afraid to adjust facts to claim dominance and, thereby, legitimacy, we look at the ways in which modern forms of the pursuit of legitimacy evolved in the early Middle Ages. Legitimacy can have several meanings, covering aspects of authenticity, legality, validity, and conformity. While it literally refers to something that meets the requirements of the law, this legal aspect is not inherent: something can be legitimate without being legal, or be legal without being legitimate.

In the context of the early medieval period, who legitimated? What was their reasons for doing so? Conversely, what was set aside in the process of illegitimisation? And what do these dominant and counter narratives mean for the presentation of history?

Legitimacy implies dominant views on authority, cultural legitimacy, status, and control of the means to ensure dominance, such as publication. It can create hidden communities and counter-narratives. Even though the early medieval period continues to exist in the popular imagination as backward and insular, in many ways it is a period marked by innovations in both the practice and pursuit of legitimacy, innovations which still resonate to this day. This conference aims to challenge the perception that the modern world is particularly modern in the way it contests legitimacy.

We invite submissions on the following topics:
• Politics and Culture
• Individuals and Institutions
• Law and Justice
• Status and Inheritance
• Authenticity and Fraud
• Orthodoxy and Heresy
• Truth and Propaganda
• Dominant and Counter Narratives
• Objects and Spaces
• Modern (re)interpretations of the Early Medieval

AEMA also welcomes papers concerned with all aspects of the Early Medieval period (c. 400–1150) in all cultural, geographic, religious and linguistic settings, even if they do not strictly adhere to the theme.

We especially encourage submissions from graduate students and early career researchers. Abstracts of 250-300 words for 20-minute papers should be submitted via email to conference@aema.net.au by 5 April 2019 EXTENDED DEADLINE May 20, 2019.

Limited financial assistance is available to AEMA members on acceptance.

Website: http://www.aema.net.au/conference.html

(CFP closed May 20, 2019)

 

 

CICERO IN BASEL. RECEPTION HISTORIES FROM A HUMANIST CITY

Basel, Switzerland: 3–5 October 2019

With the generous support of the foundation Patrum Lumen Sustine (PLuS) the Department of Ancient Civilizations of the University of Basel and the Société Internationale des Amis de Cicéron (SIAC) are jointly organising the international conference "Cicero in Basel. Reception Histories from a Humanist City".

The conference Cicero in Basel aims at charting the presence of the statesman, orator, and philosopher M. Tullius Cicero in the cultural history of Basel, the city located in the border region between Switzer­land, Germany and France. While the study of Classical receptions tends to focus on particular cultural forms and discourses, the scope of the planned conference is programmatically open. Cicero in Basel ex­plores a broad spectrum of engagements with Cicero through the ages: from the manuscript tradition of his works, to Humanist editions and commentaries, up to the political debates and con­tro­versies of today. In this, Cicero in Basel will assess Cicero’s impact on the formation of a specific idea of Humanism in Basel as well as Basel’s role in Cicero’s Nachleben.

The aim of the conference is twofold: It seeks to contribute both to the study of Ciceronian reception and to further our understanding of the history and development of Basel and the regio Basiliensis. Indeed, we expect this critical survey of Ciceronian reception histories from Basel to shed light on the emergence and development of the specific idea of Humanism that to this day plays a fundamental role in the self-image and identity politics of the Humanistenstadt Basel.

The conference will feature contributions that fall under the following general rubrics:

I) Textual history and transmission
II) History of scholarship
III) Politics and society
IV) Literature and visual arts

Confirmed speakers include Alice Borgna, Leonhardt Burckhardt, Giovanni Giorgini, Henriette Harich-Schwarzbauer, Gesine Manuwald, Hans-Peter Marti, Michael D. Reeve, Federica Ros­setti, Benjamin Strau­mann, Petra Schierl, Bram van der Velden, Gregor Vogt-Spira, Ueli Zahnd.

In this Call for Papers we cordially invite early career researchers and PhD students to submit proposals for papers of ca. 25mins; contributions which focus on Ciceronian receptions in literature and the visual arts are particularly welcome. Submissions, including an abstract c. 400 words and a brief CV, should be sent to cicero-latinistik@unibas.ch by 28 April 2019. The selection of contributions will be communicated in the first week of June.

The conference will meet the cost for accommodation and food for all speakers and will be able to con­tribute to their travel ex­penses. Conference languages are German, English, French, and Italian. Selected contributions will be proposed for publication in the series Cicero (Berlin/New York: de Gruyter, with full peer review and open access).

Organisation: Ermanno Malaspina (SIAC) and Cédric Scheidegger Laemmle (Univ. Basel)

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/scs-news/cfp-cicero-basel-reception-histories-humanist-city

(CFP closed April 28, 2019)

 

 

[SEMINAR] THE LANDSCAPE OF ROME'S LITERATURE

Annual Conference of the Association of Literary, Scholars, Critics, and Writers (ALSCW)

The College of the Holy Cross, Worcester, MA, USA: October 3-6, 2019

This CFP is for the seminar "The Landscape of Rome's Literature," one of many seminars that will occur during the ALSCW 2019 annual conference.

Moderator: Aaron Seider, Associate Professor of Classics, The College of the Holy Cross

In the stories of Rome’s beginnings along the Tiber’s bank; of its fields stained by the blood of civil war; and of its battles beyond empire’s edges, Roman authors turned to the landscape to reflect on their society and their writing. What can close readings of Livy’s early Rome, Vergil’s Italian settings, or Tacitus’ British battles, for instance, reveal about the relationship between language and landscape in Roman literature? This seminar offers a forum for exploring a range of questions related to the literary construction of landscapes, with a particular interest in what the Romans’ written landscapes communicate about their identity and their work as authors. We invite papers that address these questions from any perspective, with a range of potential topics including the intersection between landscape and areas such as emotion, memory, genre, time, or aesthetics; the relationship between the natural and built environment; metaphorical uses of the landscape; and literary receptions of the classical landscape.

The seminar will last about two hours and consist of 6-8 participants. Participants exchange drafts of their papers 2-4 weeks before the seminar, and, at the seminar itself, each participant offers a 5-7 minute summary of their paper, and this is followed by 20-30 minutes of discussion.

Anyone who is interested in presenting should submit a proposal of 300 words and a C.V. by email to Lee Oser at leeoser@holycross.edu and Ernest Suarez at Suarez@cua.edu on or before June 1, 2019. While membership in ALSCW is not required to submit a proposal, it is required for participation in the conference. Please feel free to email Aaron Seider aseider@holycross.edu with any questions about the seminar.

Website: http://alscw.org/events/annual-conference/alscw-2019-conference/

Call: https://listserv.liv.ac.uk/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind1905&L=CLASSICISTS&P=4924

(CFP closed June 1, 2019)

 

 

THE 50TH ANNIVERSARY OF FELLINI SATYRICON (1969-2019)

University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia: October 4-6, 2019

Fellini Satyricon (1969), directed by the master Italian director Federico Fellini, was first shown in Rome on 3 September 1969 and released throughout Italy on 18 September 1969. It is among the most famous (and unusual) representations of the Roman world. Originally both admired and attacked, this colloquium aims to mark the film’s 50th anniversary and reconsider its originality and importance.

Programme
- Friday 4 October (evening): a showing of the film (venue and time tba)
- Saturday 5 October: a series of papers, followed by a roundtable discussion (venue and times tba)
- Sunday 6 October: Dr. Anastasia Bakogianni (Massey) – a public lecture to the UQ Friends of Antiquity on cinematic receptions of the classical world (2 p.m., venue tba)

Abstracts
Please send abstracts (200 words) to Tom Stevenson (t.stevenson@uq.edu.au). Abstracts must be received by Friday 19 July 2019.

Conference Fees
- October 4 – the film showing is free
- October 5 – non-members of the UQ Friends of Antiquity will be charged $30 for the day of papers – payable on the day to the Friends
- October 6 – non-members of the UQ Friends of Antiquity will be charged $10 for the public lecture – payable on the day to the Friends

Participants so far
1. Alastair Blanshard (Classics, University of Queensland)
2. Marcus Wilson (Classics, University of Auckland)
3. Bernadette Luciano (European Languages and Literatures [Italian], University of Auckland)
4. Arthur Pomeroy (Classics, Victoria University of Wellington)
5. Tom Stevenson (Classics, University of Queensland)
6. Anastasia Bakogianni (Classical Studies, Massey University)
7. Ika Willis (University of Wollongong)

Organiser
Assoc. Prof. Tom Stevenson
Classics and Ancient History, School of Historical and Philosophical Inquiry
The University of Queensland, Brisbane Qld 4072 Australia
T +61 7 3365 3143 - E t.stevenson@uq.edu.au W uq.edu.au

Call: -

(CFP closed July 19, 2019)

 

 

COMICS UP CLOSE - NEW PERSPECTIVES IN COMIC ART

Lakes International Comic Art Festival, Kendal, Cumbria UK: October 11, 2019

‘Comics Up Close’, the opening event of Lakes International Comic Art Festival 2019, welcomes the submission of abstracts for short papers that explore any aspect of comic art or graphic novels. This is an opportunity to share your current project with other researchers, illustrators, writers and teachers in the field, as well as members of the general public passionate about comics. These papers will be part of sessions inspired by the ‘PechaKucha’ presentation method: participants are asked to speak for 8 minutes with 8 slides.

Areas of interest include but are not restricted to:

- Comic histories
- Comics and the Reinterpretation of Literature
- The politics of comic art
- International comics
- Graphic narratives and memoir
- Comics and horror
- Comics and cinema
- Comics and Science Fiction

Abstracts: please submit a title and an abstract of up to 150 words.

Email address: a.tate@lancaster or n.lackovic@lancaster.ac.uk

Deadline for submission of extracts: 5pm, Friday 16 August

More widely the programme for Comics Up Close is coming together with keynote presentations from Dr Simon Grennan, Leading Research Fellow in the Faculty of Arts and Humanities at the University of Chester and Hannah Berry, Comic Artist and Comics Laureate, plus papers by Professor Kiko Saez de Adana at the University of Alcalá (Spain) and Prof Ana Merino (Wikipedia page here), Professor of Hispanic Studies at the University of Iowa, amongst many others. More information is now available via the LICAF website at https://www.comicartfestival.com/.

Information: https://www.comicartfestival.com/comics-close-new-perspectives-comic-art

Call: https://listserv.liv.ac.uk/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind1907&L=CLASSICISTS&P=96753

(CFP closed August 16, 2019)

 

 

METAMORPHOSIS AND THE ENVIRONMENTAL IMAGINATION, FROM OVID TO SHAKESPEARE

UCLA: October 11-12, 2019

Narratives of metamorphosis, from human into other living forms, have long provided an important site for thinking through the complexities of our relationship with the world around us. From Ovid to David Cronenberg, thinkers and artists have used the trope of physical transformation to figure the ways in which human and non-human agencies have evolved from and adapted to one another in a relationship characterised by fluctuating perceptions of friction and symbiosis, distance and proximity. This conference seeks to locate the theme of metamorphosis in the early history of the western environmental imagination, from Classical antiquity to the Early Modern period; and to explore the ways in which the various cultural and historical manifestations of metamorphosis from this earlier period resonate with the environmental approaches and concerns of our present day.

Metamorphosis may be an idea with a long history, yet it continues to answer to the eco-critical imperatives of our own era. Its exposure of the porousness of human and non-human categories calls into question many other dualisms that current environmental discourses seek to deconstruct: between mind and matter, self and other, subject and object, culture and nature, all these the legacy of an epistemic shift introduced in the Early Modern period that laid the groundwork for the widely prevailing view of human exceptionalism that subsequently took hold. Eco-criticism has, since the nineteenth century, sought to reposition man as the object of environmental factors and forces, and to invest the non-human world with an agency and dynamism that was hitherto held to be the exclusive domain of humankind, even as, more recently, ideas of the Anthropocene have brought this process of redistribution full circle. Nowadays, we are invited to think more of an entangled mesh of human and non-human forces, a hybridizing compound of natureculture, and a fusion of material and discursive practices as biosemiotics and related ideas concerning the creative biosphere transform the world's contents into so much storied matter. Increasingly, eco-critics have turned back to the pre-modern era to search for intellectual analogues for the kinds of ontological continuum and/or hybridization between human and non-human that we are currently seeking the conceptual terminology to describe. Narratives of metamorphosis, a popular theme in Classical, Medieval and Renaissance storyworlds, provide a ready resource for this quest: on the one hand, the transformation of human into non-human bodies stages metamorphosis as a subordination to 'lower' forms of life. At the same time, it also offers a parable (admittedly, a highly anthropocentric one) for explaining the kinds of mind and agency that we now find attributed to non-human matter. Indeed, the emphasis that accounts of metamorphosis characteristically place on the physical aspects of transformation displaces the hegemony of the cognitive faculties as any kind of privileged index of human identity, and speaks rather to a mode of trans-corporeality that sees the human as just one bodily interface among many others.

While Ovid is by no means the first author in the western canon to draw on the theme of metamorphosis in order to reflect on man's relationship with the environment, his epic poem is a cultural landmark that enshrines this theme as a crux for later environmental discourse. Yet its significance as such has garnered more attention from cultural receptions of the poem, above all in the English Renaissance, than from modern scholarship on it (an imbalance that might in turn be attributed to the relative explosion of eco-critical studies of Renaissance culture since the 1990s as compared to a more incipient trend in Classical scholarship). Authors from Chaucer to Shakespeare, whose connection with antiquity is often owed overwhelmingly to a familiarity with Ovid's texts, frequently draw on images of metamorphosis to figure their own environmental questions and concerns, and have attracted a range of modern eco-critical approaches in recent times: from eco-feminist readings of Chaucer's bird narratives to the panoply of environmental concerns located in Shakespeare's probing of the limits of the human.Drawing inspiration from the poem's reception history, the organizers of this conference seek to reposition the Metamorphosesas a foundational text for the history of environmental thought, by investigating how its central theme of metamorphosis resonates with the environmental questions and discourses of the pre-modern era, and by considering how these echo and/or diffract our own. Using Ovid and Shakespeare as bookends for this important chapter in the history of environmental thought, we will invite scholars of Classical, Medieval and Renaissance culture to approach metamorphosis as a prism through which to explore both the continuities and the breaks in a tradition of environmental thinking that connects us, however discontinuously, with the distant past.

Please send a proposal of approximately 500 words to fmartelli@humnet.ucla.edu

DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACTS: October 15, 2018

Confirmed Participants
Jonathan Bate, Professor of English, University of Oxford
Lara Bovilsky, Associate Professor of English, University of Oregon
Emily Gowers, Professor of Classics, University of Cambridge
Lesley Kordecki, Professor of English, DePaul University
Mark Payne, Professor of Classics, University of Chicago
Alex Purves, Professor of Classics, UCLA
Robert Watson, Distinguished Professor of Humanities, UCLA
Bronwen Wilson, Professor of Art History, UCLA

Organizers:
Francesca Martelli, Assistant Professor of Classics, UCLA
Giulia Sissa, Professor of Classics and Political Science, UCLA

Call: https://www.facebook.com/expressum/posts/931031740410738

(CFP closed October 15, 2018)

 

 

HUMANITIES IN THE THIRD MILLENIUM: APPROACHES, CONTAMINATIONS, AND PERSPECTIVES

University of Verona, Italy: October 17-18, 2019

PhD School of Arts and Humanities of the University of Verona is organizing an interdisciplinary PhD Conference to be held in Verona on October 17th-18th 2019.

The Doctoral School in Arts and Humanities of Verona University organizes a multidisciplinary workshop directed to PhD Students and PhD Doctors (maximum two years within dissertation). This meeting will constitute a suitable occasion for meeting and interacting with students and researchers engaged in the Humanities Studies in the multidisciplinary perspective which characterizes our Doctoral School.

The committee will evaluate abstracts for oral presentations regarding the following areas:

Area 1: Theoretical Framework and Methodology in Human Science

Possessing a methodological system apt for the record of human evidence is fundamental for every researcher in Humanities. The methodological apparatus guides the scholar by means of definitions and proceeds following the different questions about theoretical and systemic perspectives - although they can be sometimes controversial - in which we can found the object of our investigation. What are the criteria that guides the processes of interpretation, classification, inference and production of the knowledge and of the discovery?
Keywords: Methods and Theory of Humanities, New Perspectives and Approaches, History of Science

Area 2: Fragments and layers

Research in Humanities often starts from fragments: they can be represented as either single phenomenon or in connection (as layers, structures, landscapes, texts). In a synchronic as well as in a diachronic perspective, the comprehension of the fragment in its context is essential for the study and narration of the human expression.
Keywords: Fragments, Layers, Context, Landscape

Area 3: Hybridization

By means of the social phenomenon described as contact, cultures tend to hybridize and assume new configurations: it is not about abandoning one element for the other, but it is rather a form of coexistence and transformation of the two original elements into a new entity, which will become unique and enriched by this contamination.
Keywords: Hybridization, Contact, Contamination, Evolution

Area 4: Ambivalence

The idea of ambivalence can be found in many branches of cultural studies. It may be found when interpreting the meaning of a word in the field of linguistics, when choosing between textual variants in textual criticism, when deciding which portion of land to excavate in archeological research, when analyzing the “Doppelgänger” topic popping up in fiction, philosophy, iconography and sculpture. The question it is the same: which option is to be chosen, which explanatory strategy is to be favored? Ambivalent are psychological impulses, ethical values and cultural characteristics observed in a society, a folk, a historical period.
Keywords: Ambivalence, Hermeneutics, Textual Variants, Doppelgänger, Cultural Dialogue

The abstracts (word format, max 450 words, in English, French, Spanish, German and Italian) must be sent within 31st May by e-mail to ScienzeUmanistichecon2019@gmail.com

The authors should specify within the e-mail text: 1) Name(s) of the Author(s) and e-mail address; 2) Affiliation(s) (University and Doctoral Course); 3) Title of talk; 4) Selected thematic area; 5) At least three key-words.

For further information please contact ScienzeUmanistichecon2019@gmail.com or see the site https://sites.google.com/view/scienzeumanistiche2019

Coordinating committee: Marta Tagliani, Francesco Tommasi, Elia Marrucci, Vittoria Canciani. Scientific committee: Andrea Rodighiero (Director of the Doctoral School in Arts and Humanities), Stefan Rabanus (Coordinator of the PhD Program in Foreign Literatures, Languages and Linguistics), Manuela Lavelli (Coordinator of the PhD Program in Human Sciences), Paolo Pellegrini (Coordinator of the PhD Program in Philology, Literature and Performance Studies), Attilio Mastrocinque (Coordinator of the International JDP Program in Arts and Archaeology).

Call: https://sites.google.com/view/scienzeumanistiche2019/call-for-papers

(CFP closed May 31, 2019)

 

 

NIHIL OBSTAT: READING AND CIRCULATION OF TEXTS AFTER CENSORSHIP

NYU Global Studies Center, Prague, Czech Republic: October 17-19, 2019

Literary scholars, sociologists, and historians have long explored the processes and ideology of censorship as well as the histories of the censors themselves. Pre-publication censorship practices and the institutions of church and state that foster them have dominated the field of study. Fewer efforts have taken texts after the fact of censorship or have detailed their further intellectual, cultural, and social trajectories. But as Deleuze wrote in Negotiations (1995), "Repressive forces don't stop people expressing themselves, but rather force them to express themselves." While censorship takes various forms, many of them violent, it has tended toward failure, and historically the experience of censorship amongst groups as disparate as 17th century Puritans and 20th century Lithuanian poets is often deeply instructive in the means of subversion, publication, and dissemination. Censorship has informed collecting practices, as with Thomas James, who used the Catholic Index Librorum Prohibitorum to dictate the acquisitions policy of the Bodleian library from the late 16th century onward. Censorship creates new relationships between people and places because it is enforced differently from country to country, even from building to building; for example, in 1984 when the police raided Gay’s the Word bookshop in London to confiscate “obscene” imported books by Oscar Wilde, Tennessee Williams, Kate Millet, and Jean-Paul Sartre, the same titles remained available for loan at Senate House Library a few streets away, and UK publishers continued to publish the same authors unpunished. In the spirit of these examples, this conference seeks to foster an interdisciplinary conversation broaching a larger number of underexplored issues that begin only after the moment of censorship—the excess of argument, collaboration, revision, and in many cases, creative thinking, that are given shape by the experience of suppression.

