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Conferences

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November 2019

LECTIO DOCTORAL SEMINAR: THE CHURCH FATHERS IN THE REFORMATION AND EARLY MODERN ERA

Leuven, Belgium: November 6, 2019

Every year, LECTIO (Leuven Centre for the Study of the Transmission of Texts and Ideas in Antiquity, the Middle Ages and the Renaissance) awards the LECTIO Chair to a renowned scholar specialized in one of the disciplines studied by LECTIO researchers. Holder of the 2019 LECTIO Chair is prof. John Monfasani (University at Albany). In addition to his public lecture on Thursday 7 November 2019 entitled “The Letters of Ignatius of Antioch as a Philological and Epistemological Issue from the Reformation to Today”, the day before (6 November 2019), he will give a doctoral seminar on “The Church Fathers in the Reformation and Early Modern Era.”

Theme: In a brilliant Leuven dissertation of 1932, “L’Élément historique dans la controverse religieuse du XVIe siècle”, Pontien Polman, OFM, analyzed how Protestant and Catholic historians treated the history of the Church. One crucial aspect, however, of these historical investigations not studied by Polman, save in passing, was the way scholars approached individual Church Fathers. The study of the Fathers involved editions, translations, commentaries, and a variety of other philological and historical publications that continue to this very day. The study of, and debates about, the Apostolic Fathers Clement of Rome and Ignatius of Antioch are a case in point. But the same can be said of all the Fathers, pre-Nicene as well as post-Nicene. What is especially interesting to observe is how specific scholars from the sixteenth century onward reacted, often in contrary ways, to a given Church Father or to a set of Church Fathers. There is a large and growing literature on the Church Fathers in the Reformation era, but much remains to be investigated.

On the occasion of this seminar, LECTIO invites early career researchers (PhD students and postdocs) to submit proposals on how specific scholars from the sixteenth century onward reacted, often in contrary ways, to a given Church Father or to a set of Church Fathers. The selected scholars will be given the opportunity to present their research (20 minutes) and to discuss it with the chair holder and colleagues, both junior and senior. A one-page description of the proposed paper and a short CV should be submitted no later than 6 October 2019 to lectio@kuleuven.be.

PROVISIONAL PROGRAM

Thursday 6 November 2019 | Museumzaal – MSI 02.08 – Erasmusplein 2 Leuven (Belgium)
10.00 Introduction – Prof. dr. Andrea Robiglio (KU Leuven)
10.05 Doctoral Seminar – Prof. dr. John Monfasani (University at Albany) - “The Church Fathers in the Reformation and Early Modern Era”
12.00 Lunch
13.00 Paper session 1 (5 papers)
15.00 Coffee break
15.30 Paper session 2 (5 papers)
17.30 Final conclusions

Wednesday 7 November 2019 | Promotiezaal – University Hall 01.46 – Naamsestraat 22 Leuven (Belgium)
17.00 Public lecture (Lectio Chair) – Prof. dr. John Monfasani (University at Albany): “The Letters of Ignatius of Antioch as a Philological and Epistemological Issue from the Reformation to Today”

Scientific & organizing committee
KU Leuven : Erika Gielen, Andrea Robiglio, Céline Szecel
UGent : Steven Vanden Broecke, Wim Verbaal

Scholars who want to attend the seminar without presenting a paper or the official lecture are also asked to register by 25 October 2019, by sending an email to lectio@kuleuven.be.

For more information , please visit our website (http://lectio.ghum.kuleuven.be/lectio/training-and-tools), or contact erika.gielen@kuleuven.be.

Call: http://lectio.ghum.kuleuven.be/lectio/training-and-tools

(CFP closed October 6, 2019)

 

 

«AERE PERENNIUS»: IL DIALOGO CON L’ANTICO FRA MEDIO EVO E PRIMA MODERNITÀ (‘MORE LASTING THAN BRONZE’. THE DIALOGUE WITH ANTIQUITY BETWEEN THE MIDDLE AGES AND THE EARLY MODERNITY)

Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa, Italy: November 7-8, 2019

PhD course in Literature, Art and History in Medieval and Modern Europe - International Graduate Conference

A group of doctoral students of the first and second year of the PhD course in Literature, Art and History in Medieval and Modern Europe proposes the organisation of the third International Graduate Conference, which is reserved for PhD students and young researchers and will be held at the Scuola Normale Superiore on 7-8 November 2019.

This year, the conference aims to investigate the tradition and recovery of classical and late antique authors in the Middle Ages and early Modernity in their multiple artistic and literary forms (imitatio, reformulation, exegesis, critical reflection on literary genres, etc.). To this end, we welcome proposals for papers relating to the following areas:

1) The classics in Romance philology and literature of the 12th century
1.1) Circulation and transmission of the Latin classics in the Middle Ages.
1.2) The use of the classics in the scholastic education of the first vernacular authors and in the medieval poets of the French area, trait d’union between old and new literary forms.
1.3) Evolution of genres and literary forms from Antiquity to the Middle Ages.
1.4) Critical reflection about Ars poetica.