We are pleased to announce that Hannah Marcus (History of Science, Harvard University) and Gisèle Sapiro (Sociology, Centre national de la recherche scientifique / École des hautes études en sciences sociales) will deliver respective keynote addresses each evening of the conference

This conference aims to be as broad as possible in its geographical, historical, and disciplinary range. The organizers welcome applications from anthropologists, bibliographers, classics scholars, comparative literature scholars, gender studies scholars, historians, philosophers, sociologists, and those within allied fields, including library and information sciences and the publishing industry. The working language of the conference will be English, but participants are naturally encouraged to present research completed in any language(s). The goal of the conference will be to publish the proceedings in a collective volume.

Applications should consist of a title, three-hundred word proposal, and one-page CV, due on May 31, 2019. Accommodations will be available for participants and some funds may be possible for travel assistance within continental Europe.

Possible topics include:

- The reception history of expurgated, bowderlized, and censored texts
- The social history of reading censored and samizdat editions
- The impact of ‘market censorship’ on the rise of small, independent or clandestine publishing establishments.
- Religious communities formed around mutual practices of censorship
- The history of translation vis-à-vis censored texts
- Publishing within colonized spaces
- Canonical texts’ reception vis-à-vis censored editions
- Strategies for circumventing censorship, i.e. scribal publication and xerography
- Scientific and medical pedagogical traditions employing censored texts
- Teaching censored texts: period pedagogy and teaching practices today
- The contingencies of space and geography in censorship practices and the international circulation of censored texts
- ‘Asymmetric’ publication or the coordination of censored and uncensored editions
- The changing status of texts from uncensored to censors, and the inconsistent enforcement of banned items
- Textual histories of self-censored texts and later full republication
- Reversing censorship
- Bibliographical challenges in book description
- Publishing, marketing, and openly advertising censored texts
- Hermeneutic and exegetical concerns facing censored or expurgated texts
- Classical scholarship built upon expurgated texts and embedded polemical citations

In order to apply, please send the materials detailed above to Brooke Palmieri and John Raimo by May 31, 2019: bspalmieri@gmail.com and john.raimo@nyu.edu.

Call: https://networks.h-net.org/node/35008/discussions/3779083/cfp-nihil-obstat-reading-and-circulation-texts-after-censorship

(CFP closed May 31, 2019)

 

 

PRO PUBLICA: A PUBLIC CLASSICS WORKSHOP

Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois, USA: October 18-19, 2019

How can we better speak and write about the ancient Mediterranean for the general public? How can academics engaged in the study of antiquity underscore the relevance of Classics in the present day? The Society for Classical Studies and the Department of Classics at Northwestern University invite applications to participate in the Public Classics Workshop (PCW) scheduled on October 18-19, 2019 on the campus of Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois. The workshop will explore issues surrounding public scholarship rooted in the study of the ancient Mediterranean through a combination of lectures, mentoring, and workshopping a piece of public-facing scholarship. The ultimate goal will be not only to learn, but also to polish a piece of public scholarship that can be pitched for future publication.

Speakers and Mentors:
Sarah E. Bond
Nyasha Junior
Scott Lepisto
Denise McCoskey
Nandini Pandey
Claire Voon
Donna Zuckerberg

Participants will gather on the evening of Friday, October 18th for an opening lecture panel with Sarah Bond and Donna Zuckerberg on Classics in the Public Sphere. Events on Saturday, October 19th will fall into two parts. In the morning, invited speakers will offer a series of short presentations on topics such as finding the right publication, using accessible language, writing about race and gender, podcasting, pitching pieces to editors, and other issues connected to public scholarship. In the afternoon, participants will break into small groups led by a mentor to workshop a pre-circulated public-facing piece of writing (< 3000 words). Attendees are not required to workshop the piece mentioned in the application, but if chosen, they are expected to circulate a piece to the rest of the group by September 15, 2019. Participants are also expected to provide written and oral feedback for fellow public classicists during the workshop.

The Friday evening lecture panel is free and open to the public. Admission to the Saturday workshop is limited to 20 participants, each of whom will be given a stipend of $250 to cover travel expenses. Applicants should apply using this Google Form [https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfphb-2W8ike-SLZipMUQ_83TuoBQq85VqqLEGnXwsbjW9uSQ/closedform] by May 1, 2019. Accepted participants will be notified by June 1, 2019. Advanced graduate students and early career professors are especially encouraged to apply.

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/scs-news/pro-publica-public-classics-workshop

(CFP closed May 1, 2019)

 

 

CIVIL RELIGION FROM ANTIQUITY TO THE ENLIGHTENMENT

Newcastle University, UK: 23-24 October, 2019

Civil religion – the belief that public religion could be subsumed within the administration of the state – has long been recognised by intellectual historians of the early modern period as a feature of republican discourse, most often conceived of as an inheritance from ancient Rome. This recognition, however, has allowed civil religion to remain underexplored as an intellectual tradition on its own terms. A language and concept seeking to reconcile church and state, it draws on numerous traditions, including the legacy of the Reformation and notions of Royal Supremacy, Freethought, Gallicanism, and more. Liberated from the confines of being a subsidiary to republicanism, a rich and complex discourse emerges, through which efforts were made to develop a persuasive vision for a religion conducive to a tolerant and harmonious citizen body. In order to achieve a comprehensive understanding of civil religion and its significance, an open dialogue between religious and intellectual historians is of fundamental importance, a dialogue which has previously been limited by the intense focus of scholars examining civil religion in its political dimension to the exclusion of religion. Moreover, a broad chronological overview of civil religion’s development from Antiquity to Enlightenment is required, beyond its origins in Republican Rome and episodic manifestations in the early modern period, further necessitating the interaction of scholars usually divided by chronological boundaries.

The aim of this conference is to facilitate these urgently needed discussions, bringing together religious and intellectual historians, classicists and early modernists, historians of scholarship and historians of political thought. The resultant rehabilitation of civil religion from its status as a handmaid of republicanism will not only promote methodological innovation through its interdisciplinary emphasis, but will interrogate dominant traditions in these disciplines regarding the relationship between church and state, and that between religion and the Enlightenment.

We are seeking proposals for papers on a range of questions, including, but not limited to:

* Can a clear definition of civil religion be determined? How can a viable framework for its discussion be developed?
* Was the religion of the Roman Republic a civil religion? How was this precedent used by later thinkers? Was it employed beyond the confines of republicanism?
* To what extent were accounts of civil religion influenced by the historical context out of which they emerged?
* How far did the notion of civil religion evolve as a response to the Reformation and its legacy?
* In what ways did civil religion inform Enlightenment thinking?
* Does civil religion need to be situated alongside irreligion, freethought, and priestcraft, or can it also be positioned as a discourse within the church?
* What were the aims of civil religion? Were they simply negative, seeking the limitation of church power, or can they be interpreted as positive, as part of an effort to develop a civil, virtuous society?
* What impact, if any, did civil religion have beyond political and religious discourse? How was it represented in literature, art, biographical writing, and scholarship?

Proposals are invited for papers of twenty minutes, with abstracts of no more than 300 words, to be submitted by Friday 22nd March 2019, to katherine.east@newcastle.ac.uk.

Website: https://newcastlecivilreligion.wordpress.com/

(CFP closed March 22, 2019)

 

 

HIERONYMUS NOSTER: INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON THE 1600TH ANNIVERSARY OF JEROME’S DEATH

Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Ljubljana, Slovenia: October 24-26, 2019

We are delighted to inform you that the International Symposium on the 1600th Anniversary of Jerome’s Death, "Hieronymus noster", will take place in Ljubljana, on October 24th–26th, 2019, at the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts. It is being organised by the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts; the Universities of Ljubljana, Zagreb, Graz, and Warsaw; Central European University (CEU); International Network of Excellence “Europa Renascens”; DANUBIUS Project (Université de Lille); and the Institut des Sources chrétiennes.

Call for Papers:

Hieronyme, veni foras, “Jerome, come out,” Jerome himself wrote in his letter to a friend (Ep. 4), stating a personal desire addressed to God. His own call will provide the starting point of the international scholarly symposium in 2019, commemorating the 1600th anniversary of Jerome’s death. The encounter will highlight recent research trends related to Jerome’s life, to his opus, and to the reception of this ancient ascetic, Biblical scholar, biographer, traveller, epistolographer, theologian, exegete, satirist, and controversialist. The meeting will take place in Ljubljana, Slovenia, among the archaeological sites of Roman Emona from his letters (Ep. 11–12), whose genius loci remains influenced by the proximity of Jerome’s birthplace, Stridon. While the exact whereabouts of Stridon remain unknown, an excursion will be offered by symposium’s organizers in order to discuss some of its potential locations. The conference will be interdisciplinary and will present Jerome in the light of the latest discoveries; its particular focus will be the archaeological finds of Christian Emona from 2018. The papers invited will consider – but will not be limited to – researching Jerome within the framework of historical context, archaeology, biblical exegesis, patristics, classical philology, and theology.

To Offer a Paper:

Please email simpozij.hieronim@teof.uni-lj.si. Provide a title and an abstract in 200 words for a twenty‐minute paper, to be followed by a five‐minute discussion, in English, German, French, or Italian, until March 31st, 2019. Please make sure the title is concise and reflects the contents of the paper. There will be some funds available for food and accommodation. – A separate session will be dedicated to graduate students; their applications are particularly encouraged. – The Committee will reply by April 30th, 2019. Papers will be published in Bogoslovni vestnik: Theological Quarterly – Ephemerides theologicae, and in Keria: Studia Latina et Graeca.

Organizing Committee:
Pablo Argárate, Institute of Ecumenical Theology, Eastern Orthodox Church and Patrology, Faculty of Catholic Theology at the Karl‐Franzens‐University Graz
Ivan Bodrožić, Department of the History of Christian Literature and Christian Teaching, Catholic Faculty of Theology Zagreb
Jan Dominik Bogataj OFM, Patristic Institute Victorinianum, Ljubljana, secretary
Rajko Bratož, Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts
Alenka Cedilnik, History Department, Faculty of Arts, University of Ljubljana
Antonio Dávila Pérez, Department of Classical Philology, University of Cádiz – International Network Europa Renascens
Laurence Mellerin, Institut des Sources chrétiennes (HISOMA‐UMR 5189 research centre)
Dominic Moreau, DANUBIUS Project (Université de Lille/HALMA‐UMR 8164 research centre)
David Movrin, Department of Classical Philology, Faculty of Arts, University of Ljubljana
Elżbieta M. Olechowska, Faculty of Artes Liberales, University of Warsaw
Katalin Szende, Department of Medieval Studies, Central European University, Budapest/Vienna
Miran Špelič OFM, Patristic Institute Victorinianum, Ljubljana
Rafko Valenčič, Faculty of Theology, University of Ljubljana

Website: https://ff.classics.si/2019/01/11/hieronymus-noster/

(CFP closed March 31, 2019)

 

 

REBUILDING / RESTORING ROME. THE RENEWAL OF BUILDINGS AND SPACES AS URBAN POLICY, FROM ANTIQUITY TO THE PRESENT

Rome (École française de Rome, Sapienza Università di Roma): 30-31 October, 2019

Everywhere in Rome, monuments are covered with ancient or modern inscriptions that not only contain the name of the original builder but also commemorate their restoration. Popes from the Quattrocento and Cinquecento who acted as urban planners, such as Sixtus IV, presented themselves as ‘restorers’, even when they were actually modernising the City. This phenomenon is not restricted to the Renaissance period: many Roman emperors already claimed to be rebuilders, such as Augustus who repaired all the damaged temples of Rome according to the Res Gestae, or Septimius Severus who was called Restitutor Vrbis on his coinage. Rome thus seems to be a city that constantly needs to be restored, rebuilt, born again. In the vein of the studies on urban heritage and memory and on cities’ resilience after disasters, more and more historians are interested in the question of restoration. This conference aims to investigate how the notions of restoration and rebuilding were a driving force of Rome’s urban transformation throughout its history, from Antiquity to the 21st century, as well as a political program put forward by the authorities and an ideal more or less shared by the different key actors of the city.

Three aspects of this topic will be discussed. First, the conference will analyse the rebuilding and restoration programs of Rome and its main monuments. We shall consider the scope of these programs, compare the main objectives of the projects and their actual realisation, and examine the concrete aspects of their implementation (funding, construction operations, use and creation of specific tools, etc.) The more paradoxical aspects, such as destroying in order to restore or presenting modernisation as a return to the past, will be welcome. We shall also enquire whether the ideal of renovation was an obstacle to a broad urban restructuration. We invite speakers to look at paradigmatic cases, and to keep a view on the city or district scale rather than narrowly focusing on a single building.

The second aspect concerns the political implications of Rome’s rebuilding. To what extent and in which ways did restoration projects fall within more general political programs, as for example the restoration of the State and its political traditions under the Roman emperors, the reinforcement of papal authority during the medieval and modern periods, or the recreation of classic Rome (republican or imperial) from the ‘French period’ to the fascist regime? What are the connections between the practical and the symbolic dimensions of restoration? Is the purpose always to tend toward the same ideal, to get back to the same period? All these questions are closely related to how the very idea of ‘Rome’ has evolved, from Antiquity to the present. Nevertheless, speakers should avoid a purely metaphorical understanding of the notions of ‘restoration’, ‘rebirth’ and ‘return to the past’: all the papers should connect ideologies and policies with actual interventions or at least projects of material renewal.

Finally, we would like to examine the relationships between rebuilding projects and urban actors (central, municipal or spiritual powers, public experts, inhabitants, etc.) taking into account claims, resistances and conflicts. The wish to return to a previous or idealised form of the city was sometimes a demand expressed by the inhabitants of Rome in response to urban transformations initiated by the popes or the public authorities or caused by economic imperatives. Some humanists, such as Flavio Biondo, even wanted to protect Rome from the ‘violence’ of its own population, and from the popes themselves! At the end of the Middle Ages, the idea that the Romans had been stripped of their own past became a topos. In the second half of the 20th century, associations devoted to heritage preservation like Italia Nostra and intellectuals like Antonio Cederna petitioned for the dismantlement of the fascist urban design of Rome’s area centrale, in order to enhance its historical heritage. More broadly, we shall examine who were the initiators of these restorations, and whom these projects were to benefit.

Speakers are also invited to pay attention to vocabulary and concepts. We will interrogate and historicise the terms of ‘rebuilding’, ‘restoration’, ‘renewal’, ‘restitution’, etc. Are these terms interchangeable or do they have very specific meanings, both in the sources and in the categories used by historians? This conference will provide an opportunity to reflect simultaneously on the production of urban space and on the discourses about the city.

This conference is part of the activities of the LIA Mediterrapolis – Espaces urbains, mobilités, citadinités. Europe méridionale-Méditerranée. XVe-XXIe siècle, and is co-financed by the Centre Roland Mousnier.

The conference will be held at the Ecole française de Rome and Sapienza Università di Roma, on 30-31 October 2019. Papers are accepted in English, French and Italian.

Paper proposals (500 words) should be sent by 1 February 2019, together with a brief bio-bibliography (150-200 words), at the following email address: reconstruire.rome@gmail.com.

The École française de Rome will provide accommodation to the selected speakers and contribute to their travel expenses.

A selection of papers from the conference might be considered for publication in a journal or edited book.

Organizing Committee: Bruno Bonomo (Sapienza Università di Roma), Charles Davoine (École française de Rome), Cécile Troadec (École française de Rome)

Scientific Committee: Martin Baumeister (Deutsches Historisches Institut in Rom), Bruno Bonomo (Sapienza Università di Roma), Sandro Carocci (Università di Roma Tor Vergata), Amanda Claridge (Royal Holloway, University of London), Charles Davoine (École française de Rome), Chiara Lucrezio Monticelli (Università di Roma Tor Vergata), Jean-Claude Maire Vigueur (Università Roma Tre), Cécile Troadec (École française de Rome), Vittorio Vidotto (Sapienza Università di Roma), Maria Antonietta Visceglia (Sapienza Università di Roma)

Call: http://www.efrome.it/en/research/actualite-et-appels/news/ricostruirerestaurare-roma-il-rinnovamento-degli-spazi-pubblici-e-dei-monumenti-come-politica-urba.html

(CFP closed February 1, 2019)

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November 2019

«AERE PERENNIUS»: IL DIALOGO CON L’ANTICO FRA MEDIO EVO E PRIMA MODERNITÀ (‘MORE LASTING THAN BRONZE’. THE DIALOGUE WITH ANTIQUITY BETWEEN THE MIDDLE AGES AND THE EARLY MODERNITY)

Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa, Italy: November 7-8, 2019

PhD course in Literature, Art and History in Medieval and Modern Europe - International Graduate Conference

A group of doctoral students of the first and second year of the PhD course in Literature, Art and History in Medieval and Modern Europe proposes the organisation of the third International Graduate Conference, which is reserved for PhD students and young researchers and will be held at the Scuola Normale Superiore on 7-8 November 2019.

This year, the conference aims to investigate the tradition and recovery of classical and late antique authors in the Middle Ages and early Modernity in their multiple artistic and literary forms (imitatio, reformulation, exegesis, critical reflection on literary genres, etc.). To this end, we welcome proposals for papers relating to the following areas:

1) The classics in Romance philology and literature of the 12th century
1.1) Circulation and transmission of the Latin classics in the Middle Ages.
1.2) The use of the classics in the scholastic education of the first vernacular authors and in the medieval poets of the French area, trait d’union between old and new literary forms.
1.3) Evolution of genres and literary forms from Antiquity to the Middle Ages.
1.4) Critical reflection about Ars poetica.

2) The classical myths between the Middle Ages and the early Renaissance
2.1) Ovid’s images.
2.2) Recovery and reworking of the classics in the late antique and early medieval mythographic production, in particular in Fulgentius’ Mythologiae and in the three Mythographi Vaticani.
2.3) Allegorical and moral exegesis in commentaries on Ovid’s Metamorphoses (12th-14th centuries).

3) The classics in the Italian literature of the Middle Ages and in commentaries to Dante
3.1) The dialogue with Antiquity in Italian literature and art of the 13th-14th centuries: imitation and rewriting of classical sources; reuse of images and metaphors taken from the Antiquity.
3.2) The relationship between the mythographic and allegorical tradition and the Dante’s revival of classical myths.
3.3) Commenting with the classics: the use of classical sources in ancient commentaries and illustrations to Dante’s Comedy.

4) Ancient and Islamic philosophy, vernacular literatures
4.1) Ancient philosophy and its Arabic mediation in Romance literature, between continuity and variations.
4.2) The translation of philosophical texts and their relationships with vernacular literatures.
4.3) The concepts of "philosopher" and "philosophy" in Romance literature.
4.4) The re-elaboration of ancient material in the formation of new concepts such as interiority, artistic "creation" and geographic-mythical representations.

The conference will include the participation, as keynote speakers, of four internationally renowned scholars who have dealt with the themes proposed here, and whose research interests reflect the fourfold articulation of our program:

- Claudia Villa (University of Bergamo – Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa), a medieval and humanist philologist specialised in the study of classical authors’ circulation in the Middle Ages and vernacular culture;
- Claudia Cieri Via (Sapienza University of Rome), an art historian and scholar of iconography and iconology, whose research has focussed on the fortune of Ovid’s Metamorphoses between the 15th and 16th centuries;
- Marco Petoletti (Catholic University of the Sacred Heart of Milan), who is author of numerous essays about medieval epigraphy, ancient commentaries on Dante’s Comedy, Latin literature of the 14th century, with particular reference to Dante, Petrarca and Boccaccio;
- Paolo Falzone (Sapienza University of Rome), who dedicated a large part of his scientific production to the intertwinement of philosophy, theology and politics in Dante’s works.

Proposals (in Italian or English) accompanied by a title, an abstract (of a maximum length of 4000 characters) and a curriculum vitae et studiorum (maximum 3000 characters) must be sent in two separate files to the address aereperennius@sns.it. Each paper should be no longer than twenty minutes.

Requests to participate must be sent by 30 June 2019 and will be submitted to the selection of the organising committee which will communicate the acceptance of the proposals by e-mail by 20 July 2019. The contributions will then be subjected to a rigorous peer-review process in view of the publication of the proceedings. Participation in the Conference is free. The organisation will not provide for the reimbursement of travel and accommodation expenses, but it will provide information on available accommodation.

The organising committee: Susanna Barsotti; Arianna Brunori; Ilaria Ottria; Paola Tricomi; Marina Zanobi

Call: https://www.fabula.org/actualites/aere-perennius-il-dialogo-con-l-antico-fra-medioevo-e-prima-modernit-seminario-dottorale_91179.php

(CFP closed June 30, 2019)

 

 

HOME & HOMECOMINGS: 33RD BIENNIAL CONFERENCE OF THE CLASSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SOUTH AFRICA

University of Stellenbosch, South Africa: November 7-10, 2019

The Classical Association of South Africa (CASA) invites proposals for papers for its 33rd Biennial Conference, to be hosted by the Department of Ancient Studies at the University of Stellenbosch.

We invite submissions that focus on the conference theme "Homes & Homecomings" as well as individual proposals on other aspects of the classical world and its reception. Panels are strongly encouraged and should consist of 3 to 8 related papers put together by the panel chair. We also welcome postgraduate students currently busy with Master’s or Doctoral programmes to submit papers for a "work-in-progress" parallel session.

Please submit a paper title, an abstract (approximately 300 words), and author affiliation to Annemarie de Villiers at amdev@sun.ac.za. The deadline for proposals is 31 May 2019 extended deadline July 15, 2019.

Further information on conference fees and accommodation to follow in due course.

Call: http://www.casa-kvsa.org.za/Conference.htm

(CFP closed July 15, 2019)

 

 

[PANEL] THE RECEPTION OF GREEK SCULPTURE FROM ANTIQUITY UNTIL THE PRESENT

33rd Biennial Conference of The Classical Association of South Africa (see above for general CFP)

University of Stellenbosch, South Africa: November 7-10, 2019

We invite the submission of abstracts for sessions on the theme "The Reception of Greek Sculpture from Antiquity until the Present" as part of the 33rd biennial conference of The Classical Association of South Africa, to be held at Stellenbosch University, 7-10 November 2019. We welcome proposals concerning any aspects of the reception of Greek sculpture from antiquity up until the present.

Keynote Speakers include Prof. Andrew Stewart (Berkeley), Prof. Stanley Burstein, and Prof. Judith Mossman.

Papers in the session will be allotted approximately 20-25 minutes. Please submit an abstract of 200-300 words to Jessica Nitschke at jessnitschke@gmail.com. The deadline for abstracts is 20 May 2019. There is no website for the conference yet, but further details on the conference will be available soon.

Classical Association of South Africa website: http://www.casa-kvsa.org.za/Conference.htm

(CFP closed May 20, 2019)

 

 

#CFP THE 12TH ANNUAL BOSTON UNIVERSITY CLASSICAL STUDIES GRADUATE STUDENT CONFERENCE

Theme: Agency through the Ancients: Reception as Empowerment

Department of Classical Studies, Boston University: November 9, 2019

Keynote: Dr. Emily Allen-Hornblower, Rutgers University, and Mr. Marquis "I AM" McCray

The Department of Classical Studies at Boston University invites submissions of abstracts for the 12th Annual Graduate Student Conference. This year, the conference will examine how classical literature (broadly defined) is able to impart a profound sense of agency to the disenfranchised, especially in times of turmoil or persecution. Although we acknowledge that many nationalists, over the centuries and into the present day, have invoked the classics in order to advance their exclusionary agenda, we hope to demonstrate that the classics have the potential to heal, unite, and empower the marginalized. Therefore, this conference will explore the myriad ways in which those who have traditionally remained voiceless have discovered a safe harbor and a sense of solidarity through the literature of ancient Greece, Rome, Egypt, Babylon, etc. Special attention will be given to engagement with the ancient world by groups which have been historically underrepresented or outright excluded.

Possible submission topics include (but are by no means limited to) the reception of classical literature by the following groups or individuals:

* Victims of war (e.g.. Milo Rau’s recent production of the Oresteia in Mosul)
* Veterans (e.g. Theater of War)
* Widowed wives (e.g. Alcyone from Mary Zimmerman’s Metamorphoses)
* Prisoners (e.g. The Medea Project, prison teaching programs like NJ-STEP)
* Women/feminist groups (e.g. Emily Wilson’s translation of the Odyssey)
* Racial minorities (e.g. ‘Antigone in Ferguson’)
* LGBTQ+ communities (e.g. Iphis and Tiresias as trans symbols)
* Those living with physical or mental disabilities (e.g. CripAntiquity)

Papers must be original, unpublished, and written by current graduate students. Please send an abstract (500 words or fewer), a paper title, and a C.V. or short bio to Maya Chakravorty, Peter Kotiuga, Alicia Matz, Joshua Paul, and Amanda Rivera at ancientagency@gmail.com. Papers should be 20 minutes in length and will be followed by a short question and answer session. The deadline for submissions is Friday, August 23, 2019. Selected speakers will be notified by the end of September and are expected to accept or decline the offer within a week of notification.

Call: https://listserv.liv.ac.uk/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind1906&L=CLASSICISTS&P=112955

 

 

ON THE MARGINS OF MYTH: HYBRIDISATION OF CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY IN CONTEMPORARY MASS CULTURE ~~ EN LOS MÁRGENES DEL MITO: HIBRIDACIONES DE LA MITOLOGÍA CLÁSICA EN LA CULTURA DE MASAS CONTEMPORÁNEA

Department of Classical Philology, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid: November 11-13, 2019

Amazons, centaurs, lamias, fauns, sirens, satyrs, Medusa, androgynous beings… Since the dawn of Western civilisation, classical myths have provided us with examples of liminal identities and hybrid beings on the margins between the human and the animal, the human and the divine, the masculine and the feminine. Very often, mythical stories offer accounts of alternative sexualities (Narcissus), gender fluidity (Tiresias), impossible carnal relations (such as those involving Zeus under the disguise of different animals), and gender utopias (the Amazons). All these narrations had precise, exemplary, and normative functions in the societies that created them, functions that continue to be the subject of an ongoing debate. In the context of such discussions on the subject, the research project Marginalia Classica Hodierna invites your consideration of the implications and uses of the concept of “hybridisation” as it surfaces in a wide range of retellings of classical myths in different formats of contemporary mass culture: films, music, comics, popular fiction, videogames, advertising, etc. In their variety, all these formats tend to mutually interact and to favour the reappropriation of content from both high and low cultures. But that is not all: they also question the norm and promote the de-hierarchisation of certain models, thus functioning as a vehicle for the expression of countercultural ideas, and, subsequently, giving voice to mainstream culture’s notions and perspectives.

Drawing on these premises, the conference invites proposals that develop, preferably, though not exclusively, issues such as:

* What are the defining features of the deviation from the norm or of the monstrosity that these myths portray? What are these myths used for in the new artefacts of contemporary mass culture?
* How are these stories re-signified? In what ways do they reinforce or subvert the norm?
* What possibilities do these “hybridisation myths” offer for the construction of alternative identities (group, ethnic, sexual, gender...)?
* Through what means and methods are myths re-appropriated in these formats? How is that accomplished, considering that this material is traditionally associated with high culture?
* ...

By discussing these and other related topics, the conference seeks to encourage reflection on the following: what are the dynamics and the agents that allow us to explain the uses, reworkings and reformulations to which these classical myths “on the margins” are put today? To what extent does classical myth respond to the demands of the contemporary world? What are the advantages of using myth in such ways? Ultimately, we wonder about the reasons that might explain the ability of classical myth to appeal to the most intimate concerns of today’s society. In so doing, we also seek to explore the role they play in the reflection of contemporary concerns.

Those interested in attending are invited to send an abstract (in Spanish, English, Italian, French or German) of no more than 300 words (bibliographical references included) to marginaliaclassicahodierna@gmail.com. This document should be sent no later than 30 April 2019. Papers must not exceed the 20-minutes limit. Poster proposals are also accepted, and prospective participants should send a summary of no more than 100 words to the above-mentioned address. All applicants will be notified of either acceptance or rejection by 20 May 2019.

Call: http://marginaliaclassica.es/events/en-los-margenes-del-mito-hibridaciones-de-la-mitologia-clasica-en-la-cultura-de-masas-contemporanea/

(CFP closed April 30, 2019)

 

 

[PANEL/S] ANTIQUI-TECH: INVENTION IN (AND OF) THE ANCIENT MEDITERRANEAN WORLD ON SCREEN

The 2019 Film & History Conference. Theme: Designing Culture and Character - Technology in Film, Television, and New Media

Madison, WI (USA): November 13-17, 2019

Invention has fascinated audiences at least since the god Hephaestus created self-locomoting robot-women as workshop assistants—and Prometheus’ theft of fire allowed humans to develop their own technology. From Méliès’ re-creation of Lucian’s trip to the moon, to myriad takes on Pygmalion fabricating the “perfect woman,” to Hypatia’s fatal scientific inquiry in Amenábar’s Agora, on-screen depictions of invention and technology in the ancient Mediterranean world and the classical tradition have dramatized their potential to delight, empower, and enlighten—as well as the ethical and moral concerns they stimulate.

How do invention and technology stabilize or disrupt social order or tradition—for good or ill? What happens when new tech supplants the once-new? We enjoy the wit of Percy Jackson substituting an iPhone’s reflective surface for Perseus’ shield; can the wonder Ray Harryhausen wrought in Jason & the Argonauts survive the domination of green-screen motion capture animation? What aesthetic or ethical questions arise from eliding realism and the hyperreal in generating Spartan musculature, the Roman Colosseum, or the Olympians? Conversely, is democratization of knowledge spurring viewers’ expectations of “authenticity” in on-screen representations of technology in antiquity, e.g. in architecture or warfare—and if so, to what effects? How does film as a technology rival e.g. archaeology in representing the “reality” of the past?

The Classical Antiquity area solicits abstracts for papers that discuss how film, television, and various other screen-media engage with technology and invention, on topics including, but not limited to:

* representation of invention/technology in narratives set in the ancient Mediterranean world, or informed by the classical tradition (e.g. through plot, character, theme, mise en scène)
* how technology figures in characterization, in combination with morality, racial or cultural identity, and/or the social status of its inventors and/or users
* the ethics of invention/technology within on-screen narratives and in the creation of convincingly realistic or hyperreal worlds on screen
* innovation/technological invention as metaphor for generational or cultural succession
* audience (in)tolerance of anachronisms/interest in “authentic” on-screen worlds

Proposals for complete panels of three related presentations are also welcome, but should include an abstract and contact information (including email) for each presenter.

Please e-mail your proposal (200-400 words per paper) to the area chair: Meredith Safran - classicsonscreen@gmail.com

DEADLINE for abstracts: 1 June 2019

Call: https://camws.org/node/1378

Conference website: http://www.filmandhistory.org/

(CFP closed June 1, 2019)

 

 

[PANEL] GRECO-ROMAN ANTIQUITY IN GAMES

Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association (PAMLA) Meeting

San Diego, CA, USA: November 14-17, 2019

This panel seeks to stimulate and further conversation about how Greco-Roman traditions have been put to use in games—video games, board games, and role-playing games (RPGs). While some scholarship on this topic has emerged in the past decade, major questions remain open: how do games use Mediterranean antiquity? how do they enable players to imagine themselves into ancient spaces, playing at being ‘Greek’ or ‘Roman’? and how might such imaginative spaces challenge the way we theorize classical receptions? We invite papers examining the reception of ancient Greek and Roman materials (literature, history, philosophy, art history, etc.) in games of any format, including video games, board games, and RPGs.

Organisers: Benjamin Stevens (Trinity University), Brett Rogers (University of Puget Sound)

PAMLA Conference: http://pamla.org/2019

Call/Abstract portal: https://pamla.ballastacademic.com/Home/S/17947.

 

 

ORDER‽ ART, CLASSICISM, AND DISCOURSE, FROM 1755 TO TODAY

Henry Moore Institute, Leeds, United Kingdom: November 15-16, 2019

In 1851 the Jury for Sculpture at the Great Exhibition shared their criteria for works of art in their class:

"They have looked for originality of invention, more or less happily expressed in that style which has for twenty-three centuries been the wonder of every civilised people, and the standard of excellence to which artists of the highest order have endeavoured to attain."

In so many words, the esteemed gentlemen of the Jury (and they were all gentlemen) demanded of their sculptors one thing - classicism, or the antique. Fewer than a hundred years earlier, Johann Joachim Winckelmann’s writings on the art of the ancient world had promoted a systematic, ordered idea of the progress of art; less than a hundred years later, the aftermath of World War I caused artists to invoke a return to order across Europe - a return to classicism, stability, and the simplicity of antiquity. Today, the classics, classicism, and antiquity are still hotly contested visual, literary and cultural forms and norms.

But what is ordered about ‘classicism’? Who benefits from an ordered, stable canon of classicism in art and literature? Is classicism, in art, architecture, archaeology and academia truly the realm of the dead white men (to borrow from the title of Donna Zuckerberg’s 2018 book, Not All Dead White Men)? This conference seeks to challenge, reassess, and provoke discussion on the position of ‘classicism’ in art following Winckelmann’s seminal text on the topic in 1755 through to the present day. Winckelmann’s ordered, teleological histories of art have been thrown into disarray by 265 years of new archaeological discoveries; every generation develops its own ‘classic’ and its own canon. Technologies of communication, dissemination, modification, and reproduction offer artists and academics new media for their engagement with classicism, art, and the world; previously unrepresented populations and individuals have more access to academia, art, and classics than ever before, but not without opposition.

Responding to recent publications, exhibitions, and discussions in art history, classics, and contemporary society and politics, this conference seeks to interrogate classicisms in art (broadly conceived on both fronts). This event follows recent projects like the Classical Now exhibition at King’s College London (2017/18), Rodin and the Art of Ancient Greece at the British Museum (2018), and scholarship on the use of antiquity in contemporary discourse. We will not look to construct a new order or return to an old, but to challenge, explore, and activate new discussions on the use, abuse, and reuse of ‘classicism’ through history and today. Furthermore, in a historic moment of increased fascism and nationalism, this conference offers an opportunity to publicly interrogate the role classics, classicism, and the reception of antiquity in art has had in upholding oppressive power structures. This event will be held alongside a Henry Moore Institute retrospective exhibition of the work of Edward Allington (1951-2017), an exhibition that will consider the creative engagement of Allington with the cultures of classicism.

Within this framework we invite submissions of 250-300 words from scholars and artists at every career level for papers on topics involving classicism and art from 1755 to today. Preference will be given to papers that highlight or focus on sculptural material, with a broad definition of ‘sculpture’. Suggested themes include, but are by no means limited to:

* Gendered uses of classicism in art
* Queer classicisms
* Non-Western classicisms
* Contemporary art practice and uses of ‘classicism’
* Problematic or challenging ‘classical’ objects
* Canon and canonising
* The classical/anti-classical and politics
* Nationalism, internationalism and empire
* Narrative, title and text as ordering principles

Please send abstracts and a brief bio to Kirstie Gregory (kirstie.gregory@henry-moore.org) and Dr Melissa Gustin (mlg519@york.ac.uk) by 8 April 2019 extended deadline 15 April 2019.

A postgraduate/early career scholar workshop will precede the conference on the morning of Friday 15 November offering PGR/ECRs working in any discipline on issues of classicism, canon, and antiquity the opportunity to meet their peers and foster new networks. The workshop will invite delegates to give short, informal presentations about their work, offer feedback to their peers, and make connections before attending the conference. Postgraduate students are welcome to submit abstracts for the conference as well as participating in the workshop.

Call: https://www.henry-moore.org/research/opportunities/call-for-papers/order-art-classicism-and-discourse-from-1755-to-today

(CFP ended April 15, 2019)

 

 

#CFP III YOUNG RESEARCHERS CONFERENCE ANIWEH – V SHRA: RECEPTIONS OF ANTIQUITY FROM THE MIDDLE AGES TO THE CONTEMPORARY WORLD

University of the Basque Country, Vitoria-Gasteiz, Basque Country, Spain: November 20, 2019

ANIWEH research project (https://aniho.hypotheses.org/) along with SHRA project invites submissions of abstracts for the III Young Researchers Conference ANIWEH – V SHRA: Receptions of Antiquity from the Middle Ages to the Contemporary World. The meeting is scheduled for November 20 in the Faculty of Arts at the University of the Basque Country, located in Vitoria-Gasteiz (Basque Country, Spain).

The deadline for submissions is Friday, September 20, 2019.

Find all the information about the CFP on our webpage: https://aniho.hypotheses.org/1539

 

 

#CFP WARFARE IN ANTIQUITY CONFERENCE: PERCEPTIONS, REALITIES, AND RECEPTION IN THE 21ST CENTURY

Kings College London, UK: November 23, 2019

Warfare in antiquity has captivated academics and enthusiasts alike for millennia. Several works, including specialist manuals (e.g. Asclepiodotus’ Tactics; Vegetius’ Epitome of Military Science) and historiographical discussions (e.g. Caesar’s Commentaries; Procopius’ History of the Wars), indicate clearly that ancient societies were fascinated by the workings of both contemporary and earlier methods of warfare. This interest has endured all the way to the modern era and has yielded a much deeper understanding of ancient warfare from various perspectives. Academic movements like the ‘face of battle’ studies started by John Keegan in the 1970s and the ‘war and society’ publications in the 1990s are prime examples of how our understanding of ancient warfare continues to evolve. With the emergence and flourishing of ‘specialised’ academic research in the past two decades, the study of warfare in antiquity has grown into as diverse a discipline as the cultures it aims to study. The ‘specialisation’ trend of academia has afforded both academics and enthusiasts the opportunity to delve deeper and challenge long held perceptions and assumptions. Such challenges have the potential to shift (or in some cases reaffirm) the way modern scholars understand warfare in antiquity.

Recognizing the tremendous work being done on warfare in antiquity and considering the lack of platforms afforded to academics and enthusiasts to discuss their respective research and interests this academic year, we are proud to announce the Warfare in Antiquity Conference. We invite those interested to submit proposals that discuss various aspects of warfare in the ancient world, in particular those in a dialogue with established schools of thought in and perceptions of the discipline. The event is focused upon realities, in terms of both the ancient armed forces and ancient conceptions of their experiences, and also modern scholarship, with new hypotheses and arguments building upon and challenging accepted theories. We cordially invite proposals on all aspects of ancient warfare, particularly those which deal with the conference themes of Perceptions, Realities, and Reception.

Proposals should include a 300 word abstract along with a few words about the applicant – their research interests, university affiliation and / or status etc. Separately in the body of the email, please provide your full name, contact email address and university affiliation.

The conference will be held on SATURDAY NOVEMBER 23RD 2019, AT KING'S COLLEGE LONDON.

The DEADLINE for submissions will be 5 P.M. on AUGUST 31ST, 2019.

Please send all submissions for papers as a Word Document to WACon2019@gmail.com

Call: https://listserv.liv.ac.uk/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind1907&L=CLASSICISTS&P=12904

 

 

MEANING, MEMORY, AND MOVEMENT: ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL SPACES

University of Birmingham, UK: November 23-24, 2019

The process of stopping and looking back at the past through new methodological lenses over the last half-century has comprised a series of fruitful cross-disciplinary ‘turns’. These retrospective global movements have provided academia with innovative ways of shedding light on past civilisations through a shared analytical model that prioritises a specific focus. During the second half of the twentieth century the ‘turn to space’ found its roots in erudite thinkers such as Foucault and Lefebvre who positioned space as a critical analytical tool for understanding social existence in the areas of geography, urban planning, and architecture. In recent years, this framework has found cadence throughout the social sciences and humanities and has transitioned from being an experimental, innovative, sometimes controversial tool, to a necessary critical model for studies of the past. The intention of our conference is to (re)turn again to space and to stimulate fresh conversations across temporal and cultural disciplinary boundaries through collective spatial analysis.

Our tripartite conference name encapsulates the broad and valuable facets of recent approaches to the study of space: spaces contain, facilitate, and organise meaning for societies, they perpetuate, (re)construct, and direct memory, and movement through and around space underpins these processes. Furthermore, the obvious opportunity for overlapping angles and approaches is indicative of the fluidity of these multifaceted constructs and the incongruity of a ‘correct’ interpretation of space.