2) The classical myths between the Middle Ages and the early Renaissance
2.1) Ovid’s images.
2.2) Recovery and reworking of the classics in the late antique and early medieval mythographic production, in particular in Fulgentius’ Mythologiae and in the three Mythographi Vaticani.
2.3) Allegorical and moral exegesis in commentaries on Ovid’s Metamorphoses (12th-14th centuries).

3) The classics in the Italian literature of the Middle Ages and in commentaries to Dante
3.1) The dialogue with Antiquity in Italian literature and art of the 13th-14th centuries: imitation and rewriting of classical sources; reuse of images and metaphors taken from the Antiquity.
3.2) The relationship between the mythographic and allegorical tradition and the Dante’s revival of classical myths.
3.3) Commenting with the classics: the use of classical sources in ancient commentaries and illustrations to Dante’s Comedy.

4) Ancient and Islamic philosophy, vernacular literatures
4.1) Ancient philosophy and its Arabic mediation in Romance literature, between continuity and variations.
4.2) The translation of philosophical texts and their relationships with vernacular literatures.
4.3) The concepts of "philosopher" and "philosophy" in Romance literature.
4.4) The re-elaboration of ancient material in the formation of new concepts such as interiority, artistic "creation" and geographic-mythical representations.

The conference will include the participation, as keynote speakers, of four internationally renowned scholars who have dealt with the themes proposed here, and whose research interests reflect the fourfold articulation of our program:

- Claudia Villa (University of Bergamo – Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa), a medieval and humanist philologist specialised in the study of classical authors’ circulation in the Middle Ages and vernacular culture;
- Claudia Cieri Via (Sapienza University of Rome), an art historian and scholar of iconography and iconology, whose research has focussed on the fortune of Ovid’s Metamorphoses between the 15th and 16th centuries;
- Marco Petoletti (Catholic University of the Sacred Heart of Milan), who is author of numerous essays about medieval epigraphy, ancient commentaries on Dante’s Comedy, Latin literature of the 14th century, with particular reference to Dante, Petrarca and Boccaccio;
- Paolo Falzone (Sapienza University of Rome), who dedicated a large part of his scientific production to the intertwinement of philosophy, theology and politics in Dante’s works.

Proposals (in Italian or English) accompanied by a title, an abstract (of a maximum length of 4000 characters) and a curriculum vitae et studiorum (maximum 3000 characters) must be sent in two separate files to the address aereperennius@sns.it. Each paper should be no longer than twenty minutes.

Requests to participate must be sent by 30 June 2019 and will be submitted to the selection of the organising committee which will communicate the acceptance of the proposals by e-mail by 20 July 2019. The contributions will then be subjected to a rigorous peer-review process in view of the publication of the proceedings. Participation in the Conference is free. The organisation will not provide for the reimbursement of travel and accommodation expenses, but it will provide information on available accommodation.

The organising committee: Susanna Barsotti; Arianna Brunori; Ilaria Ottria; Paola Tricomi; Marina Zanobi

Call: https://www.fabula.org/actualites/aere-perennius-il-dialogo-con-l-antico-fra-medioevo-e-prima-modernit-seminario-dottorale_91179.php

(CFP closed June 30, 2019)

 

 

HOME & HOMECOMINGS: 33RD BIENNIAL CONFERENCE OF THE CLASSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SOUTH AFRICA

University of Stellenbosch, South Africa: November 7-10, 2019

The Classical Association of South Africa (CASA) invites proposals for papers for its 33rd Biennial Conference, to be hosted by the Department of Ancient Studies at the University of Stellenbosch.

We invite submissions that focus on the conference theme "Homes & Homecomings" as well as individual proposals on other aspects of the classical world and its reception. Panels are strongly encouraged and should consist of 3 to 8 related papers put together by the panel chair. We also welcome postgraduate students currently busy with Master’s or Doctoral programmes to submit papers for a "work-in-progress" parallel session.

Please submit a paper title, an abstract (approximately 300 words), and author affiliation to Annemarie de Villiers at amdev@sun.ac.za. The deadline for proposals is 31 May 2019 extended deadline July 15, 2019.

Further information on conference fees and accommodation to follow in due course.

Call: http://www.casa-kvsa.org.za/Conference.htm

(CFP closed July 15, 2019)

 

 

[PANEL] THE RECEPTION OF GREEK SCULPTURE FROM ANTIQUITY UNTIL THE PRESENT

33rd Biennial Conference of The Classical Association of South Africa (see above for general CFP)

University of Stellenbosch, South Africa: November 7-10, 2019

We invite the submission of abstracts for sessions on the theme "The Reception of Greek Sculpture from Antiquity until the Present" as part of the 33rd biennial conference of The Classical Association of South Africa, to be held at Stellenbosch University, 7-10 November 2019. We welcome proposals concerning any aspects of the reception of Greek sculpture from antiquity up until the present.

Keynote Speakers include Prof. Andrew Stewart (Berkeley), Prof. Stanley Burstein, and Prof. Judith Mossman.