We believe in juxtaposing approaches and perspectives from different temporal, cultural, and geographical contexts in order to elicit cross-disciplinary dissemination, networking, and productivity. Therefore, we envisage grouping together temporally divergent papers into a number of focussed thematic panels. We hope to support a productive interdisciplinary environment that will enable researchers to, on the one hand, look retrospectively at their research in a new light, and on the other, to consider innovative approaches to their future research avenues. We invite abstracts for papers, from Postgraduate and Early Career Researchers, on an intentionally broad range of themes:

– Spaces of cultural memory: how do spaces contain and perpetuate memories, develop self and collective conceptions of culture, and shape identities?
– Organising space: how are spatial borders articulated? How are they internally ordered? How are spaces framed, deframed and reframed? What are the intended and unintended consequences of spatial organisation?
– Liminal spaces: from geographical and cultural borders to micro level entrances and exits of certain sites and sights.
– Spatial taxonomy and typology: how do we define space – political, religious, private, public, etc.?
– Gendered spaces: how does gender operate and develop within space(s)?
– Representation of spaces: comparing and contrasting between literary, visual, material and archaeological media.
– Movement and space: space and time, processional movement, traversing, lustrating, navigating, entering and leaving. How does movement generate space?

Confirmed Keynote Speaker: Prof. Diana Spencer (University of Birmingham)

(more to be announced)

Proposals should be submitted as an abstract of no more than 300 words and should be accompanied by a short bio (no more than 100 words) indicating the speaker’s current position, location, and research interests. These should be sent to a.m.spacesconference@gmail.com by the 16th August 2019. Our team will evaluate proposals and respond to candidates by the end of August and provide a preliminary idea of the themed panel they will be allocated to. We look forward to reading your proposals and hearing about your research.

The Organising Committee: Ben Salisbury (University of Birmingham); Ben White (University of Nottingham - Lead Organiser); Curtis Lisle (University of Birmingham); Liam McLeod (University of Birmingham); Thomas Quigley (University of Manchester); Chris Rouse (University of Birmingham).

Twitter: @SpaceConference

Call: https://amspaces.wordpress.com/call-for-papers/

(CFP closed August 16, 2019)

 

 

#CFP THIRD INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE IN ANCIENT FRAGMENTARY DRAMA "THE FORGOTTEN THEATRE

University of Turin, Italy: November 26-29, 2019

The Centro Studi sul Teatro Classico – University of Turin (www.teatroclassico.unito.it) is delighted to circulate the CALL FOR PAPERS for the Third International Conference in Ancient Fragmentary Drama "The Forgotten Theatre" - University of Turin, 26th-29th of November 2019.

THE CONFERENCE: School education has consecrated, since ancient times, a canon of dramatic theatrical works capable of representing wonderfully the genius and essence of Greco-Roman theatre. This canon has helped direct scholars’ attention to some works of dramatic literature at the expense of the ancient tragedians and playwrights, causing a critical oversight of some works within the tradition of classical theatre - long considered to be of lesser value - especially those preserved in a fragmentary fashion or known by an indirect tradition. The International Conference The Forgotten Theatre aims, for the third consecutive year, to be a stimulus to revitalize academic interest in fragmentary Greco-Roman dramatic texts, long relegated to the sidelines of scientific research and contemporary theatre productions. The conference will host academics at any stage of their career, who wish to collaborate in order to cast new light on the forgotten theatre through their studies.

TOPICS OF DISCUSSION - The conference will accept some papers concerning primarily, but not exclusively, the following research areas:

* Criticism, commentary and constitutio textus of fragmentary dramatic Greek and Latin works, both tragic and comic;
* Well-reasoned attempts to reconstruct the plot of tragedies (or entire trilogies/ tetralogies) that are either fragmentary, incomplete or known by indirect tradition.
* New considerations of matters concerning the contents and representations of fragmentary dramas, with special emphasis given to evidence of-fered by internal captions, marginalia and scholia;
* The development of Greek and Latin dramatic genres with particular attention to the influence exerted on them by other forms of mimetic art (such as kitharodia, dance, mime);
* Research on minor Greek, Latin, Magna Graecia and Etruscan theatrical traditions;
* The use of iconographic, epigraphic, archaeological, papyrological and codicological sources in the study of ancient drama;
* The contribution of historical-anthropological disciplines (anthropology, historiography, philosophy, psychology) to the study of ancient drama;
* The reception of the Greco-Roman drama in the arts and literature of later periods (in imperial, late imperial, medieval and Byzantine times).

CONFERENCE ORGANISATION - The conference days will develop according to the following days and programme:

* Tuesday 26th - Wednesday 27th November‬ The Forgotten Theatre - PGR and PhD students conference Two days of study with 12 speakers selected through the present call. In these first two days of conference, papers from PGR, PhD or recently graduated students will be delivered. The sessions will be chaired by Professors affiliated to the Centro Studi sul Teatro Classico who will give an introduction and guide the discussion following the papers.

* 28th ‪Thursday- Friday 29th November‬‬‬‬ The Forgotten Theatre - main conference Two days of study with 14 speakers both selected through the present call and invited by the Centro Studi sul Teatro Classico; in this second part of the conference, papers from researchers and scholars will be delivered. The sessions will be organised according to the aforementioned methods.

Each paper presentation will last about 20 minutes, followed by 10 minutes of discussion. Candidates are kindly requested to follow these instructions meticulously, with due regard for the other speakers and organisers. The conference will be broadcast live on the Youtube channel of the Centro Studi sul Teatro Classico. In accordance with the best judgment of the Scientific Committee, the Proceedings of the Conference will be published by the Centre for Studies in Greek and Roman Theatre.

HOW TO PARTICIPATE - Those who wish to participate in the activities must submit the following to teatro.classico@unito.it no later than August 31, 2019:

* An abstract of the proposed papers, complete with a title. The document must not contain the author's name in any part and must have a maximum length of 300 words. The abstract can be written in Italian or in English;

* A brief curriculum vitae et studiorum (no more than one page) which highlights the affiliation of the speaker and their main publications. The official languages of the conference will be Italian and English.

The Scientific committee of the conference, chaired by Professor Francesco Carpanelli, will evaluate each paper received and will inform all candidates about the final program of the conference by September 2019.

ECONOMIC ASPECTS: In order to guarantee free and democratic access to knowledge and research, participation in the activities as speakers or as listeners will not entail the payment of any fee. All speakers and listeners will be guaranteed refreshments in between every activity session, as well as the provision of the necessary educational material (handout, stationery). Speakers will be guaranteed lunches for the duration of the whole conference. Unfortunately, due to the known economic hardships faced by the Italian University system, the organisation will not able to guarantee other forms of refund; exceptions can be made for particular cases (e.g. for speakers who cannot ask for reimbursement to their own institution or whose research is not funded). The organisation will provide details on the structures affiliated with the University of Turin that offer accommodations at reasonable prices.

SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE: Francesco CARPANELLI (Torino) coordinator Federica BESSONE, (Torino), Simone BETA (Siena), Francesco Paolo BIANCHI (Frei-burg), Adele Teresa COZZOLI (Roma Tre), Giorgio IERANÒ (Trento), Enrico V. MALTESE (Torino) Michele NAPOLITANO (Cassino e L.M.), Bernhard ZIMMERMANN (Freiburg).

CONTACTS: For any further information please do not hesitate to contact Luca Austa, conference organiser, sending an email to: teatro.classico@unito.it.

Deadline: 31st of August 2019

Call: http://www.teatroclassico.unito.it/it/content/convegno-%C2%AB-forgotten-theatre-2019%C2%BB

 

 

ANNUAL MEETING OF POSTGRADUATES IN RECEPTION OF THE ANCIENT WORLD (AMPRAW)

AMPRAW 2019 - AUTHORITY AND LEGITIMACY

Radboud University, Nijmegen (The Netherlands): November 28-30, 2019

With great pleasure we announce our Call for Papers for this year's Annual Meeting for Postgraduates in the Reception of the Ancient World (AMPRAW).

AMPRAW is an annual conference that is designed to bring together early-career researchers in the field of classical reception studies, and will be held for the ninth consecutive year. It aims to contribute to the growth of an international network of PhDs working on classical reception(s), as well as to strengthen relationships between early career researchers and established academics.

AMPRAW 2019 will be held at Radboud University, Nijmegen (the Netherlands) from Thursday 28 to Saturday 30 November 2019, in collaboration with OIKOS (National Research School in Classical Studies), NKV (National Association for all interested in Classical Studies) and Brill Publishers. The programme includes two conference days, and an optional cultural excursion on the third day. It is organized by and for postgraduates and early career researchers working in all areas of classical reception. Thanks to generous contributions of our sponsors, there will be no conference fee. Besides that, we offer a limited number of travel bursaries to speakers without research budgets or with limited funding. Lunch and coffee breaks will be provided to all speakers.

Confirmed keynote speakers:
* Dr Justine McConnell (University College London, United Kingdom)
* Dr David Rijser (University of Groningen, the Netherlands)
* Dr Nathalie de Haan (Radboud University Nijmegen, the Netherlands)

The conference will further involve contributions by specialists from Radboud University and OIKOS.

This year's theme: Authority and Legitimacy.

Classical reception has always and invariably been linked to the concept of authority. The very idea of the 'classical' involves the establishment of an authoritative canon (or canons), which is renegotiated and recreated throughout time. Furthermore, aspects from the classical world, or what is perceived as such, have always functioned as authoritative examples in various cultural processes and narratives. Closely related to authority is the concept of legitimacy. Throughout history, classical antiquity has been quoted, excerpted, and framed to claim legitimacy. From the Franks under the Carolingians to the modern 'alt-right' movements, all claim legitimacy with reference to a certain idea of classical authority.

We invite papers of 20-25 minutes dealing in all possible ways with the following questions:

* What exactly constitutes the authority of Classical Antiquity?
* Where, when and why has it gained, or lost, its legitimacy?
* What are the structures behind the formation of an authoritative canon?
* How have people tried to maintain or subvert 'classical' authority: which social negotiations are at play?
* How do classical precedents function in historical and modern-day issues and mechanisms of power and legitimacy?
* How do classical examples function as anchors in new developments and innovation? In other words, how can new ideas obtain legitimacy by being anchored upon authoritative examples?
* How do the concepts of authority and legitimacy function in European and non-European reception of classical antiquity?

We encourage proposals in the fields of, but not limited to, archaeology, literary studies, linguistics, (art) history, media studies, religious studies, cultural sciences, history of law and political science, dealing with all time periods. The conference will be held in English.

If you would like to present a paper at AMPRAW 2019, please send an abstract of around 200 words to ampraw2019@ru.nl before May 20th 2019, together with a short biography stating your name, affiliation, and contact address. Please indicate in your submission whether you would like to apply for a travel bursary. Applicants will be selected and notified before the end of June.

For more information, visit: https://www.ru.nl/hlcs/conferences/ampraw-2019/ampraw-2019/.

(CFP closed May 20, 2019)

Previous AMPRAW conferences:
2018: University of Coimbra, Portugal: November 8-​10 2018. https://ampraw2018.wixsite.com/home/.
2017: University of Edinburgh: 23-24 November 2017 - https://ampraw.wixsite.com/ampraw2017. Twitter: @ampraw2017
2016: University of Oxford: 12-13 December 2016 - https://amprawoxford.wordpress.com/
2015: University of Nottingham: 14-15 December 2015 - ampraw2015.wordpress.com/ - Twitter: @AMPRAW2015
2014: University of London: 24-25 November 2014 - ampraw2014.wordpress.com/.
2013: University of Exeter.
2012: University of Birmingham.
2011: University College London.

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December 2019

#CFP HOMER SEMINAR X: HOMER AND THE EPIC TRADITION

Australian National University, Canberra: December 2-3, 2019

Sonia Pertsinidis and Elizabeth Minchin wish to draw attention to the tenth iteration of ANU’s Homer Seminar: Homer and the Epic Tradition. The dates for the Seminar are Monday 2 and Tuesday 3 December 2019.

The special guest is Dr Maureen Alden (Queen’s University, Belfast) and author of two important books on the Homeric epics: Homer Beside Himself: Para-narratives in the Iliad (OUP, 2000) and Para-Narratives in the Odyssey: Stories in the Frame (OUP, 2017).

They invite papers on all aspects of ancient epic, Greek and Roman, and its reception.

If you are interested in giving a paper, please contact Sonia (sonia.pertsinidis@anu.edu.au) or Elizabeth (elizabeth.minchin@anu.edu.au) before 30 September 2019. If you are interested in attending, please contact them before 31 October.

Call: https://www.facebook.com/anu.classics.ancient.history/posts/2326854917366097

 

 

5TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE: A LITERATURA CLÁSSICA OU OS CLÁSSICOS NA LITERATURA: PRESENÇAS CLÁSSICAS NAS LITERATURAS DE LÍNGUA PORTUGUESA

School of Arts and Humanities of the University of Lisbon, Portugal: December 2-4, 2019

The Centre for Classical Studies at the School of Arts and Humanities of the University of Lisbon invites scholars interested in discussing and approaching ideas on thematic reconfiguration, values, cultural horizon and texts of Classical Antiquity (alongside characters, literary culture and poetics, Greek and Latin stories and fiction), regarding different settings in time and space in which literature is written in the Portuguese language to submit their conference abstracts until the 28th of July, 2019.

Conference abstracts must include:
- title of the presentation (clear and informative);
- abstract (up to 300 words);
- author’s name;
- affiliation;
- contact email address;
- brief academic curriculum (up to 300 words).

Contact email address for abstract submission and further information: literaturaclassica@letras.ulisboa.pt.

Registration: The registration fee for the conference is €100 (€70 for postgraduate students).

Scientific Committee:
Arnaldo do Espírito Santo
Cristina Pimentel
José Augusto Cardoso Bernardes
José Ribeiro Ferreira
Paolo Fedeli
Paula Morão
Sérgio Nazar David
Thomas Earle

Organizing Committee
Coordinators: Cristina Pimentel and Paula Morão
Alice Costa
Maria Luísa Resende
Ricardo Nobre
Rui Carlos Fonseca

Call: https://www.letras.ulisboa.pt/pt/agenda/cfp-v-coloquio-a-literatura-classica-ou-os-classicos-na-literatura-presencas-classicas-nas-literaturas-de-lingua-portuguesa

(CFP closed 28 July, 2019)

 

 

NEW CLASSICISTS CONFERENCE. THEME: COLLABORATION AND/OR NEW TECHNIQUES IN THE CLASSICS

King’s College London: December 7, 2019

We are pleased to announce the call for papers for our inaugural postgraduate conference series. The theme for this conference will be: Collaboration and/or New Techniques in the Classics.

Topics can be on any aspect of the Ancient World and must include, but are not limited to, at least one of the following:

* Departmental, interdisciplinary &/or interuniversity collaboration, where at least 1 PG student is the lead between members of staff or other student(s)
* New (interdisciplinary) cognitive &/or theoretical perspectives
* The use of new STEM techniques in Classics PG research, such as:
    - Agent-based modelling
    - Network theory & analysis
    - Database compilation, creation and dissemination
    - Critical theories, methods & practices in Digital Humanities
    - Environmental & lifespan analysis

Papers presented will be up to 25 minutes long, followed by 10 minutes of questions. Papers can be presented by more than 1 person, but the lead must be a postgraduate student. Papers presented will also be considered for inclusion into a special ‘Conference Edition’ of our journal, once the peer reviewing process has taken place.

Please submit your proposals/abstracts, up to 300 words, by Friday June 28, 2019 to: submissions@newclassicists.com.

(Edit 20/7/2019) Program:

0930 Welcome
0940 Guest Speaker: Dr Abigail Graham (ICS) - Title tbc
1020 Paul Kelly (KCL) - Risk and return in Roman Egypt
1055 Break
1110 Konstantin Schulz (HU Berlin) - CALLIDUS: A database of exercises for learning Latin
1145 Benjamin Wilck (HU Berlin) - Hidden messages in Greek mathematics: Results of a statistical analysis of linguistic regularities in Euclid's Elements
1230 Lunch & Poster Presentations
1340 Giulia Frigerio (Kent) - The impact of the laurel on Apolline divination: Affecting the mind without the use of drugs
1415 Noga Erez-Yodfat (Ben-Gurion) - Senses and the embodied mind of the mystes in ancient mystery cults
1450 Mark McCahill (Glasgow) - The ancient senses and Roman ritual: Considering imagines as memory objects in an interdisciplinary context
1525 Break
1540 Samuel Agbamu (KCL) - Classics and the Poverty of Philosophy
1615 Vivienne McGlashan (Bristol) - The Bacchants are silent: Applying cognitive approaches to explore ritual maenadism
1650 Nathalie Choubineh (Reading) - Kinetography: A methodological framework for reading kinetic motifs in the Greek vase-painting
1730 Drinks Reception

Free event. Book: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/new-classicists-conference-tickets-65027222172

For more information, please do not hesitate to contact us by visiting:
www.newclassicists.com
www.facebook.com/newclassicists
@NewClassicists

Call: https://www.newclassicists.com/conferences

(CFP closed June 28, 2019)

 

 

RECEPTION, PRODUCTION, EXCHANGE

Australasian Universities Languages & Literature Association (AULLA) and Australian Reception Network (ARN)

University of Wollongong, NSW, Australia: December 9-11, 2019

Texts live only by being read, yet in being read, they are also transformed. Texts may be read closely or distantly, critically or uncritically, deeply or hyperly, fast or slowly; for pleasure, profit, or piety; on the beach, in the library, or in the university classroom. Texts can have long afterlives, travelling far in time and space on circuits of communication and exchange. They can be given new life in new contexts of reception, interpretation, translation, or adaptation.

This conference examines the ways in which texts (both literary and otherwise) are produced, exchanged, and received. We encourage papers with a focus on engaged studies and discussions of teaching practice and of critical/exegetical responses to creative practice. Papers that respond to reception, production, and exchange in the fields of languages and translation studies; the literary study of languages other than English; and philosophical approaches to cultural expression, are expressly welcome. We also expressly welcome interdisciplinary angles on the theme, such as Cultural Studies, Indigenous Studies, Postcolonial Studies, ethnography, sociology of reading, History of the Book, studies in orality or performance, and comparative approaches.

Call for papers: the organisers welcome submissions for individual presentations of 20 minutes and panel sessions of 90 minutes.

Submissions received by Monday 29 April 2019 will be considered by the committee and outcomes will be announced by 13 May 2019, to enable funding applications to be made in good time. All submissions are due by Monday 30 September 2019, and the program will be published in early November.

Submissions should include: name/s of author/s (including affiliations), title of presentation, an abstract of up to 200 words, and a biographical note of up to 50 words per author. Panel submissions should also include a short description of the panel theme (up to 150 words), in addition to titles, abstracts, and biographical notes for all papers.

Submissions should be emailed to aulla-conference@uow.edu.au.

Hosts: This conference is hosted by the University of Wollongong, the Australasian Universities Languages & Literature Association Conference, incorporating the inaugural Australian Reception Network Lecture, and will be held in Wollongong, Australia from 9th-11th December 2019.

About AULLA: The Australasian Universities Language and Literature Association (AULLA) is an international academic organisation that advances research in all fields of language and literature, including linguistics, film studies, philosophy of literature, creative exegeses, poetics, and cultural studies, in the tertiary institutions of Australia, New Zealand and the Asia-Pacific. AULLA is affiliated with the International Federation for Modern Languages and Literatures (FILLM) and the International Federation of the Societies of Classical Studies (FIEC). It was founded in 1950 as the Australasian Universities Modern Language Association and assumed its present title in 1957.

AULLA’s mission is to promote cross-disciplinary connections and synergies and to encourage innovative research directions in language, literature and cultural studies. To facilitate this, AULLA holds a biennial congress, focussed on a specific theme, that brings together scholars from all disciplines associated with the study and teaching of language and literature.

The Journal of Literature, Language and Culture (JLLC; formerly AUMLA) is the association’s journal. It has an international focus and is fully peer-reviewed. AUMLA was published twice yearly from 1953-2012. JLLC will be published in three issues per year from 2013.

The Sussex-Samuel Prize for Postgraduate Students is offered by AULLA to encourage postgraduate student participation in the broader scholarly community. The prize is awarded every two years for a paper presented at the AULLA congress by a postgraduate student and judged by a panel within the Executive to be significant, innovative and accomplished. The applicant must be a currently enrolled postgraduate research student. The author of the winning paper will receive a prize of AUD$800, and the paper will be developed for publication in JLLC. For more information visit the conference website.

About ARN: The Australian Reception Network was founded in July 2018 and has more than 70 members working on all aspects of literary reception studies, history, and theory. Its website is www.australianreceptionnetwork.com.

Call: http://aulla.com.au/reception-production-exchange/

(CFP closed April 29, 2019)

 

 

TRUE WARRIORS? NEGOTIATING DISSENT IN THE INTELLECTUAL DEBATE (c. 1100 – 1700)

9th Lectio International Conference - Leuven, Belgium: December, 11-13, 2019

Dissent, polemics and rivalry have always been at the center of intellectual development. The scholarly Streitkultur was given a fresh impetus by the newly founded universities in the High Middle Ages and later turned into a quintessential part of early modern intellectual life. It was not only mirrored in various well-known intellectual debates and controversies – e.g. between Aristotelians and Augustinians, scholastics and humanists, Catholics and Protestants – but also embodied in numerous literary genres and non-literary modes of expression – e.g. disputationes, invectives, consilia, images, carnivalesque parades, music, etc. – and discursive or political strategies – patronage, networks and alliances. Moreover, the harsh debates notwithstanding, consensus was also actively searched for, both within particular disciplines and within society as a whole.

The aforementioned genres and strategies are all modes of negotiating dissent, which raises several important questions regarding these intellectual ‘warriors’. What were the most important issues at stake and how were they debated? Did the debates in the public sphere reflect the private opinions of the scholars involved? What access do we have to those private opinions? Can we approach such controversies in terms of authenticity and truthfulness, or consistency and coherence? Is there a contrast between ego-documents and the published part of an author’s oeuvre?

Starting from these questions, the aim of this conference is to study the polemical strategies and the modes of rivalry and alliance in scholarly debate from the twelfth through the seventeenth centuries.

Topics of interest may include, but are not limited to:

* the role of alliances and polemics in establishing intellectual networks;
* the presentation of rivaling views and the depiction of adversaries;
* the discrepancy or congruency between private and public persona;
* hitherto neglected disputes or new perspectives on well-known controversies;
* non-literary modes of negotiating dissent;
* the relation and connections between various literary and non-literary genres, also across different semiotic modes (literature, visual arts, performative arts, ...);
* the role of socio-cultural and economic background in polemics;
* the role of language (e.g.: vernacular vs. Latin);
* similarities and differences across disciplines (philosophy, civil and canon law, theology, medicine...) with regard to polemization and the negotiation of dissent.

We actively invite papers from a variety of perspectives and disciplines (civil and canon law, philosophy, theology and religious studies, literary studies, historiography, art history, etc.) and aim to study texts in Latin, Greek and the vernacular, as well as pictorial and performative traditions. We do not only welcome specific case studies, but also (strongly) encourage broader (meta)perspectives, e.g. of a diachronic or transdisciplinary nature. The conference will span the period from the twelfth until the seventeenth centuries.

The conference will be organized by the Leuven Centre for the Study of the Transmission of Texts and Ideas in Antiquity, the Middle Ages and the Renaissance (LECTIO). It follows upon last year’s conference on polemics, rivalry and networking in Greco-Roman Antiquity.

Confirmed keynote speakers:
Laura Beck Varela (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid)
Leen Spruit (Radboud Universiteit – Nijmegen)
Anita Traninger (Freie Universität – Berlin)

We invite submissions for paper proposals in English, French, German and Italian. Proposals should consist of a (provisional) title, an abstract of 300-400 words, and information concerning the applicant’s name, current position, academic affiliation, contact details and (if applicable) related publications on the topic. Applicants who intend to speak in French, German or Italian, are expected to include an English abstract as well. Accepted papers will be awarded a 30 minutes slot (20 minutes presentation, 10 minutes for discussion).

Please submit your proposal via email (lectio@kuleuven.be) by April 15, 2019. Applicants will be notified by email within 5 weeks from this date.

Successful applicants are expected to submit their paper for inclusion in a thematic volume to be published in the LECTIO series (Brepols Publishers). All submitted papers will be subject to a process of blind peer-review.

For any further queries, please mail to lectio@kuleuven.be.

Organizing committee: Guy Claessens, Wim Decock, Jeroen De Keyser, Fabio Della Schiava, Wouter Druwé, Wim François, Erika Gielen.

Contact: lectio@kuleuven.be

Call: https://www.kuleuven.be/lectio/conferences

(CFP ended April 15, 2019)

 

 

CARDINAL ALESSANDRO ALBANI: COLLECTING, DEALING, AND DIPLOMACY IN GRAND TOUR EUROPE / COLLEZIONISMO, DIPLOMAZIA ED IL MERCATO NELL’EUROPA DEL GRAND TOUR

British School at Rome / Centro di Studi sulla Cultura e l’Immagine di Roma: December 11–13, 2019

Organised by Clare Hornsby and Mario Bevilacqua

This conference aims to bring together an international range of art historians alongside scholars of related humanistic disciplines to open a new chapter on the multifaceted life and career of Cardinal Alessandro Albani (1692–1779), ‘The Father of the Grand Tour’. Albani operated in many different spheres of Roman society in a variety of roles: antiquarian, collector, art dealer, political agent, spy. It is time to make a reassessment of his life and of his activities.

There is a close connection between Britain and the study of Cardinal Albani, reflecting the central role that the British played in the art market in Rome, as entrepreneurs and purchasers. This subject—which casts valuable light on the political and diplomatic networks in mid-eighteenth-century Europe—needs to be revisited, particularly in the light of the many books, conferences, and exhibitions on collecting and the art market that have appeared in the last 25 years. It is appropriate that this conference should have as one of its venues the British School at Rome [BSR], which has, over this period, hosted many scholarly events connected with the Grand Tour.

For many years European scholars have examined aspects of the life of Cardinal Alessandro Albani, particularly in respect of his magnificent collections of ancient sculpture—of central importance in artistic and museological culture in Rome—as well as in the family archives and European correspondence. His relationship with major figures in eighteenth-century European art such as Winckelmann and Piranesi remains a fruitful area of study.

The second venue of the conference—the Centro di Studi sulla Cultura e l’Immagine di Roma [CSCIR—is an institution renowned for its commitment to a deeper understanding and reflection on Roman historical and artistic life. By this British and Italian collaboration we hope not only to build new networks of scholarship but to focus international attention on the Albani collections at a key moment.

The role of Alessandro Albani is key in eighteenth-century Rome, both as a patron of the arts and in the wider political life of the European courts. This conference is designed to be multi-disciplinary and international, reflecting the life and career of Albani himself. Proposals for talks might address the following themes:

Albani in the Grand Tour
The Roman art market
Albani and Vatican diplomacy
His correspondents and social networks
The Stuart court in Rome
Philipp von Stosch, Horace Mann, and spying
Albani the archaeologist
The drawings collection of Cassiano dal Pozzo and their sale to King George III
Winckelmann and Albani
Albani as taste-maker
The collections — sculpture, drawings, and the libraries
Albani and Piranesi
The Albani archives
Villa Albani

The languages of the conference are English and Italian, and the event will be open to the public. We invite doctoral students, postdoctoral researchers, established scholars, and members of the foreign academies in Rome to submit proposals for papers which will fall into two groups:

(1) 15-minute presentations on one event, object, or discrete theme
(2) 30-minute presentations on collections or connected themes

Please send an abstract of either 500 words (for a 15-minute talk) or 1000 words (for a 30-minute talk) with a 200-word CV to albaniconvegno@gmail.com by 1 April 2019.

We plan to publish a volume of essays based on this conference.

Scientific Committee: Mario Bevilacqua (Università degli Studi di Firenze, CSCIR), Amanda Claridge (Royal Holloway University of London, Cassiano del Pozzo project), Clare Hornsby (Research Fellow, BSR), Ian Jenkins (Dept. of Greek and Roman Antiquities, British Museum), Harriet O’Neill (Assistant Director, BSR), Susanna Pasquali (La Sapienza Roma), Jonny Yarker (Libson and Yarker Ltd., London)

Call: http://www.bsr.ac.uk/call-for-papers-cardinal-alessandro-albani-collecting-dealing-and-diplomacy-in-grand-tour-europe

(CFP closed April 1, 2019)

 

 

TOKENS: THE ATHENIAN LEGACY TO THE MODERN WORLD

The British School at Athens: December 16-17, 2019

Keynote speakers: Quinn DuPont and John H. Kroll

Never before has an object of everyday life played such a powerful role in a multitude of circumstances: economics (Agorism, cryptocurrencies, tokenized credit and debit cards), governance (‘Agora’ networks applied in elections), and computing (data security via tokenization). This workshop aims to achieve a better understanding of tokens in ancient Athens as well as their modern-day applications in voting and market mechanics. Current theories and practices employ Athens and the city’s tokens as a historical paradigm. But what do we actually know about Athenian tokens? The workshop will focus on the following questions:

* What were the roles played by tokens in Athens? Did these roles evolve from the Classical to the Roman Imperial Period?
* Were tokens an ‘Athenian’ innovation? How did other Greek cities and states respond? What was the Roman ‘addition’ to Athenian tokens?
* What are the similarities between tokens then and now?
* How have tokens enabled and continue to enable anonymity and the operation of networks?
* How do tokens contribute to the formation of civic and political identity?
* How do tokens support legal and political equality?
* Can tokens stand for a master network of expertise? How do they become indispensable for the purposes of management and decision making?
* What rituals, behaviors and sentiments are related to tokens? Can tokens be regarded as a means of saving transaction costs?

The workshop invites contributions from across the humanities, informatics, finance and social sciences and welcomes discussion on any of the themes detailed above. Speakers may also bring their own themes or ideas. The workshop is designed as a forum of exchange in order to continue developing an interdisciplinary approach on the subject, already begun in two previous workshops (University of Warwick June 2017, British School at Rome October 2018), as part of the Token Communities in the Ancient Mediterranean Project.

Papers of 20 minutes duration are invited. Proposals including a title, name, e-mail address and an abstract of no more than 300 words should be emailed to Mairi Gkikaki, m.gkikaki@warwick.ac.uk by 1st May 2019. Notification of acceptance will be given by 1st June 2019. Travel subsidy will be possible. An edited volume of select papers arising from the conference is envisaged.

This workshop forms part of ‘Tokens and their Cultural biography in Athens from the Classical Age to the End of Antiquity’ project, a MARIE SKŁODOWSKA-CURIE action under the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No AMD-794080-2.

Website: https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/classics/research/dept_projects/tcam/events/athens

(CFP closed May 1, 2019)

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January 2020

#CFP [SCS PANEL] [LIGHTNING PAPERS] CLASSICS AND CIVIL ACTIVISM

Society for Classical Studies (SCS) 2020 Annual Meeting. Washington DC: January 2-5, 2020

Organizers: Yurie Hong (Gustavus Adolphus College), Marina Haworth (North Hennepin Community College), Amit Shilo (UC, Santa Barbara), T. H. M. Gellar-Goad (Wake Forest University)

Classicists at all levels have knowledge, experience, skills, and contacts that can usefully contribute to civic activism outside of academia proper. The Classics & Social Justice Affiliated Group has organized a workshop on the subject of Classics and Civic Activism for the upcoming AIA/SCS meeting. We invite proposals for a lightning round on outward-facing activism in which presenters will spend 3 minutes sharing their own experiences and making recommendations. These presentations will become integral to discussions among participants during the following breakout sessions.

The lightning round is the second of three parts of the workshop:

1) Three featured presenters from Indivisible, the National Humanities Alliance, and the American Federation of Teachers will offer guidance in community organizing, engaging with representatives, and other advocacy work, specifically focusing on how academics and educators can combine their skills and expertise with activism.

2) Lightning-round presentations will allow members to share their own experiences with civic engagement, presenting a broad spectrum of Classics-based activism.

3) Small-group discussion will allow time for participants to actively engage with the topics raised in the lightning round and share their own techniques and resources.

Potential lightning-round topics include, but are not limited to:

* using insights from the ancient world to advocate for social justice today
* engaging in political or community issue advocacy
* public-facing outreach projects
* advocating for educational policy
* organizing and unionizing at colleges and schools
* fostering inclusivity and accessibility in museums and historical sites
* letter-writing campaigns and citizen lobbying
* educating the public about ancient and modern democracy

Submit a 1-2 sentence proposal to be a lightning-round speaker by filling out this brief submission form https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSd1gaRC3BfaAmwri3UfKHYnKFI6OldlR8395x5xRTqaNUNo0Q/viewform no later than midnight September 15. The organizers are committed to ensuring diversity in topics and presenters, including presenters from all parts of the AIA/SCS membership: undergraduate and graduate students, retired members, teachers and professors, independent scholars, curators, editors, and more. We welcome submitters to comment on their own positionality in relation to their topic if they would like.

Due to limited time, not all potential speakers may be able to be accommodated during the lightning round, however there will be time during the following small-group discussion. Giving a lightning-round talk *does not* interfere with giving a paper or chairing a panel elsewhere on the program (per the SCS’ “single-appearance” policy).

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/scs-news/cfp-classics-and-civic-activism

 

 

[SCS PANEL] EOS: BLACK CLASSICISM IN THE VISUAL ARTS

Society for Classical Studies (SCS) 2020 Annual Meeting. Washington DC: January 2-5, 2020

Eos is a scholarly society dedicated to Africana Receptions of Ancient Greece and Rome. For our next workshop at the annual meeting of the Society for Classical Studies (SCS) in Washington, DC (January 2-5, 2020), we invite abstracts for papers that trace and interpret visual responses to classical materials among people of African descent and relate them to the typically more text-based study of Black Classicisms.

In conceiving of this event, we have sought to combine several convergent strands of scholarly inquiry in the study of the Greek and Roman Classics. The discipline has long noted--and in the recent past increasingly sought to disrupt--the strict separation between the study of literary texts and of material objects, including works of visual art. At the same time, greater attention has been paid to previously marginalized voices, both ancient and modern. Finally and concurrently, Classical Reception Studies has moved closer to the center of the discipline’s attention, as growing numbers of classicists have recognized that one cannot help but look at the past from a perspective that is shaped by the needs of one’s present.

In the words of Romare Bearden, African American artist and creator (among many other works) of a series of collages and water colors entitled “Odysseus Suite”: “An artist is an art lover who finds that in all the art that he sees, something is missing: to put there what he feels is missing becomes the centre of his work.” To foreground these “missing” centers through discussions of visual engagements with classical materials is our workshop’s objective. We hope to deepen our understanding of the intellectual, emotional, and creative responses elicited by the ancient world in people of diverse backgrounds, and contributors therefore need not—and indeed: should not—restrict themselves to the classical “half” of these inter-medial dialogues. Rather, there should be an equal emphasis on the messages the relevant artists seek to send to their contemporaries, and/or on how Greco-Roman materials are combined with other artistic traditions of (e.g.) Africa, the Mediterranean, the Caribbean, etc. in the pursuit of artistic and creative expression. One exemplary study of such processes is Robert G. O’Meally’s 2007 examination of Bearden’s “Black Odyssey,” which reveals among other influences the impact that Jazz improvisation has had on Bearden’s art and how the very method of presentation (i.e., collages availing themselves of rich color palettes) informs the creation of meaning in his work.

Nor need the piece(s) of visual art that stand at the center of each paper necessarily provide the sole focus of discussion. An alternate direction is hinted at in Kwame Dawes’s and Matthew Shenoda’s 2017 collection of poetic responses to Bearden’s Odyssey. On this model, a paper could put classical materials in multi-directional conversation both with visual and with literary reactions. In fact, the presenters should not try too stringently to exclude themselves from the creation of meaning in the multimedial interchanges they uncover. Rather, they should feel free to pursue what Lorna Hardwick and Emily Greenwood have called “frail” or “fuzzy connections.” Any interpretation of a point of contact between different works of art ultimately emerges from the viewer’s or reader’s own mind, not always necessarily from the artist’s. Yet it can still provide insights into the mechanics underlying the ancient and modern materials in question. Another way to make sense of this dynamic is to understand the artist’s role in the process as an act of Signifyin(g). According to Henry Louis Gates’s 1986 exploration of this trope, allusivity in Africa and the African Diaspora tends to combine repetition with revision, even as it remains deliberately open to varied interpretations.

Topics to consider include the work of Romare Bearden himself, but there are many additional artists whose sculptures, paintings, drawings, architecture, etc. invite the attention of Classical Reception scholars. Examples include, but are in no way limited to, Lorraine O’Grady, Simone Leigh, or Jack Whitten.

Eos is committed to creating a congenial and collaborative forum for the infusion of new ideas into Classics, and hence welcomes abstracts that are exploratory in nature as well as abstracts of latter-stage research. Above all, we aim to create a supportive environment for scholars of all stages working on Africana Receptions of Greco-Roman antiquity.

Abstracts of no more than 400 words should be sent as an email attachment to cfp@eosafricana.org by Friday, March 1, 2019. The abstracts will be judged anonymously: please do not identify yourself in any way on the abstract page. All presenters must be members of the SCS.

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/2020/151/eos-black-classicism-visual-arts

(CFP closed March 1, 2019)

 

 

[SCS PANEL] HOMER IN THE RENAISSANCE

Society for Classical Studies (SCS) 2020 Annual Meeting. Washington DC: January 2-5, 2020

The Society for Early Modern Classical Reception (SEMCR) welcomes proposals for papers to be delivered at the 2020 meeting of the Society for Classical Studies in Washington, DC. For its fifth annual panel, SEMCR invites abstracts on the reception of Homer in all its manifestations in the early modern world.

The last fifteen years have seen an explosion in studies of the scholarly and creative reception of Homer in the Renaissance. Work by scholars including Marc Bizer, Tania Demetriou, Philip Ford, Filippomaria Pontani, and Jessica Wolfe--to name but a few--has illuminated the manuscript and print transmission of the Homeric texts and revealed the enormous range of contexts in which Homer was put to use and the immense variety of artistic, cultural, political, philosophical, and theological issues the Homeric poems were used to explore. Today it is possible to investigate questions in Homeric reception that would have been difficult to ask, let alone answer, fifteen years ago.

Proposals may address (but are not limited to) the transmission, translation, or book history of the Homeric texts; the commentary tradition; artistic, literary, or musical responses to Homer; political, philosophical, or scientific uses of Homer. We welcome the consideration of topics including the perspectives Homeric reception provides on Renaissance philology, knowledge of Greek or of oral composition, or the reconfiguration of literary or cultural histories; the discovery of Homer as a source of innovation or inspiration in a wide range of genres and media, or as an alternative to the authority of Latin poets or Roman culture; the geographical, political, or religious factors that influenced Homeric reception in different areas or communities, and the myriad uses to which the Homeric poems were put to explore those factors; the ways in which digital technologies might influence our understanding of Homer’s Renaissance reception.

We are committed to creating a congenial and collaborative forum for the infusion of new ideas into classics, and hence welcome abstracts that are exploratory in nature as well as abstracts of latter-stage research. Above all, we aim to show how the field of early modern classical reception can bear on a wide range of literary and cultural study, and to dispel the notion of an intimidating barrier to entry.

Abstracts of no more than 400 words, suitable for a 15-20 minute presentation, should be sent as an email attachment to ariane.schwartz@gmail.com. All persons who submit abstracts must be SCS members in good standing. The abstracts will be judged anonymously: please do not identify yourself in any way on the abstract page.

Proposals must be received by Friday, March 8, 2019.

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/2020/151/semcr-homer-renaissance

(CFP closed March 8, 2019)

 

 

[SCS PANEL] IMPERIAL VIRGIL

Society for Classical Studies (SCS) 2020 Annual Meeting. Washington DC: January 2-5, 2020

Whether one emphasizes his ambivalence or his applause, Virgil was unquestionably the poet of the nascent Roman empire. Like Homer, the Zeus of poets, Virgil was also the magisterial predecessor for all subsequent authors of pastoral, didactic, or epic. He was thus “imperial” in a double sense, as a commentator on the Roman world being transformed by Augustus and as a kind of poetic doppelgänger for the princeps himself.