Papers in the session will be allotted approximately 20-25 minutes. Please submit an abstract of 200-300 words to Jessica Nitschke at jessnitschke@gmail.com. The deadline for abstracts is 20 May 2019. There is no website for the conference yet, but further details on the conference will be available soon.

Classical Association of South Africa website: http://www.casa-kvsa.org.za/Conference.htm

(CFP closed May 20, 2019)

 

 

THE 12TH ANNUAL BOSTON UNIVERSITY CLASSICAL STUDIES GRADUATE STUDENT CONFERENCE

Theme: Agency through the Ancients: Reception as Empowerment

Department of Classical Studies, Boston University: November 9, 2019

Keynote: Dr. Emily Allen-Hornblower, Rutgers University, and Mr. Marquis "I AM" McCray

The Department of Classical Studies at Boston University invites submissions of abstracts for the 12th Annual Graduate Student Conference. This year, the conference will examine how classical literature (broadly defined) is able to impart a profound sense of agency to the disenfranchised, especially in times of turmoil or persecution. Although we acknowledge that many nationalists, over the centuries and into the present day, have invoked the classics in order to advance their exclusionary agenda, we hope to demonstrate that the classics have the potential to heal, unite, and empower the marginalized. Therefore, this conference will explore the myriad ways in which those who have traditionally remained voiceless have discovered a safe harbor and a sense of solidarity through the literature of ancient Greece, Rome, Egypt, Babylon, etc. Special attention will be given to engagement with the ancient world by groups which have been historically underrepresented or outright excluded.

Possible submission topics include (but are by no means limited to) the reception of classical literature by the following groups or individuals:

* Victims of war (e.g.. Milo Rau’s recent production of the Oresteia in Mosul)
* Veterans (e.g. Theater of War)
* Widowed wives (e.g. Alcyone from Mary Zimmerman’s Metamorphoses)
* Prisoners (e.g. The Medea Project, prison teaching programs like NJ-STEP)
* Women/feminist groups (e.g. Emily Wilson’s translation of the Odyssey)
* Racial minorities (e.g. ‘Antigone in Ferguson’)
* LGBTQ+ communities (e.g. Iphis and Tiresias as trans symbols)
* Those living with physical or mental disabilities (e.g. CripAntiquity)

Papers must be original, unpublished, and written by current graduate students. Please send an abstract (500 words or fewer), a paper title, and a C.V. or short bio to Maya Chakravorty, Peter Kotiuga, Alicia Matz, Joshua Paul, and Amanda Rivera at ancientagency@gmail.com. Papers should be 20 minutes in length and will be followed by a short question and answer session. The deadline for submissions is Friday, August 23, 2019. Selected speakers will be notified by the end of September and are expected to accept or decline the offer within a week of notification.

Call: https://listserv.liv.ac.uk/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind1906&L=CLASSICISTS&P=112955

Program/Registration: http://www.bu.edu/classics/events/graduate-student-conference-2019/

(CFP closed August 23, 2019)

 

 

ON THE MARGINS OF MYTH: HYBRIDISATION OF CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY IN CONTEMPORARY MASS CULTURE ~~ EN LOS MÁRGENES DEL MITO: HIBRIDACIONES DE LA MITOLOGÍA CLÁSICA EN LA CULTURA DE MASAS CONTEMPORÁNEA

Department of Classical Philology, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid: November 11-13, 2019

Amazons, centaurs, lamias, fauns, sirens, satyrs, Medusa, androgynous beings… Since the dawn of Western civilisation, classical myths have provided us with examples of liminal identities and hybrid beings on the margins between the human and the animal, the human and the divine, the masculine and the feminine. Very often, mythical stories offer accounts of alternative sexualities (Narcissus), gender fluidity (Tiresias), impossible carnal relations (such as those involving Zeus under the disguise of different animals), and gender utopias (the Amazons). All these narrations had precise, exemplary, and normative functions in the societies that created them, functions that continue to be the subject of an ongoing debate. In the context of such discussions on the subject, the research project Marginalia Classica Hodierna invites your consideration of the implications and uses of the concept of “hybridisation” as it surfaces in a wide range of retellings of classical myths in different formats of contemporary mass culture: films, music, comics, popular fiction, videogames, advertising, etc. In their variety, all these formats tend to mutually interact and to favour the reappropriation of content from both high and low cultures. But that is not all: they also question the norm and promote the de-hierarchisation of certain models, thus functioning as a vehicle for the expression of countercultural ideas, and, subsequently, giving voice to mainstream culture’s notions and perspectives.

Drawing on these premises, the conference invites proposals that develop, preferably, though not exclusively, issues such as:

* What are the defining features of the deviation from the norm or of the monstrosity that these myths portray? What are these myths used for in the new artefacts of contemporary mass culture?
* How are these stories re-signified? In what ways do they reinforce or subvert the norm?
* What possibilities do these “hybridisation myths” offer for the construction of alternative identities (group, ethnic, sexual, gender...)?
* Through what means and methods are myths re-appropriated in these formats? How is that accomplished, considering that this material is traditionally associated with high culture?
* ...

By discussing these and other related topics, the conference seeks to encourage reflection on the following: what are the dynamics and the agents that allow us to explain the uses, reworkings and reformulations to which these classical myths “on the margins” are put today? To what extent does classical myth respond to the demands of the contemporary world? What are the advantages of using myth in such ways? Ultimately, we wonder about the reasons that might explain the ability of classical myth to appeal to the most intimate concerns of today’s society. In so doing, we also seek to explore the role they play in the reflection of contemporary concerns.

Those interested in attending are invited to send an abstract (in Spanish, English, Italian, French or German) of no more than 300 words (bibliographical references included) to marginaliaclassicahodierna@gmail.com. This document should be sent no later than 30 April 2019. Papers must not exceed the 20-minutes limit. Poster proposals are also accepted, and prospective participants should send a summary of no more than 100 words to the above-mentioned address. All applicants will be notified of either acceptance or rejection by 20 May 2019.

Call: http://marginaliaclassica.es/events/en-los-margenes-del-mito-hibridaciones-de-la-mitologia-clasica-en-la-cultura-de-masas-contemporanea/

(CFP closed April 30, 2019)

 

 

[PANEL/S] ANTIQUI-TECH: INVENTION IN (AND OF) THE ANCIENT MEDITERRANEAN WORLD ON SCREEN

The 2019 Film & History Conference. Theme: Designing Culture and Character - Technology in Film, Television, and New Media

Madison, WI (USA): November 13-17, 2019

Invention has fascinated audiences at least since the god Hephaestus created self-locomoting robot-women as workshop assistants—and Prometheus’ theft of fire allowed humans to develop their own technology. From Méliès’ re-creation of Lucian’s trip to the moon, to myriad takes on Pygmalion fabricating the “perfect woman,” to Hypatia’s fatal scientific inquiry in Amenábar’s Agora, on-screen depictions of invention and technology in the ancient Mediterranean world and the classical tradition have dramatized their potential to delight, empower, and enlighten—as well as the ethical and moral concerns they stimulate.

How do invention and technology stabilize or disrupt social order or tradition—for good or ill? What happens when new tech supplants the once-new? We enjoy the wit of Percy Jackson substituting an iPhone’s reflective surface for Perseus’ shield; can the wonder Ray Harryhausen wrought in Jason & the Argonauts survive the domination of green-screen motion capture animation? What aesthetic or ethical questions arise from eliding realism and the hyperreal in generating Spartan musculature, the Roman Colosseum, or the Olympians? Conversely, is democratization of knowledge spurring viewers’ expectations of “authenticity” in on-screen representations of technology in antiquity, e.g. in architecture or warfare—and if so, to what effects? How does film as a technology rival e.g. archaeology in representing the “reality” of the past?

The Classical Antiquity area solicits abstracts for papers that discuss how film, television, and various other screen-media engage with technology and invention, on topics including, but not limited to:

* representation of invention/technology in narratives set in the ancient Mediterranean world, or informed by the classical tradition (e.g. through plot, character, theme, mise en scène)
* how technology figures in characterization, in combination with morality, racial or cultural identity, and/or the social status of its inventors and/or users
* the ethics of invention/technology within on-screen narratives and in the creation of convincingly realistic or hyperreal worlds on screen
* innovation/technological invention as metaphor for generational or cultural succession
* audience (in)tolerance of anachronisms/interest in “authentic” on-screen worlds

Proposals for complete panels of three related presentations are also welcome, but should include an abstract and contact information (including email) for each presenter.

Please e-mail your proposal (200-400 words per paper) to the area chair: Meredith Safran - classicsonscreen@gmail.com

DEADLINE for abstracts: 1 June 2019

Call: https://camws.org/node/1378

Conference website: http://www.filmandhistory.org/

(CFP closed June 1, 2019)

 

 

COLLECTING AND COLLECTIONS: DIGITAL LIVES AND AFTERLIVES

The Royal Society, 6-9 Carlton House Terrace, London SW1Y 5AG: November 14-15, 2019

The shift from the disordered Kunstkammer or curiosity cabinet of the Renaissance to the ordered Enlightenment museum is well known. What has to be explored fully is the process through which this transformation occurred. Collective Wisdom, funded by an AHRC International Networking Grant, explores how and why members of the Royal Society, the Society of Antiquaries of London and the Leopoldina (in Halle, Germany) collected specimens of the natural world, art, and archaeology in the 17th and 18th centuries. In three international workshops, we are analysing the connections between these scholarly organisations, natural philosophy, and antiquarianism, and to what extent these networks shaped the formation of early museums and their categorisation of knowledge. Workshop III, concerning the afterlives, use and reconstruction of early modern collections is designed to benefit scholars interested in digital humanities.