This panel seeks to explore both aspects of Virgil and his legacy. Topics might include, without being limited to, Virgil’s response to the rise of Augustus and his role in shaping Roman response more broadly; how Virgil’s contemporaries or later authors used his imperial themes to mirror or to create a contrast with their own works and/or times; and the figure of Virgil himself in later literature, including late antique and early modern works.

Abstracts for papers should be submitted electronically as Word documents by March 1, 2019 to Julia Hejduk (Julia_Hejduk@baylor.edu), preferably with the subject heading “abstract_imperial_SCS2020”. The abstracts will be judged anonymously and so should not reveal the author’s name, but the email should provide name, abstract title, and affiliation. Abstracts should be 650 words or fewer and should follow the guidelines for individual abstracts (https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/guidelines-authors-abstracts), except that works cited should be put at the end of the document, not in a separate text box.

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/2020/151/imperial-virgil

(CFP closed March 1, 2019)

 

 

[SCS PANEL] NEO-LATIN IN THE OLD AND NEW WORLDS: CURRENT SCHOLARSHIP

Society for Classical Studies (SCS) 2020 Annual Meeting. Washington DC: January 2-5, 2020

Organized by Frederick J. Booth, Seton Hall University

The AANLS invites proposals for a panel of papers on current research on Neo-Latin texts from around the world to be held at the annual meeting of the Society for Classical Studies (SCS) in Washington, DC in early January 2020. We seek to highlight the variety and depth of Neo-Latin Studies; to underscore the importance of contemporary scholarship in the complex, global field of Neo-Latin literature; and to give scholars an opportunity to share the results of their research with colleagues in the many disciplines that comprise Neo-Latin studies. We welcome papers on all aspects of the study of literary, historical, scholarly, legal, scientific, and technical works written in Latin in the Renaissance and early Modern Period (to about 1800), as well as papers dealing with more recent Neo-Latin works.

Abstracts should be sent (and arrive no later than midnight EST on Saturday, February 23, 2019) to Dr. Frederick J. Booth at boothfre@shu.edu. Abstracts should be a maximum of 650 words (not including a brief bibliography). In accordance with SCS regulations, all abstracts for papers will be read anonymously by three referees. Please follow the instructions for the format of individual abstracts that appear on the SCS web site. In your cover letter or e-mail, please confirm that you are an SCS or AIA member in good standing (and please note your membership number), with dues paid through 2020.

https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/2020/151/aanls-2020

(CFP closed February 23, 2019)

 

 

[SCS PANEL] PROBLEMS IN PERFORMANCE: FAILURE AND CLASSICAL RECEPTION STUDIES

Society for Classical Studies (SCS) 2020 Annual Meeting. Washington DC: January 2-5, 2020

Organizer-Refereed Panel. Organized by Rosa Andújar and Daniel Orrells, King’s College London

Scholars who work on the modern performance and reception history of classical drama have often focused on the manner in which Greek and Roman plays successfully provide modern writers with a ready-made vocabulary for expressing painful and complex realities. This emphasis on the “success” of classical drama in the modern world could arguably be seen as a continuation of a long history of Euro- American philhellenism and idealization of the ancient world.

This panel aims to move away from what may be seen as a partial and skewed history of the performance and reception of Greek and Roman theatre in modernity, which focuses on positive case studies that celebrate the successful adaptation and application of ancient drama in diverse contexts. This panel instead proposes to explore a fuller and more nuanced history, focusing in particular on “failed” moments of classical theatre.

Possible areas of scrutiny include, but are not limited to:

* Invocations of Greek and Roman plays that were received with indifference or with lukewarm interest
* Modern performances of classical plays that “sort of” worked, or received negative receptions
* Moments of bewilderment and puzzlement in modern audiences, stemming from classical references, themes and motifs

In emphasizing scenes of “failed” reception and problems in performance in modernity, we seek to explore a larger question: how does an understanding of such an alternative performance history provide us with a fuller and different history of classical reception in modern theatre and more broadly, in the modern world? Through such an inquiry, this panel aims to unsettle the polarized state of Classical Reception Studies, in which classical texts are viewed on a binary system, as either agents of liberation or oppression. Rather than looking for more examples of how ancient theater has “successfully” administered the power to say the unsayable, we are especially eager for contributions that can help us think about performances which generated problems around conflicted subjectivity – about the awkward and difficult closeness between perpetrators and victims of political and sexual violence; about the complicities between the colonizer and the colonized.

Please send an anonymous abstract for a 20-minute paper as an email attachment to info@classicalstudies.org by February 8, 2019, listing the title of this panel as the subject line of the email. The text of the abstract should not mention the name of the author. Submissions should follow the SCS guidelines for individual abstracts and will be reviewed by the organizers, who will make final selections by the end of March.

Please address questions about the panel to the organizers: rosa.andujar@kcl.ac.uk and daniel.orrells@kcl.ac.uk

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/2020/151/problems-performance-failure-and-classical-reception-studies

(CFP closed February 8, 2019)

 

 

[SCS PANEL] SISTERS DOIN’ FOR THEMSELVES: WOMEN IN POWER IN THE ANCIENT WORLD AND THE ANCIENT IMAGINARY

Society for Classical Studies (SCS) 2020 Annual Meeting. Washington DC: January 2-5, 2020

A panel sponsored by the Women’s Classical Caucus for the 2020 annual meeting of the Society for Classical Studies in Washington, D.C.

Organized by Serena S. Witzke (Wesleyan University) and T. H. M. Gellar-Goad (Wake Forest University)

Among the most prominent anxieties expressed in sources from the ancient world are the fears of the wrath of the gods, of the destruction brought on by war, and of women in charge. Oppressed and controlled by the patriarchies of antiquity, women were not often allowed constitutional or legal roles in official affairs, but nevertheless found ways to exercise autonomy and accrue authority in the home, the community, and the state — and in some places and times, women wielded legitimate and public power.

This proposed panel will gather papers exploring both historical expressions of women’s authority and influence (both formal and informal) and the imagined incarnations of women’s power, as well as the intersections of gender, status, ethnos, ability, and power. Panelists might approach the issue through literature both historical and fictive, through art or architecture, through epigraphic evidence or papyri, and through archaeology or material culture. Potential topics include, but are not limited to, empresses and foreign queens; priestesses or philosophers; business proprietors and political campaigners; Hellenistic patronesses and local benefactors; the historiographical and literary figure of the dux femina; elegiac beloveds, hetairai, and meretrices; matronae and other powerful women heads of household; and the ways in which women in subsequent generations have used references to ancient women in power to support their own access to power.

Papers may address questions such as the following: what constitutes legitimate power? In what ways did women exercise influence and authority? What backlash did women face from these expressions of power? How did such women shape their societies and their worlds? What methods can we use to detect and understand women’s wielding of power in situations and contexts dominated by patriarchal oppression and silencing of women’s voices, actions, and experiences? How do status, ethnos, and ability interplay with gender in expressing power and in condemnations of those expressions?

Please send abstracts that follow the guidelines for individual abstracts (see the SCS website) by email to Ms. Julie Pechanek at pechanjn@wfu.edu by March 1, 2019. Ensure that the abstracts are anonymous. The organizers will review all submissions anonymously and inform submitters of their decision by the end of March 2019, with enough time that those not chosen can participate in the SCS’ individual abstract submission process.

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/2020/151/sisters-doin-themselves

(CFP closed March 1, 2019)

 

 

[SCS PANEL] THEATER OF DISPLACEMENT: ANCIENT TRAGEDY AND MODERN REFUGEES, IMMIGRANTS AND MIGRANTS

CAMP Panel, Society for Classical Studies (SCS) 2020 Annual Meeting. Washington DC: January 2-5, 2020

Organizers: Seth A. Jeppesen, BYU; Chiara Aliberti, BYU; Cecilia Peek, BYU

In Euripides’ Trojan Women, Hecuba and her fellow captives use a wide array of verbs for speaking and singing as they struggle to make their voices and stories heard in the face of repeated attempts by the men in the play to silence them and relegate them to the status of possessions rather than persons. Similar attempts to silence or disregard the plight of modern refugees and migrants are apparent all around us, from the newly energized nationalist movements in Europe to the tear gas canisters lobbed at women and children along the U.S.-Mexico border. As Nadia Murad has shown (The Last Girl, 2017), one of the most powerful ways of combatting this oppression is to open a dialogue and listen to the voices of those displaced by war as they tell us their stories. Bryan Doerries (The Theater of War, 2016) has shown how Greek tragedy can be used to initiate conversations regarding combat trauma, mass incarceration and end-of-life care and encourage recognition and healing for those involved. Luis Alfaro, in turn, has demonstrated in his recent play Mojada how well adaptations of Greek tragedy can address issues facing modern migrants and immigrants. Many Greek tragedies deal with displacement caused by war and characters who seek asylum from other cities and governments (e.g. Aeschylus’ Suppliants, Euripides’ Trojan Women, Hecuba, Andromache, Helen, Suppliant Women, etc.) There is much potential for scholarship and performance that uses Greek tragedy not only to elucidate the current refugee crisis but also to raise awareness and provide healing and understanding to communities. This panel invites papers that explore themes of cultural and physical displacement in Greek Tragedy and potentially draw connections between ancient literature and the current worldwide refugee/migrant crisis. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

* The language of displacement and/or silencing in Greek tragedy
* Greek tragedy and historical displacement in 5th century Greece
* The effects of war and violence in Greek tragedy
* Modern reception of Greek tragedy in the context of refugees, migrants, and immigrants
* Greek tragedy and public humanities projects that deal with issues facing refugees, migrants, and immigrants

Abstracts should follow the SCS guidelines for individual abstracts and can be sent by email to ksburns@uic.edu. Review of abstracts begins March 1, 2019. Abstracts received by March 15 will receive full consideration. Please ensure that the abstracts are anonymous. In accordance with SCS regulations, all abstracts for papers will be read anonymously by the panel organizers, who will serve as referees. Those selected for the panel will be informed by March 30.

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/2020/151/cfp-ancient-tragedy-and-modern-refugees-immigrants-and-migrants

(CFP closed March 15, 2019)

 

 

[SCS PANEL] WHAT'S NEW IN OVIDIAN STUDIES?

Society for Classical Studies (SCS) 2020 Annual Meeting. Washington DC: January 2-5, 2020

The International Ovidian Society, a newly formed organization and a new Affiliated Group of the SCS, seeks papers for its panel at the 2020 conference in Washington, D.C. Among the Society’s greatest purposes are to encourage future scholarship on Ovid, to support younger scholars and new work in Ovid, and to reach out beyond Classics to scholars in other fields, as well as to performers and artists, who do significant work related to Ovid and Ovidian reception.

The theme for our 2020 panel is “What’s New in Ovidian Studies?” With this panel, we hope to showcase new approaches to, and new topics in, the study of Ovidian poetry. We encourage all kinds of abstracts and we aim to provide a wide-ranging panel that looks to the future, providing both innovative topics and a broad spread overall of new directions for Ovidian studies.

Send questions to the co-organizers, Sharon James (sljames@unc.edu) and Alison Keith (akeith@chass.utoronto.ca).

Please send an abstract for a 20-minute paper as an email attachment to lfulkerson@fsu.edu by February 8, 2019, listing the title of this panel as the subject line of the email. The text of the abstract should not mention the name of the author, but the email message should provide name, abstract title, and affiliation. Abstracts must be 650 words or fewer and follow the SCS guidelines for individual abstracts (https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/guidelines-authors-abstracts), but should include works cited at the end of the document, not in a separate text box. Submissions will be reviewed by third-party referees, who will make final selections by the end of March.

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/2020/151/cfp-whats-new-ovidian-studies

(CFP closed February 8, 2019)

 

 

CALGACUS IN 2020

UCL/KCL Symposium at Kings College London: January 25, 2020

To mark the septcentenary of the Declaration of Arbroath, recognising Scotland’s independence from England, Tom Mackenzie (UCL) and Edith Hall (KCL) will be convening a one-day symposium on Calgacus and his reception at UCL on Burns Night 2020 (25th January).

Offers of papers are requested (deadline July 19th 2019) to be sent to edith.hall@kcl.ac.uk.

Possible topics include the way Calgacus is presented in commentaries across the centuries on Tacitus’ Agricola, translations of his speech, the way it has informed anti-imperial or nationalist rhetoric subsequently, antiquarian and archaeological studies of the Battle of Mons Graupius, the presentation of Calgacus in the visual arts, fiction, drama, film and documentaries, his role in the Ossianic movement and Celtic revival and the journal Calgacus published by radical Gaelic-speaking poets in the 1970s.

Haggis (including vegetarian), neeps, single malt whisky and a reading of SCOTS WHA HAE promised. Bidh ùine mhath aig a h-uile duine!

Call: https://www.facebook.com/groups/430896740266607/permalink/2421657764523818/

(CFP closed July 19, 2019)

 

 

AUSTRALASIAN SOCIETY FOR CLASSICAL STUDIES (ASCS) 41ST ANNUAL CONFERENCE

University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand: January 28-31, 2020

CFP: http://www.ascs.org.au/news/ascs41_call_for_papers.html - Deadline: July 31, 2019.

Conference website: TBA.

Program: TBA.

Enquiries: Daniel Osland: ASCS2020@otago.ac.nz

ASCS: http://www.ascs.org.au/

(CFP closed July 31, 2019)

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February 2020

[PANEL] IS THIS SPARTA? RECEPTION OF THE ANCIENT WORLD IN CONTEMPORARY MEDIA

108th College Art Association of America (CAA) Annual Conference, Chicago, USA: February 12-15, 2020

In early 2017, Berkeley, CA was witness to a series of demonstrations by right-wing protestors over the cancellation of a talk by Milo Yiannopoulous, some of whom incorporated Spartan-style armor into their outfits. Likewise, the Plutarch quotation "μολὼν λαβέ" has been adopted by the American Gun Rights community as a rallying call for Second Amendment defense. Scholars have increasingly recognized the power of contemporary reception to colour modern views of the ancient world. In this case, Zack Snyder's 2006 film 300 has become a cultural monolith that promotes a hyper-militaristic version of Sparta that is inconsistent with current scholarship. Gillen Kelly's and Bellaire Cowles' graphic novel Three is a notable step towards accuracy, along with Ubisoft's 2018 video game Assassin's Creed: Odyssey, yet both are indebted to the long train of reception that brought Snyder's film into being. With such dissonance between public and academic "fact," what, then, is Sparta?

This panel seeks to address how the reception of antiquity in modern media (broadly defined as visual arts and media post-1800) either counteracts or informs public opinion and knowledge. To that end we solicit proposals on how reception can spawn self-reinforcing narrative traditions, be leveraged in teaching, inspire public interest or, at worst, advance harmful and exclusionary modern agendas. We hope to spur discussion on how to incorporate this phenomenon in teaching, publication, and scholarship, and what our responsibility is as scholars to the larger public conversation. Proposals that feature inter- and multidisciplinary approaches are especially encouraged.

Chairs: Kira Jones - kkjone3@emory.edu and sburges@bu.eduSteven Matthew Burges, Boston University -

Call: https://caa.confex.com/caa/2020/webprogrampreliminary/Session5927.html

(CFP closed July 23, 2019)

 

 

#CFP LIVING LATIN AND GREEK IN NYC 2020: "NEGLECTED VOICES"

New York City, NY, USA: February 15-16, 2020

The Paideia Institute is pleased to welcome abstract submissions to the eighth iteration of Living Latin and Greek in New York City. This conference, which features papers delivered in Latin and Ancient Greek as well as small breakout sessions where participants practice speaking Ancient Greek and Latin under the guidance of expert instructors, will be held at Fordham University on February 15th and 16th, 2020.

The theme of this year’s conference is “Neglected Voices.” Which people or groups of people have been neglected, disregarded, or socially excluded throughout the history of Greco-Latinity? What do we know about them, and how do we know what we know? How does exploring their contributions help paint a fuller picture of the Ancient Greek- and Latin-speaking past?

We invite proposals for short talks in Ancient Greek or Latin on this theme with examples from Ancient Greek and Latin literature or material culture. In particular, we welcome proposals that amplify the voices of women, religious or ethnic minorities, slaves, non-elites, those who do not conform with regard to gender or sexuality, and other historically excluded groups. Outstanding submissions on other topics will also be considered, particularly (but not only) if they focus on classical language pedagogy.

Please use the link to send in an abstract of no more than 500 words: https://www.paideiainstitute.org/llinyc_abstract_submission. The deadline for submissions is September 15, 2019. Travel bursaries are available and can be requested through the same link. We encourage accepted speakers to apply for external funding as well since the number of travel bursaries is limited. All talks will be recorded, subtitled, and (with each speaker’s permission) published on Paideia's YouTube channel.

Call: https://www.paideiainstitute.org/llinyc_2020_call_for_papers

 

 

#CFP [PANELS] CLASSICAL REPRESENTATIONS IN POPULAR CULTURE

Southwest Popular / American Culture Association (SWPACA) 41st Annual Conference, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA: February 19-22, 2020

Proposals for papers and panels are now being accepted for the 41st annual SWPACA conference. One of the nation's largest interdisciplinary academic conferences, SWPACA offers nearly 70 subject areas, each typically featuring multiple panels. For a full list of subject areas, area descriptions, and Area Chairs, please visit http://southwestpca.org/conference/call-for-papers/.

Classical Representations in Popular Culture

Papers on any aspect of Greek, Roman, or Mediterranean antiquity in contemporary or popular culture are eligible for consideration.

Classical Representations welcomes submissions on a broader range of topics including:

* Cinema directly or indirectly reflecting aspects of the ancient world in cinema: recent films involving Classical themes which you might consider include Game of Thrones, Stranger Things, The Legend of Hercules, Pompeii, Inside Llewyn Davis, the new Ben Hur, as well as television series which engage with classical themes like Doctor Who, Spartacus, Battlestar Galactica.
* Classical Motifs/Allusions/Parallels in Popular Music
* Dance, Ballet, Theater, the Visual Arts
* Children's Literature
* Graphic Novels and Cartoons
* Literary Theory/Postcolonial Theory/Reception Studies: Literary or theoretical analysis of literature employing classical references or motifs, like Anne Carson's Autobiography of Red, or Margaret Atwood's Penelopiad.
* Science Fiction/Fantasy: Analysis of representations of classical history, literature, or philosophy in science fiction movies or books, as Edward Gibbons to Asimov's Foundation Trilogy or the impact of Thucydides in Cold War cinema. Or, conversely, the influence of Science Fiction on representations of the ancient world in later cinema (e.g., how did George Lucas' empire of the Star Wars franchise influence later representations of the Roman Empire?)
* Pedagogy: applications of classics in popular culture: how can we use contemporary films or literature in the classroom?

This year, one panel of Classical Representations will be co-hosted by AIMS (Antiquity in Media Studies, "a new organization dedicated to promoting and supporting scholarship on the ancient world in modern media.") To submit to this panel, please type "Submission to AIMS Panel" at the top of your abstract. If not included in the AIMS panel, your paper will still be considered for inclusion in the regular panels.

All proposals must be submitted through the conference's database at http://register.southwestpca.org/southwestpca

For details on using the submission database and on the application process in general, please see the Proposal Submission FAQs and Tips page at http://southwestpca.org/conference/faqs-and-tips/

Individual proposals for 15-minute papers must include an abstract of approximately 200-500 words. Including a brief bio in the body of the proposal form is encouraged, but not required.

For information on how to submit a proposal for a roundtable or a multi-paper panel, please view the above FAQs and Tips page.

The deadline for submissions is October 31, 2019. As in past years, this may be extended at a later date.

SWPACA offers monetary awards for the best graduate student papers in a variety of categories. Submissions of accepted, full papers are due January 1, 2020. For more information, visit http://southwestpca.org/conference/graduate-student-awards/

Registration and travel information for the conference is available at http://southwestpca.org/conference/conference-registration-information/

In addition, please check out the organization's peer-reviewed, scholarly journal, Dialogue: The Interdisciplinary Journal of Popular Culture and Pedagogy, at http://journaldialogue.org/

If you have any questions about the Classical Representations in Popular Culture area, please contact its Area Chair, Benjamin S. Haller, Virginia Wesleyan University, bhaller@vwu.edu. Presenters from past years, please note that Virginia Wesleyan has recently changed from a College to our University: Ben Haller's Virginia Wesleyan old email posted on past CFPs will no longer work.