Registration, programme, and abstracts: https://royalsociety.org/science-events-and-lectures/2019/11/collecting-and-collections/

 

 

[PANEL] GRECO-ROMAN ANTIQUITY IN GAMES

Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association (PAMLA) Meeting

San Diego, CA, USA: November 14-17, 2019

This panel seeks to stimulate and further conversation about how Greco-Roman traditions have been put to use in games—video games, board games, and role-playing games (RPGs). While some scholarship on this topic has emerged in the past decade, major questions remain open: how do games use Mediterranean antiquity? how do they enable players to imagine themselves into ancient spaces, playing at being ‘Greek’ or ‘Roman’? and how might such imaginative spaces challenge the way we theorize classical receptions? We invite papers examining the reception of ancient Greek and Roman materials (literature, history, philosophy, art history, etc.) in games of any format, including video games, board games, and RPGs.

Organisers: Benjamin Stevens (Trinity University), Brett Rogers (University of Puget Sound)

PAMLA Conference: http://pamla.org/2019

Call/Abstract portal: https://pamla.ballastacademic.com/Home/S/17947.

 

 

ORDER‽ ART, CLASSICISM, AND DISCOURSE, FROM 1755 TO TODAY

Henry Moore Institute, Leeds, United Kingdom: November 15-16, 2019

In 1851 the Jury for Sculpture at the Great Exhibition shared their criteria for works of art in their class:

"They have looked for originality of invention, more or less happily expressed in that style which has for twenty-three centuries been the wonder of every civilised people, and the standard of excellence to which artists of the highest order have endeavoured to attain."

In so many words, the esteemed gentlemen of the Jury (and they were all gentlemen) demanded of their sculptors one thing - classicism, or the antique. Fewer than a hundred years earlier, Johann Joachim Winckelmann’s writings on the art of the ancient world had promoted a systematic, ordered idea of the progress of art; less than a hundred years later, the aftermath of World War I caused artists to invoke a return to order across Europe - a return to classicism, stability, and the simplicity of antiquity. Today, the classics, classicism, and antiquity are still hotly contested visual, literary and cultural forms and norms.

But what is ordered about ‘classicism’? Who benefits from an ordered, stable canon of classicism in art and literature? Is classicism, in art, architecture, archaeology and academia truly the realm of the dead white men (to borrow from the title of Donna Zuckerberg’s 2018 book, Not All Dead White Men)? This conference seeks to challenge, reassess, and provoke discussion on the position of ‘classicism’ in art following Winckelmann’s seminal text on the topic in 1755 through to the present day. Winckelmann’s ordered, teleological histories of art have been thrown into disarray by 265 years of new archaeological discoveries; every generation develops its own ‘classic’ and its own canon. Technologies of communication, dissemination, modification, and reproduction offer artists and academics new media for their engagement with classicism, art, and the world; previously unrepresented populations and individuals have more access to academia, art, and classics than ever before, but not without opposition.

Responding to recent publications, exhibitions, and discussions in art history, classics, and contemporary society and politics, this conference seeks to interrogate classicisms in art (broadly conceived on both fronts). This event follows recent projects like the Classical Now exhibition at King’s College London (2017/18), Rodin and the Art of Ancient Greece at the British Museum (2018), and scholarship on the use of antiquity in contemporary discourse. We will not look to construct a new order or return to an old, but to challenge, explore, and activate new discussions on the use, abuse, and reuse of ‘classicism’ through history and today. Furthermore, in a historic moment of increased fascism and nationalism, this conference offers an opportunity to publicly interrogate the role classics, classicism, and the reception of antiquity in art has had in upholding oppressive power structures. This event will be held alongside a Henry Moore Institute retrospective exhibition of the work of Edward Allington (1951-2017), an exhibition that will consider the creative engagement of Allington with the cultures of classicism.

Within this framework we invite submissions of 250-300 words from scholars and artists at every career level for papers on topics involving classicism and art from 1755 to today. Preference will be given to papers that highlight or focus on sculptural material, with a broad definition of ‘sculpture’. Suggested themes include, but are by no means limited to:

* Gendered uses of classicism in art
* Queer classicisms
* Non-Western classicisms
* Contemporary art practice and uses of ‘classicism’
* Problematic or challenging ‘classical’ objects
* Canon and canonising
* The classical/anti-classical and politics
* Nationalism, internationalism and empire
* Narrative, title and text as ordering principles

Please send abstracts and a brief bio to Kirstie Gregory (kirstie.gregory@henry-moore.org) and Dr Melissa Gustin (mlg519@york.ac.uk) by 8 April 2019 extended deadline 15 April 2019.

A postgraduate/early career scholar workshop will precede the conference on the morning of Friday 15 November offering PGR/ECRs working in any discipline on issues of classicism, canon, and antiquity the opportunity to meet their peers and foster new networks. The workshop will invite delegates to give short, informal presentations about their work, offer feedback to their peers, and make connections before attending the conference. Postgraduate students are welcome to submit abstracts for the conference as well as participating in the workshop.

Call: https://www.henry-moore.org/research/opportunities/call-for-papers/order-art-classicism-and-discourse-from-1755-to-today

(CFP ended April 15, 2019)

 

 

III YOUNG RESEARCHERS CONFERENCE ANIWEH – V SHRA: RECEPTIONS OF ANTIQUITY FROM THE MIDDLE AGES TO THE CONTEMPORARY WORLD

University of the Basque Country, Vitoria-Gasteiz, Basque Country, Spain: November 20, 2019

ANIWEH research project (https://aniho.hypotheses.org/) along with SHRA project invites submissions of abstracts for the III Young Researchers Conference ANIWEH – V SHRA: Receptions of Antiquity from the Middle Ages to the Contemporary World. The meeting is scheduled for November 20 in the Faculty of Arts at the University of the Basque Country, located in Vitoria-Gasteiz (Basque Country, Spain).

The deadline for submissions is Friday, September 20, 2019.

Find all the information about the CFP on our webpage: https://aniho.hypotheses.org/1539

(CFP ended September 20, 2019)

 

 

WARFARE IN ANTIQUITY CONFERENCE: PERCEPTIONS, REALITIES, AND RECEPTION IN THE 21ST CENTURY

Kings College London, UK: November 23, 2019

Warfare in antiquity has captivated academics and enthusiasts alike for millennia. Several works, including specialist manuals (e.g. Asclepiodotus’ Tactics; Vegetius’ Epitome of Military Science) and historiographical discussions (e.g. Caesar’s Commentaries; Procopius’ History of the Wars), indicate clearly that ancient societies were fascinated by the workings of both contemporary and earlier methods of warfare. This interest has endured all the way to the modern era and has yielded a much deeper understanding of ancient warfare from various perspectives. Academic movements like the ‘face of battle’ studies started by John Keegan in the 1970s and the ‘war and society’ publications in the 1990s are prime examples of how our understanding of ancient warfare continues to evolve. With the emergence and flourishing of ‘specialised’ academic research in the past two decades, the study of warfare in antiquity has grown into as diverse a discipline as the cultures it aims to study. The ‘specialisation’ trend of academia has afforded both academics and enthusiasts the opportunity to delve deeper and challenge long held perceptions and assumptions. Such challenges have the potential to shift (or in some cases reaffirm) the way modern scholars understand warfare in antiquity.

Recognizing the tremendous work being done on warfare in antiquity and considering the lack of platforms afforded to academics and enthusiasts to discuss their respective research and interests this academic year, we are proud to announce the Warfare in Antiquity Conference. We invite those interested to submit proposals that discuss various aspects of warfare in the ancient world, in particular those in a dialogue with established schools of thought in and perceptions of the discipline. The event is focused upon realities, in terms of both the ancient armed forces and ancient conceptions of their experiences, and also modern scholarship, with new hypotheses and arguments building upon and challenging accepted theories. We cordially invite proposals on all aspects of ancient warfare, particularly those which deal with the conference themes of Perceptions, Realities, and Reception.

Proposals should include a 300 word abstract along with a few words about the applicant – their research interests, university affiliation and / or status etc. Separately in the body of the email, please provide your full name, contact email address and university affiliation.

The conference will be held on SATURDAY NOVEMBER 23RD 2019, AT KING'S COLLEGE LONDON.

The DEADLINE for submissions will be 5 P.M. on AUGUST 31ST, 2019.

Please send all submissions for papers as a Word Document to WACon2019@gmail.com

Call: https://listserv.liv.ac.uk/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind1907&L=CLASSICISTS&P=12904

Program: https://www.kcl.ac.uk/events/warfare-in-antiquity-conference-2019-perceptions-realties-and-reception-in-the-21st-century

(CFP closed August 31, 2019)

 

 

MEANING, MEMORY, AND MOVEMENT: ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL SPACES

University of Birmingham, UK: November 23-24, 2019

The process of stopping and looking back at the past through new methodological lenses over the last half-century has comprised a series of fruitful cross-disciplinary ‘turns’. These retrospective global movements have provided academia with innovative ways of shedding light on past civilisations through a shared analytical model that prioritises a specific focus. During the second half of the twentieth century the ‘turn to space’ found its roots in erudite thinkers such as Foucault and Lefebvre who positioned space as a critical analytical tool for understanding social existence in the areas of geography, urban planning, and architecture. In recent years, this framework has found cadence throughout the social sciences and humanities and has transitioned from being an experimental, innovative, sometimes controversial tool, to a necessary critical model for studies of the past. The intention of our conference is to (re)turn again to space and to stimulate fresh conversations across temporal and cultural disciplinary boundaries through collective spatial analysis.

Our tripartite conference name encapsulates the broad and valuable facets of recent approaches to the study of space: spaces contain, facilitate, and organise meaning for societies, they perpetuate, (re)construct, and direct memory, and movement through and around space underpins these processes. Furthermore, the obvious opportunity for overlapping angles and approaches is indicative of the fluidity of these multifaceted constructs and the incongruity of a ‘correct’ interpretation of space.