Southwest Popular / American Culture Association (SWPACA): http://www.southwestpca.org

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/scs-news/cfp-classical-representations-popular-culture-0

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March 2020

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April 2020

#CFP [PANEL] CYCLICAL CLASSICAL: REBIRTHS, RENAISSANCES, AND REINVENTIONS OF ANTIQUITY

Association for Art History’s 46th Annual Conference

Newcastle University & Northumbria University, UK: 1-3 April, 2020

Session Convenors: Nicole Cochrane (University of Hull) N.C.Cochrane@2014.hull.ac.uk; Melissa Gustin (University of York) mlg519@york.ac.uk

If, as Aby Warburg said, ‘Every age has the renaissance of antiquity that it deserves’, what is the renaissance of antiquity that we deserve today? And how does that differ – if it does – from earlier renaissances and antiquities? Whether it be a 3D print of Aphrodite, Antinous as symbol of gay pride or the Photoshop of Donald Trump as Perseus triumphantly holding aloft a Gorgon-portrait of Hilary Clinton, in contemporary art, t-shirts, and the internet, the material remains of the classical world continue to permeate modern visual culture.

Following on from international exhibitions, internet discourse around the use of the antique, and recent texts by scholars such as Elizabeth Prettejohn and Caroline Vout among many others, we propose a session that engages seriously with the material remains of antiquity in art to explore the ways in which the art of the ancient world has been adapted, interpreted, and repurposed throughout history. By proposing an open time frame we hope to encourage a discussion on the dialogues formed between classical art and its receptions, questioning how issues such as gender, race, status and class, as well as political, environmental and historical factors, have impacted the use and reuse of the past. This panel will explore the constant rediscovery, reinvention, and reworking of antique material, methods, and models in different media, and invites papers from any period or medium that address questions of the ‘classical’, historic or present.

Submit a paper

Please email your paper proposals direct to the session convenors above, using the Paper Proposal Form.

You need to provide a title and abstract (250 words maximum) for a 25-minute paper (unless otherwise specified), your name and institutional affiliation (if any).

Please make sure the title is concise and reflects the contents of the paper because the title is what appears online, in social media and in the printed programme.

You should receive an acknowledgement receipt of your submission within two weeks from the session convenors.

Deadline for submissions: Monday 21 October 2019

Call: https://forarthistory.org.uk/our-work/conference/2020-annual-conference/cyclical-classical/

 

 

[RSA PANEL] ANTIQUARIAN NETWORKS IN 16TH CENTURY ROME AND THE BEGINNINGS OF ARCHAEOLOGY

Renaissance Society of America, Philadelphia, PA: April 2-4, 2020

Scholarly research in the humanities has long used a diversity of sources for the better understanding of its subjects. Information gathered from and about objects, persons, documents and ideas from professional networks were used to compare drawings and buildings, sculptures and inscriptions, texts and coins closely related to each other. In recent decades, this well-established methodology became regarded as an expression of Latour's "Actor Network Theory". Today, research exclusively based on "ANT" is however no longer limited to social or professional networks. This former narrow scope should and could be extended (again) and redefined to include Renaissance antiquarianism as a "network of networks", gathering information from all kinds of material and textual sources and combining them to reconstruct an initial or improved picture of ancient Roman past and culture. This three-panel session aims to bring together scholars from a wide range of fields, for example numismatics, epigraphy, art, archaeology, architecture, political, historical, religious and cultural studies (and their histories) as well as socially orientated historical network analysis. It is one of our aims to demonstrate how antiquarians combined information and created new interpretations of texts and artifacts to generate new knowledge. By exploring how they communicated their findings and developed new analytical methodologies, the session could help to investigate if and how to predate the beginnings of scholarly archaeology and scientific methodology from the 18th (cf. e.g. Alain Schnapp) to the 16th century. After all, antiquarian methodological approaches were very modern indeed and possibly even predated such a development in the natural sciences (cf. Rens Bod). In addition, antiquarian research networks were not only interested in the creation of scholarly knowledge out of mere curiosity. The purpose was to learn from antiquity as a source for practical solutions for contemporaneous and future problems — as was successfully achieved by Tolomei's «Accademia de lo Studio de l'Architettura» headed by Marcello Cervini.

The 3-part session will be organized by Drs. Andrea Gáldy (Munich/London; Seminar «Collecting and Display»), Damiano Acciarino (Toronto/Venice), and Bernd Kulawik (Zurich/Berlin; www.accademia-vitruviana.net).

Please send proposals of less than 300 words for a 20 min papers and a short cv until July 16, 2019, to Bernd Kulawik (be_kul@me.com).

Call: https://www.rsa.org/blogpost/1780396/326042/Antiquarian-Networks-in-16th-century-Rome-and-the-Beginnings-of-Archaeology

(CFP closed July 16, 2019)

 

 

[RSA PANEL] [SEMCR PANEL] CLASSICAL ORIGINS OF RENAISSANCE AESTHETICS

Renaissance Society of America, Philadelphia, PA: April 2-4, 2020

As an Associate Organization of the Renaissance Society of America, the Society for Early Modern Classical Reception (SEMCR) welcomes proposals for papers to be delivered at the 2020 meeting of the Renaissance Society of America in Philadelphia, PA. For one of its panels, SEMCR invites abstracts on the reception of classical theories of poetics and aesthetic experience in Renaissance art and music.

Plato's and Aristotle's theories of mimesis, Horace's Ars Poetica, and "Longinus"'s sublime have long dominated discussions of early modern aesthetics. Scholars have also sought to trace the influence of other, less explicitly didactic texts in defining the origin and value of art and the aesthetic experience in the Renaissance. Paul Barolsky, for example, has argued that Ovid's Metamorphoses lies at the heart of Renaissance aesthetics, whether in the story of Pygmalion bringing art to life or, conversely, Medusa's petrifaction of the living as competing metaphors for sculpture. Barolsky likewise sees Ovidian transformation behind Michelangelo's "non finito" and in the depiction of Botticelli's Chloris becoming Flora in the Primavera. Wendy Heller has explored the ways in which Monteverdi and Busenello's groundbreaking opera L'incoronazione di Poppea draws upon and challenges Tacitus' methods of historiography. More recently, Sarah Blake McHam has argued for the pervasive influence of Pliny's Natural History and its emphasis on life-like "naturalism" from Petrarch to Caravaggio and Poussin.

Building on these and other studies that move beyond questions of classical influence on the subject matter of Renaissance texts, this panel seeks papers that explore the strategies through which visual artists and musicians draw on classical aesthetics and the extent to which these hidden roots underlie Renaissance theory and practice.

The Society is committed to creating a congenial and collaborative forum for the infusion of new ideas into classics and early modern studies, and hence welcomes abstracts that are exploratory in nature as well as abstracts of latter-stage research.

Abstracts of no more than 150 words and a short CV of no more than 300 words should be sent as separate email attachments to caroline.stark@howard.edu (see the RSA's abstract guidelines and CV guidelines and models). The abstracts will be judged anonymously: please do not identify yourself in any way on the abstract page. Proposals must be received by August 1, 2019 extended deadline August 10, 2019.

Please include in the body of the email:
• your name, affiliation, email address
• your paper title (15-word maximum)
• relevant keywords

Call: https://www.rsa.org/blogpost/1780396/327928/Classical-Origins-of-Renaissance-Aesthetics

(CFP closed August 10, 2019)

 

 

[RSA PANEL] EXHAUSTED WITH ANTIQUITY: A SYMPTOM OF EARLY MODERN INVENTION

Renaissance Society of America, Philadelphia, PA: April 2-4, 2020

Where and when did early modern artists, architects, and writers begin to show signs of fatigue with the models of the classical past, and what kinds of creative experiments developed in response? Renaissance scholarship has long since moved beyond an understanding of its period as one defined first and foremost by a revival of antiquity. Although the significance of antiquarianism and classicism to manifold developments in early modern art and culture remains incontrovertible, both of those projects also met with productive resistance.

We invite papers addressing works of art or literature that reveal an exhaustion with antiquity and a conscious attempt to develop alternative modes, forms, and principles of invention. Especially welcome are proposals for papers that consider competing notions of the past, the distinction between ‘antique’ and ‘modern’, the political and cultural implications of the choice to forgo classical models, and the reasons why antiquity may have come to be perceived as an exhausted source in the context of certain moments and localities.

To submit a paper proposal please provide the following by email to Marisa Bass (marisa.bass@yale.edu) and Carolyn Yerkes (yerkes@princeton.edu) by 22 July 2019: – your name and institutional affiliation – paper title (15-word maximum) – abstract (150-word maximum) – keywords – curriculum vitae (up to 5 pages) – PhD completion date (past or future).

Call: https://www.rsa.org/blogpost/1780396/326084/Exhausted-with-Antiquity-A-Symptom-of-Early-Modern-Invention

(CFP closed July 22, 2019)

 

 

[RSA PANEL] [SEMCR PANEL] HOMER IN THE RENAISSANCE

Renaissance Society of America, Philadelphia, PA: April 2-4, 2020

As an Associate Organization of the Renaissance Society of America, the Society for Early Modern Classical Reception (SEMCR) invites proposals for papers to be delivered at the 2020 meeting of the Renaissance Society of America in Philadelphia, PA. For one of its panels, SEMCR invites abstracts on the reception of Homer in all its manifestations in the early modern world.

The last fifteen years have seen an explosion in studies of the scholarly and creative reception of Homer in the Renaissance. Work by scholars including Marc Bizer, Tania Demetriou, Philip Ford, Filippomaria Pontani, and Jessica Wolfe--to name but a few--has illuminated the manuscript and print transmission of the Homeric texts and revealed the enormous range of contexts in which Homer was put to use and the immense variety of artistic, cultural, political, philosophical, and theological issues the Homeric poems were used to explore. Today it is possible to investigate questions in Homeric reception that would have been difficult to ask, let alone answer, fifteen years ago.

Proposals may address (but are not limited to) the transmission, translation, or book history of the Homeric texts; the commentary tradition; artistic, literary, or musical responses to Homer; political, philosophical, or scientific uses of Homer. We welcome the consideration of topics including the perspectives Homeric reception provides on Renaissance philology, knowledge of Greek or of oral composition, or the reconfiguration of literary or cultural histories; the discovery of Homer as a source of innovation or inspiration in a wide range of genres and media, or as an alternative to the authority of Latin poets or Roman culture; the geographical, political, or religious factors that influenced Homeric reception in different areas or communities, and the myriad uses to which the Homeric poems were put to explore those factors; the ways in which digital technologies might influence our understanding of Homer's Renaissance reception.

The Society is committed to creating a congenial and collaborative forum for the infusion of new ideas into classics and early modern studies, and hence welcome abstracts that are exploratory in nature as well as abstracts of latter-stage research. Above all, we aim to show how the field of early modern classical reception can bear on a wide range of literary and cultural study, and to dispel the notion of an intimidating barrier to entry.

Abstracts of no more than 150 words and a short CV of no more than 300 words should be sent as an email attachment to caroline.stark@howard.edu (see the RSA's abstract guidelines). The abstracts will be judged anonymously: please do not identify yourself in any way on the abstract page. Proposals must be received by August 1, 2019 extended deadline August 10, 2019.

Please include in the body of the email:
• your name, affiliation, email address
• your paper title (15-word maximum)
• relevant keywords

Call: https://www.rsa.org/blogpost/1780396/327927/Homer-in-the-Renaissance

(CFP closed August 10, 2019)

 

 

[RSA PANEL] RENAISSANCE ECHOES: THE AFTERLIFE OF A MYTH

Renaissance Society of America, Philadelphia, PA: April 2-4, 2020

Among literatures, arts, philosophy, and psychology, the mythological figure of Narcissus has become a common topic of interest; quite the opposite can be said of Echo, the nymph sentenced by divine law to repeat fragments of another’s voice. Yet, in the original Ovidian myth, Echo plays a remarkable role that frames the whole Narcissus’ episode. This panel aims at exploring Echo’s mythological echoes in Renaissance literature, art, theater, and music from different perspectives:

Translations, receptions, reinterpretations of the Ovidian myth;
Echo voices in the pastoral genre;
Echo as rhetorical and musical device;
Echo as form of intertextual reference/literary allusions;
Echo as the embodiment of the lyrical subject or of the author’s voice.

We welcome proposals for 20-minute papers on (but not limited to) the above-mentioned topics. Please send abstracts with paper title (maximum 150-words-long), a short bio, your affiliation, keywords, and general discipline area to the organizers, Giulia Cardillo (cardilgx@jmu.edu) and Simona Lorenzini (simona.lorenzini@yale.edu) by July 31st, 2019.

Call: https://www.rsa.org/blogpost/1780396/323725/CfP-Renaissance-Echoes-the-Afterlife-of-a-Myth

(CFP closed July 31, 2019)

 

 

#CFP COLLECTORS AND SCHOLARS. THE NUMISMATIC WORLD IN THE LONG 19TH CENTURY

University of Tübingen, Germany: April 16-17, 2020

In the 19th century, developments in the study and collection of coins set the cornerstone for modern numismatics: major steps included the foundation of learned societies (e.g. Royal Numismatic Society in 1836, Numismatische Gesellschaft zu Berlin in 1843, American Numismatic Society in 1858, etc.) and the publication numismatic journals from the 1830s onwards (Revue numismatique in 1836, Numismatic chronicle in 1838, Revue belge de numismatique in 1842, etc.) leading to a thriving numismatic community.

The 19th century is also the time when previously private (Royal) collections became public institutions (e.g. in Paris following the French revolution, or the Münzkabinett Winterthur in 1861), and when new museums were created (e.g. the Capitoline medagliere in 1873, Kunsthistorisches Museum Wien in 1891, etc.). Subsequently, museum curators began publishing scholarly catalogues of their collections, such as the British Museum's seminal catalogue series (e.g. Greek Coins from 1873 onwards, or Oriental Coins from 1875 onwards). Some of the works published in the 19th century were aimed at collectors, such as Théodore Mionnet's or Henry Cohen's reference works, but it is notably thanks to their publications that scholars were able to process coin finds as source for dating archaeological sites and discussing social history (e.g. Theodor Mommsen identifying Kalkriese as site for the battle of the Teutoburg Forest, as early as 1850, on the basis of numismatics).

At the same time, large and famous collections evolved, were traded, or finally bequeathed to museums leading to new research on the subject. Whilst earlier collectors were almost always generalists (coins being one collecting field among others such as antiquities, paintings, gems, etc.), collectors such as Hyman Montagu or Virgil Brand devoted themselves only to numismatics. These famous collectors were sometimes scholars themselves, writing noteworthy articles. The names of John Evans, Friedrich Imhoof-Blumer, William Henry Waddington, Archer Huntington and King Victor Emmanuel III are the most prominent examples of illustrious collectors with expertise and the desire to promote numismatic scholarship through their collections.

The 19th century is also the time when collectors started paying greater attention to the condition of a coin, and to their provenance, while the new medium of photography and improved book-illustrations allowed for the documentation and recognition of individual specimens in auction catalogues and scholarly works likewise. In the same spirit, numismatists themselves became focus of interest: medals and tokens were struck in their names, and books were written about them (e.g. Médailles et jetons des numismates in 1865).

We may also think of the institutional development of archaeology out of philology around the 1840ies to become a discipline of its own that triggered a shift in perceiving coins predominantly as material manifestations of the past. In addition, we need to take into consideration the large scale professional excavations of the century (e.g. the foundation of the Reichslimeskommission in Germany in 1892) that enabled new methods in studying coins from an academic perspective. Ultimately, this pathed the way for numismatics to become a university subject with the evolution of university coin collections. The 19th century was also a time that saw the growth of nationalism, which was accompanied by a focus on one's history as mirrored in the practice of collecting and trading coins. Questions may also include to what extend numismatics was received in the realm of contemporary art such as Eugène Delacroix's engravings, and literature - for example with the many coin references found in the work of Victor Hugo. These are some of the various new avenues and perspectives the symposium wishes to explore.

Our aim is to explore the numismatic world in the long 19th century - including both, the sphere of academia, and that of collecting and dealing - with a focus on ancient numismatics but also on medieval and modern numismatics, with an interest for the political, cultural, economic, and social changes of the era. Thus, a wide range of international experts, including numismatists, historians, archaeologists, anthropologists, and art historians are invited to present their research. Papers that explore specific case studies are particularly welcome, and talks on non-Western numismatics and on medals are hoped for.

Organizers: Stefan Krmnicek (Tübingen) & Hadrien Rambach (Brussels)

Abstracts of no longer than 500 words should be sent by email to: stefan.krmnicek@uni-tuebingen.de and coinadvisor@yahoo.co.uk.

Deadline for the submission of the abstracts is October 31, 2019.

For further information visit: https://uni-tuebingen.de/collectors-and-scholars

 

 

#CFP CLASSICAL ASSOCIATION CONFERENCE 2020

Swansea University, Wales: 17–20 April, 2020

The Department of Classics, Ancient History and Egyptology at Swansea University will host the 2020 Classical Association Conference, to coincide with the University’s centenary celebrations. The conference will take place on the newly founded Bay Campus (opened in 2015), which is situated in an outstanding location, has direct access on to the beach, and its own seafront promenade. Accommodation will be arranged in hotels between Swansea’s city centre and the Bay Campus.

Swansea University’s Singleton Campus is home to the Egypt Centre, Wales’ largest museum of Egyptian antiquities. Swansea is situated close to the Gower peninsula, the UK’s first designated Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. There are castles, stately homes and Roman barracks in close proximity. There will be optional excursions to allow participants to explore the area.

Proposals for 20-minute papers, especially from coordinated panels, are invited. The University is committed to supporting and promoting equality and diversity in all of its practices and activities. We aim to establish an inclusive environment and particularly welcome proposals from diverse backgrounds. The closing date for abstracts is 31 August 2019.

Suggested themes include:
Ancient Narrative Literature
Ancient Political Thought
Archaeology of Graeco-Roman Egypt
Civil War Literature
Classics and the Future
Commentaries
Fragments
Global Classics
Metals and metallurgy
Patronage
Pedagogy and Outreach
Plato
Political Failure
Regionalism
Roman Philosophy and Satire
Rulers and rulership
The ancient reception of Augustan Poetry
The literature of poverty and disgust
The Welsh Classical Tradition

Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be sent to CA2020@swansea.ac.uk by the closing date. All other enquiries should also be directed to this e-mail address.

Call: https://listserv.liv.ac.uk/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind1905&L=CLASSICISTS&P=16032

Classical Association website: https://classicalassociation.org/

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May 2020

#CFP FEMINISM & CLASSICS 2020: BODY/LANGUAGE

Winston-Salem, North Carolina (Wake Forest University Department of Classics and Department of Philosophy): May 21-24, 2020

FemClas 2020, the eighth quadrennial conference of its kind, takes place on May 21–24, 2020, in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, at the invitation of the Wake Forest University Department of Classics and Department of Philosophy. The conference theme is "body/language," broadly construed, and papers on all topics related to feminism, Classics, Philosophy, and related themes are welcome.

This conference focuses on the use of the body and/or language to gain, lose, contest, or express power and agency in the ancient Mediterranean world. Bodies and words, at both the physical and the conceptual levels, can exert disproportionate, oppositional, or complementary forces. Both have the power to transform their surrounding environments significantly. Yet there is a problematic dichotomy between body/physicality and language/reason, a problem long noted by philosophers, literary theorists, and social historians. FemClas 2020 seeks to contest, blur, and even eradicate these boundaries through papers, panels, and other programming that promotes interdisciplinary exploration of the ancient world.

We invite contributions that use the lens of bodies, languages, or their intersections to address any aspect of the ancient world, modern encounters with ancient cultures, or the academic practices of Classics, Philosophy, and related fields. Participants might explore how voices engender movement(s) and transform bodies, or how movement(s) in turn can stimulate recognition of unheard or otherwise suppressed voices and lead to change. These can be voices and movements within the ancient world, within the university, or within our modern disciplines. The study of agency, expressed through the problematic body/language dichotomy, addresses critical questions not only in scholarly work but also in the governance, makeup, and power dynamics of our fields, currently and historically. Now, perhaps more than ever, is a critical time for us to consider ourselves as students of bodies past and present, as embodied scholars, and to interrogate the repercussions of body normativity -- from race and gender to neurodiversity, dis/ability, and body types -- on our work and our profession.