We believe in juxtaposing approaches and perspectives from different temporal, cultural, and geographical contexts in order to elicit cross-disciplinary dissemination, networking, and productivity. Therefore, we envisage grouping together temporally divergent papers into a number of focussed thematic panels. We hope to support a productive interdisciplinary environment that will enable researchers to, on the one hand, look retrospectively at their research in a new light, and on the other, to consider innovative approaches to their future research avenues. We invite abstracts for papers, from Postgraduate and Early Career Researchers, on an intentionally broad range of themes:

– Spaces of cultural memory: how do spaces contain and perpetuate memories, develop self and collective conceptions of culture, and shape identities?
– Organising space: how are spatial borders articulated? How are they internally ordered? How are spaces framed, deframed and reframed? What are the intended and unintended consequences of spatial organisation?
– Liminal spaces: from geographical and cultural borders to micro level entrances and exits of certain sites and sights.
– Spatial taxonomy and typology: how do we define space – political, religious, private, public, etc.?
– Gendered spaces: how does gender operate and develop within space(s)?
– Representation of spaces: comparing and contrasting between literary, visual, material and archaeological media.
– Movement and space: space and time, processional movement, traversing, lustrating, navigating, entering and leaving. How does movement generate space?

Confirmed Keynote Speaker: Prof. Diana Spencer (University of Birmingham)

(more to be announced)

Proposals should be submitted as an abstract of no more than 300 words and should be accompanied by a short bio (no more than 100 words) indicating the speaker’s current position, location, and research interests. These should be sent to a.m.spacesconference@gmail.com by the 16th August 2019. Our team will evaluate proposals and respond to candidates by the end of August and provide a preliminary idea of the themed panel they will be allocated to. We look forward to reading your proposals and hearing about your research.

The Organising Committee: Ben Salisbury (University of Birmingham); Ben White (University of Nottingham - Lead Organiser); Curtis Lisle (University of Birmingham); Liam McLeod (University of Birmingham); Thomas Quigley (University of Manchester); Chris Rouse (University of Birmingham).

Twitter: @SpaceConference

Call: https://amspaces.wordpress.com/call-for-papers/

(CFP closed August 16, 2019)

 

 

THIRD INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE IN ANCIENT FRAGMENTARY DRAMA "THE FORGOTTEN THEATRE

University of Turin, Italy: November 26-29, 2019

The Centro Studi sul Teatro Classico – University of Turin (www.teatroclassico.unito.it) is delighted to circulate the CALL FOR PAPERS for the Third International Conference in Ancient Fragmentary Drama "The Forgotten Theatre" - University of Turin, 26th-29th of November 2019.

THE CONFERENCE: School education has consecrated, since ancient times, a canon of dramatic theatrical works capable of representing wonderfully the genius and essence of Greco-Roman theatre. This canon has helped direct scholars’ attention to some works of dramatic literature at the expense of the ancient tragedians and playwrights, causing a critical oversight of some works within the tradition of classical theatre - long considered to be of lesser value - especially those preserved in a fragmentary fashion or known by an indirect tradition. The International Conference The Forgotten Theatre aims, for the third consecutive year, to be a stimulus to revitalize academic interest in fragmentary Greco-Roman dramatic texts, long relegated to the sidelines of scientific research and contemporary theatre productions. The conference will host academics at any stage of their career, who wish to collaborate in order to cast new light on the forgotten theatre through their studies.

TOPICS OF DISCUSSION - The conference will accept some papers concerning primarily, but not exclusively, the following research areas:

* Criticism, commentary and constitutio textus of fragmentary dramatic Greek and Latin works, both tragic and comic;
* Well-reasoned attempts to reconstruct the plot of tragedies (or entire trilogies/ tetralogies) that are either fragmentary, incomplete or known by indirect tradition.
* New considerations of matters concerning the contents and representations of fragmentary dramas, with special emphasis given to evidence of-fered by internal captions, marginalia and scholia;
* The development of Greek and Latin dramatic genres with particular attention to the influence exerted on them by other forms of mimetic art (such as kitharodia, dance, mime);
* Research on minor Greek, Latin, Magna Graecia and Etruscan theatrical traditions;
* The use of iconographic, epigraphic, archaeological, papyrological and codicological sources in the study of ancient drama;
* The contribution of historical-anthropological disciplines (anthropology, historiography, philosophy, psychology) to the study of ancient drama;
* The reception of the Greco-Roman drama in the arts and literature of later periods (in imperial, late imperial, medieval and Byzantine times).

CONFERENCE ORGANISATION - The conference days will develop according to the following days and programme:

* Tuesday 26th - Wednesday 27th November‬ The Forgotten Theatre - PGR and PhD students conference Two days of study with 12 speakers selected through the present call. In these first two days of conference, papers from PGR, PhD or recently graduated students will be delivered. The sessions will be chaired by Professors affiliated to the Centro Studi sul Teatro Classico who will give an introduction and guide the discussion following the papers.

* 28th ‪Thursday- Friday 29th November‬‬‬‬ The Forgotten Theatre - main conference Two days of study with 14 speakers both selected through the present call and invited by the Centro Studi sul Teatro Classico; in this second part of the conference, papers from researchers and scholars will be delivered. The sessions will be organised according to the aforementioned methods.