All submissions are due September 1, 2019. FemClas 2020 welcomes individual papers, organized panels, workshops, roundtables, posters, author-meets-critic sessions, and other, innovative forms of programming. We encourage submissions from the widest possible range of perspectives, addressing all areas of the ancient world and its legacies. We also welcome proposals especially from related interest groups (such as Mountaintop, Eos Africana, the Asian and Asian American Classical Caucus, MRECC, Classics & Social Justice, the Lambda Classical Caucus, the Women's Classical Caucus, and EuGeSta) and from allied disciplines (e.g., English, comparative literature, media studies, environmental humanities, animal studies and Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies).

Proposals should aim for an abstract of approximately 300 words (not counting works cited), and should be anonymous where possible.

To submit a proposal for an individual paper or poster, visit: https://forms.gle/5hnCYHaCaMKREfrm8

To submit a proposal for any other type of session, visit: https://forms.gle/MDdu4DdqpPq82a8w5

We are enthusiastic about developing a program that will work toward making our intellectual community more welcoming and accessible to all. For this reason, we invite with special emphasis proposals for workshops, roundtables, and the like (creative formats welcome!) that will offer practical training about e.g. implicit bias, sexual harassment, racism, accessibility, developing diversity statements, and so forth.

The organizers (T. H. M. Gellar-Goad and Emily Austin) and the Program Committee of FemClas 2020 are committed to an inclusive, welcoming, and accommodating conference. Submissions from graduate students, contingent and underemployed faculty, and independent scholars are especially welcome. Submissions from undergraduate students are also welcome and will be considered separately for a dedicated panel. We will be able to provide reduced conference fees and some travel assistance for attendance by participants who cannot obtain institutional support.

As part of submission, registration, and attendance at the conference, we will ask you to agree to our conference Code of Conduct & Anti-Harassment Policy, which prohibits harassment and discrimination of any kind. A trained, experienced Anti-Harassment Administrator who is not a member of the discipline will receive and address or refer complaints about harassment and violations of the code of conduct. The Code of Conduct & Anti-Harassment Policy is available here: https://femclas2020.wordpress.com/code-of-conduct/

FemClas 2020 will take place partially on the downtown campus of Wake Forest University and partially at a nearby hotel. Each site is fully accessible for all forms of mobility. At each site there will be all-gender bathrooms, a lactation room, a quiet room, and on-site childcare (which we hope to offer at no extra cost).

Some states prohibit using state funds to travel to North Carolina, despite the partial repeal of NC HB-2. Wake Forest University, as a private institution, is not subject to NC state legislative regulations of public universities, and Wake Forest has a non-discrimination policy inclusive of sexual orientation and gender identity and expression: https://titleix.wfu.edu/nondiscrimination-statement/

Please contact T. H. M. Gellar-Goad at thmgg@wfu.edu with questions.

Website: http://femclas2020.wordpress.com

 

 

MINISTERIUM SERMONIS: AN INTERNATIONAL COLLOQUIUM ON ST. AUGUSTINE’S SERMONS

KU Leuven, Belgium: 27-29 May 2020

On 27-29 May 2020, the research units History of Church and Theology and Literary Studies: Latin Literature of KU Leuven will organize, in collaboration with the C1-project Magnum opus et arduum: Towards a History of the Reception of Augustine’s De civitate Dei and the ERC-project Patristic Sermons in the Middle Ages: The Dissemination, Manipulation, and Interpretation of Late-Antique Sermons in the medieval Latin West, based at Radboud University Nijmegen, the fourth edition of Ministerium Sermonis.

This conference will bring together scholars who have recently made important contributions to the study of Augustine’s sermons. It is a sequel to the series of Ministerium Sermonis- conferences organised in Leuven-Turnhout (May 30-31, 2008), Rome (September 15-17, 2011) and Malta (April 08-10, 2015), the proceedings of which have been published in the series Instrumenta Patristica et Mediaevalia 53, 65 & 75 (Turnhout: Brepols 2009, 2012, 2017). The following survey offers some possible topics, but does not intend to exclude alternative issues or approaches:

(1) The transmission and reception of Augustine’s sermons
(2) Augustine’s argumentation (doctrine, exegesis and rhetoric)
(3) Political doctrine(s) and praxis in Latin Patristic sermons

Committed keynote speakers and respondents include: Isabelle Bochet, Johannes Brachtendorf, James Patout Burns, Gillian Clarke, Jérémy Delmulle, Max Diesenberger, François Dolbeau, Marie Pauliat, Els Rose, Clemens Weidmann.

If you would like to deliver a lecture during this conference, please send the provisional title, abstract (max. 500 words) and a concise CV (max. 500 words) before 31 May 2019, to Shari Boodts at s.boodts@let.ru.nl.

We will let you know whether your paper is included by 1 July 2019. All participants are kindly invited to announce the definitive title of their lecture and a short abstract before 31 December 2019. Lectures should be approx. 20 minutes long, followed by a general discussion of 10 minutes. The organizing committee has the intention of publishing the contributions to the conference as quickly as possible in the international series Instrumenta Patristica et Mediaevalia, published by Brepols Publishers.

The colloquium will take place in Leuven at the historical location of the Dutch College (Hollands College), where Cornelius Jansenius served as first president, and the historical Park Abbey, where Erasmus discovered Lorenzo Valla’s New Testament Notes. More practical information will follow when your abstract is accepted.

The full Call for Papers may be found here: https://shariboodts.weebly.com/news.html

(CFP closed May 31, 2019)

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June 2020

#CFP [PRE-CALL] TEACHING CONFLICT RESOLUTION FROM ANTIQUITY TO THE PRESENT

Manaus (Universidade do Estado do Amazonas), Brazil: June 9-12, 2020

Organisers: Dr. Martin Dinter (King’s College London), Dr. Carlos Renato Rosário de Jesus, Dra. Vanúbia Moncayo, and Dra. Maristela Silva (Universidade do Estado do Amazonas)

We welcome expressions of interest for 30-minute papers to be presented at this workshop, which will take place as part of the 3rd Semana Internacional de Estudos Clássicos do Amazonas (SECLAM); for information on previous iterations of this conference, see https://sites.google.com/prod/uea.edu.br/temas-classicos.

The theme of this workshop, which follows on from two previous events in Bogotá (April 2019) and London (July 2019), is ‘The Pedagogy of Conflict Resolution’. Hence, participants might choose to present accounts of existing projects integrating the Classics and conflict resolution outreach or develop plans for future programmes combining these subjects. Participants may also wish to explore how educators can mitigate the emotional impact of potentially sensitive classroom discussions on violence and war or even approach the workshop’s theme from an ancient history perspective by exploring how the ancients addressed subjects such as warfare and peacekeeping when educating youths. We also encourage speakers to examine how conflict resolution structures found in both ancient and modern literature might be practically implemented within Brazil and Colombia. Possible case studies include a region-specific reworking of Shay’s (1994) report, which compares post-traumatic stress disorder in Vietnam War veterans to Achilles’ emotional state in the Iliad.

The key questions to be answered during this exploration are: How can we, as educators, best implement Classics-related modules on conflict resolution for students at the secondary and tertiary level? What are the lessons to be learnt from initiatives – both successful and unsuccessful, and ancient as well as modern – which center upon introducing conflict-affected populations to the Classics? How can the knowledge accumulated throughout this project be used to improve the pedagogical materials which we have designed for use in schools?

Contact Information: Please send all expressions of interest or queries to the Principal Investigator, Dr. Martin Dinter (martin.dinter@kcl.ac.uk). Please note that all participants will require proof of yellow fever vaccination in order to travel to Manaus.

Further information relating to this workshop series can be found online at our project site: https://sites.google.com/view/conflictandclassics/home.

Confirmed Speakers
Anni Marcelli Santos de Jesus, PUC-MG/UniNorte (Brazil)
Paula da Cunha Correa, Universidade de São Paulo (Brazil)
Marcos Martinho, Universidade de São Paulo (Brazil)
Gilson Charles dos Santos, Universidade de Brasília (Brazil)
Charlene Miotti, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora (Brazil)
Leni Ribeiro Leite, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo (Brazil)
Andrea Lozano Vásquez, Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá (Colombia)
Ana Filipa Patinha Prata, Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá (Colombia)
Gemma Bernadó Ferrer, Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá (Colombia)
Ronald Forero Álvarez, Universidad de La Sabana (Colombia)
Rodrigo Verano, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (Spain)
Kathryn Tempest, University of Roehampton (UK)
Rebecca Langlands, University of Exeter (UK)
Emma Buckley, St. Andrews (UK)
David Whetham, King’ College London (UK)
Astrid Khoo, Harvard University (USA)
Sara Monoson, Northwestern University (USA)

Project Summary: The AHRC Research Networking project ‘Conflict Resolution through Classical Literature’ forms connections between academic research in Classics and War Studies and peace-building education in two Latin American target countries: Brazil and Colombia. The project is characterized by its double aim of research and outreach.

In three workshops – Bogota (April 2019), London (July 2019), and Manaus (June 2020) –participating scholars will produce new research on how Classical literature communicates and showcases conflict resolution skills, and develop ways of employing Classical literature in communicating these skills to conflict-affected youth. In so doing, they will examine ancient models of conflict resolution and map these onto the current political situation in Colombia and Brazil. In addition, they will evaluate how the Classics have historically informed pedagogical initiatives in these countries and devise ways in which ancient literature can continue to enhance peace-related education.

Call: https://sites.google.com/view/conflictandclassics/call-for-papers-workshop-3

 

 

#CFP ISRAEL SOCIETY FOR THE PROMOTION OF CLASSICAL STUDIES - 49TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE

Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel: June 10-11, 2020

The Israel Society for the Promotion of Classical Studies is pleased to announce its 49th annual conference to be held at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev on Wed-Thurs, 10-11 JUNE 2020. Our keynote speaker in 2020 will be Professor Sheila Murnaghan, Alfred Reginald Allen Memorial Professor of Greek, University of Pennsylvania.

The conference is the annual meeting of the society. Papers are welcome on a wide range of classical subjects, including but not limited to history, philology, philosophy, literature, reception, papyrology, and archaeology of Greece and Rome,and neighboring lands. The time limit for each lecture is 20 minutes. The official languages of the conference are English and Hebrew.

Conference fee is $50. Accommodation at reduced prices will be available at local hotels. Registration forms with a list of prices will be sent to participants in due course.

All proposals should consist of a one page abstract (about 250-300 words). Proposals in Hebrew should also be accompanied by a one-page abstract in English to appear in the conference brochure.

Proposals, abstracts and other correspondence should be sent to Dr. Lisa Maurice, Secretary of the ISPCS, at lisa.maurice@biu.ac.il

All proposals should reach the secretary by 19th DECEMBER, 2019.

Decisions will be made after the organizing committee has duly considered all the proposals. If a decision is required prior to early February, please indicate this in your letter and we will try to accommodate your needs.

Call: https://listserv.liv.ac.uk/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind1907&L=CLASSICISTS&P=2484

 

 

#CFP SYMPOSIUM CUMANUM 2020: GENERIC INTERPLAY IN AND AFTER VERGIL

Villa Vergiliana, Cuma, Italy: June 24–26, 2020

Co-directors: Brittney Szempruch (United States Air Force Academy) and John F. Miller (University of Virginia)

Although Vergil famously opens the Aeneid with a definitive statement of poetic intent—arma virumque cano—scholarship has long highlighted the poet’s propensity for the complication of firm generic boundaries. Amid a range of theoretical responses that have shaped the past nearly one hundred years (Kroll 1924; Cairns 1972; Fowler 1982; Conte 1986; Harrison 2007), the Vergilian corpus has emerged as some of the most productive ground for the in-depth study of generic flexibility (e.g. Nelis 2004; Seider 2016).

On its broadest level, this symposium aims to bring together scholars to discuss how the works of Vergil illuminate questions about genre and literary identity in the ancient world. In addition to looking at generic interplay in Vergil’s poetry, we seek to examine the role that genre has played in Vergil’s afterlife, both among his contemporaries and in later ages: how, particularly in relation to Vergil’s poems, did genre create or elide perceived boundaries and/or affiliations between authors in antiquity? What cultural implications did explicit or implicit generic interplay have? How has genre shaped not only our understanding of Vergil and what it meant to be an Augustan poet, but our reception (‘after’ in another sense) of the earlier genres with which he engaged? What do we gain and lose by putting Vergil at the forefront of this narrative?

Both textual studies and theoretical interventions are welcome. Papers might consider (but are not limited to) the following topics:

• ‘Greek’ vs. ‘Roman’ genres across Vergil’s poetry
• Vergil’s reception of Hellenistic generic theory and experimentation
• the presence of nonpoetic genres (scientific, philosophical, etc.) in the Vergilian corpus
• hymn, epigram, and tragedy in Vergil
• elegy and Vergilian pastoral
• ‘didactic’ and heroic epic
• the reception of Vergilian generic conventions
• the centrality of (and/or bias toward) Vergil in discussions of genre in antiquity

Speakers will include Giancarlo Abbamonte (Naples–Federico II), Alessandro Barchiesi (NYU), Sergio Casali (Rome–Tor Vergata), Stephen Harrison (Oxford), Julia Hejduk (Baylor), Alison Keith (Toronto), Giuseppe La Bua (Rome–Sapienza), James O’Hara (UNC Chapel Hill), Vassiliki Panoussi (William & Mary), Stefano Rebeggiani (USC), Fabio Stok (Rome–Tor Vergata), and Adriana Vazquez (UCLA).

Papers will be 20 minutes long with ample time for discussion. Participants will arrive on June 23 followed by three full days of papers, discussion, and visits to Vergilian sites.

Interested scholars should send an abstract of no more than 300 words to vergilandgenre2020@gmail.com by December 1, 2019.

For inquiries and further information, contact the directors: Brittney Szempruch (brittney.szempruch@usafa.edu); John Miller (jfm4j@virginia.edu)

Cited Works
Cairns, F. 1972. Generic Composition in Greek and Roman Poetry. Edinburgh.
Conte, G. B. 1986. The Rhetoric of Imitation: Genre and Poetic Memory in Virgil and Other Latin Poets. Cornell.
Fowler, A. 1982. Kinds of Literature: An Introduction to the Theory of Genres and Modes. Harvard.
Nelis, D. 2004. “From Didactic to Epic: Georgics 2.458–3.48.” In Latin Epic and Didactic Poetry: Genre, Tradition and Individuality, ed. M. Gale. Swansea: 73-107.
Harrison, S. J. 2007. Generic Enrichment in Vergil and Horace. Oxford.
Kroll, W. 1924. “Die Kreuzung der Gattungen.” Studien zum Verständnis der römischen Literatur: 202–24.
Seider, A. M. 2016. “Genre, Gallus, and Goats: Expanding the Limits of Pastoral in Eclogues 6 and 10.” Vergilius 62: 3–23.

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/scs-news/cfp-generic-interplay-and-after-vergil

 

 

#CFP WRITING ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL SAME-SEX DESIRE: GOALS, METHODS, CHALLENGES

Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand: June 30-July 2, 2020

For several decades now, scholars have devoted attention to same-sex desire in both ancient times and the centuries that followed. Not surprisingly, there have been vigorous debates over how to go about it. These debates have been framed in various ways. Here are some examples:

* essentialism VERSUS constructivism;
* Foucauldian discourse analysis VERSUS approaches inspired by psychoanalysis;
* (the impossibility of) objective history VERSUS (overly) subjective history;
* perception of commonalities across time VERSUS rigorously historicizing insistence on the past's alterity;
* positivism VERSUS imaginative reconstruction of contemporaneous receptions.

These dichotomies, which are both reductive and don't exhaust the possibilities, continue to crackle with contention. They also continue to undergird and even disturb current scholarly endeavours.

We are looking for papers (30 minutes in length) in which scholars not only speak about primary source material but also reflect explicitly on the theoretical orientation of their work (see the dichotomies above for examples) and the purpose(s) of (their) scholarship on same-sex desire. An additional objective of this conference will be an edited volume of papers that will aim to showcase a variety of approaches to this important topic.

Please send proposals (c. 500 words) to Mark Masterson writingsamesexdesire@gmail.com by 1 December 2019. If you have any questions, please send them to him at this address also.

In your proposal include:
1) the primary source material/historical milieu to be discussed, and
2) the general theoretical basis of the work

Call: https://cms.victoria.ac.nz/slc/about/events/writing-ancient-and-medieval-same-sex-desire-goals,-methods,-challenges/call-for-papers

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July 2020

#CFP THE MARY RENAULT PRIZE

Applications close: July annually.

The deadline for the 2020 Mary Renault Prize competition is: TBA.

The Mary Renault Prize is a Classical Reception essay prize for school or college sixth form pupils, awarded by the Principal and Fellows of St Hugh’s College, and funded by the royalties from Mary Renault’s novels.

The Principal and Fellows of St Hugh’s College offer two or more Prizes, worth up to £300 each, for essays on classical reception or influence submitted by pupils who, at the closing date, have been in the Sixth Form of any school or college for a period of not more than two years. The prizes are in memory of the author Mary Renault, who is best known for her historical novels set in ancient Greece, recently reissued by Virago. Renault read English at St Hugh’s in the 1920s and subsequently taught herself ancient Greek. Her novels have inspired many thousands of readers to pursue the study of Classics at University level and beyond. At least one prize will be awarded a pupil who is not studying either Latin or Greek to A-level standard. The winning essay will be published on the College’s website. Teachers wishing to encourage their students to enter the competition can download, display and circulate the competition poster in the ‘related documents’ section.

Essays can be from any discipline and should be on a topic relating to the reception of classical antiquity – including Greek and Roman literature, history, political thought, philosophy, and material remains – in any period to the present; essays on reception within classical antiquity (for instance, receptions of literary or artistic works or of mythical or historical figures) are permitted. Your submission must be accompanied by a completed information cover sheet. Essays should be between two-thousand and four-thousand words and submitted by the candidate as a Microsoft Word document through the form below.

Website: https://www.st-hughs.ox.ac.uk/prospectivestudents/outreach/mary-renault-prize/

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August 2020

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September 2020

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October 2020

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November 2020

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December 2020

#CFP SENECA 2020. INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE. WHAT MORE CAN WE SAY ABOUT SENECA?

University of Lisbon, Portugal: December 14-17, 2020

The Centre for Classical Studies of the School of Arts and Humanities of the University of Lisbon is organizing an International Conference on Seneca to promote and encourage a critical reflection on the permanence of themes, values, perspectives and representations of Seneca's works in Western literature and culture.

The Conference will take place between 14-17 December 2020, and, through the interdisciplinary debate of the contribution given by the experiences of researchers from different fields of study, it aims:

- to think of how Seneca became one of the most prominent figures in Western culture;
- to consider, examine and reflect on our current knowledge about Seneca, his life and works;
- to explore new study angles and what remains to be said about Seneca in the Twenty-First Century, in light of the renewed interest shown in his works.

Confirmed Keynote Speakers:
António Pedro Mesquita (University of Lisbon)
Alessandro Schiesaro (University of Manchester)
Catharine Edwards (University of Cambridge)
Gareth David Williams (Columbia University)
Chiara Torre (University of Milan)
Jesús Luque Moreno (University of Granada)
José Pedro Serra (University of Lisbon)
Martha Nussbaum (University of Chicago)
Paulo Sérgio Ferreira (University of Coimbra)

For further information, please visit our website: https://sites.google.com/view/seneca2020/p%C3%A1gina-inicial

Call for papers closes: January 31, 2020.

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Seneca2020

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/scs-news/conference-seneca-2020

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2021

RECEPTION AND EMOTIONS

University of Western Australia, Perth: date TBA

ANZAMEMS (Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies) is pleased to announce that the location of the Thirteenth Biennial ANZAMEMS Conference in 2021 will be The University of Western Australia, in Perth, Western Australia! The conference convenor will be Dr Kirk Essary, and the conference topic will be 'Reception and Emotions.' More details will be announced. #anza21

Website: https://anzamems.org/

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January 2021

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