Each paper presentation will last about 20 minutes, followed by 10 minutes of discussion. Candidates are kindly requested to follow these instructions meticulously, with due regard for the other speakers and organisers. The conference will be broadcast live on the Youtube channel of the Centro Studi sul Teatro Classico. In accordance with the best judgment of the Scientific Committee, the Proceedings of the Conference will be published by the Centre for Studies in Greek and Roman Theatre.

HOW TO PARTICIPATE - Those who wish to participate in the activities must submit the following to teatro.classico@unito.it no later than August 31, 2019:

* An abstract of the proposed papers, complete with a title. The document must not contain the author's name in any part and must have a maximum length of 300 words. The abstract can be written in Italian or in English;

* A brief curriculum vitae et studiorum (no more than one page) which highlights the affiliation of the speaker and their main publications. The official languages of the conference will be Italian and English.

The Scientific committee of the conference, chaired by Professor Francesco Carpanelli, will evaluate each paper received and will inform all candidates about the final program of the conference by September 2019.

ECONOMIC ASPECTS: In order to guarantee free and democratic access to knowledge and research, participation in the activities as speakers or as listeners will not entail the payment of any fee. All speakers and listeners will be guaranteed refreshments in between every activity session, as well as the provision of the necessary educational material (handout, stationery). Speakers will be guaranteed lunches for the duration of the whole conference. Unfortunately, due to the known economic hardships faced by the Italian University system, the organisation will not able to guarantee other forms of refund; exceptions can be made for particular cases (e.g. for speakers who cannot ask for reimbursement to their own institution or whose research is not funded). The organisation will provide details on the structures affiliated with the University of Turin that offer accommodations at reasonable prices.

SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE: Francesco CARPANELLI (Torino) coordinator Federica BESSONE, (Torino), Simone BETA (Siena), Francesco Paolo BIANCHI (Frei-burg), Adele Teresa COZZOLI (Roma Tre), Giorgio IERANÒ (Trento), Enrico V. MALTESE (Torino) Michele NAPOLITANO (Cassino e L.M.), Bernhard ZIMMERMANN (Freiburg).

CONTACTS: For any further information please do not hesitate to contact Luca Austa, conference organiser, sending an email to: teatro.classico@unito.it.

Deadline: 31st of August 2019

Call: http://www.teatroclassico.unito.it/it/content/convegno-%C2%AB-forgotten-theatre-2019%C2%BB

Program: http://www.teatroclassico.unito.it/it/content/convegno-%C2%AB-forgotten-theatre-2019%C2%BB

(CFP closed August 31, 2019)

 

 

ANNUAL MEETING OF POSTGRADUATES IN RECEPTION OF THE ANCIENT WORLD (AMPRAW)

AMPRAW 2019 - AUTHORITY AND LEGITIMACY

Radboud University, Nijmegen (The Netherlands): November 28-30, 2019

With great pleasure we announce our Call for Papers for this year's Annual Meeting for Postgraduates in the Reception of the Ancient World (AMPRAW).

AMPRAW is an annual conference that is designed to bring together early-career researchers in the field of classical reception studies, and will be held for the ninth consecutive year. It aims to contribute to the growth of an international network of PhDs working on classical reception(s), as well as to strengthen relationships between early career researchers and established academics.

AMPRAW 2019 will be held at Radboud University, Nijmegen (the Netherlands) from Thursday 28 to Saturday 30 November 2019, in collaboration with OIKOS (National Research School in Classical Studies), NKV (National Association for all interested in Classical Studies) and Brill Publishers. The programme includes two conference days, and an optional cultural excursion on the third day. It is organized by and for postgraduates and early career researchers working in all areas of classical reception. Thanks to generous contributions of our sponsors, there will be no conference fee. Besides that, we offer a limited number of travel bursaries to speakers without research budgets or with limited funding. Lunch and coffee breaks will be provided to all speakers.

Confirmed keynote speakers:
* Dr Justine McConnell (University College London, United Kingdom)
* Dr David Rijser (University of Groningen, the Netherlands)
* Dr Nathalie de Haan (Radboud University Nijmegen, the Netherlands)

The conference will further involve contributions by specialists from Radboud University and OIKOS.

This year's theme: Authority and Legitimacy.

Classical reception has always and invariably been linked to the concept of authority. The very idea of the 'classical' involves the establishment of an authoritative canon (or canons), which is renegotiated and recreated throughout time. Furthermore, aspects from the classical world, or what is perceived as such, have always functioned as authoritative examples in various cultural processes and narratives. Closely related to authority is the concept of legitimacy. Throughout history, classical antiquity has been quoted, excerpted, and framed to claim legitimacy. From the Franks under the Carolingians to the modern 'alt-right' movements, all claim legitimacy with reference to a certain idea of classical authority.

We invite papers of 20-25 minutes dealing in all possible ways with the following questions:

* What exactly constitutes the authority of Classical Antiquity?
* Where, when and why has it gained, or lost, its legitimacy?
* What are the structures behind the formation of an authoritative canon?
* How have people tried to maintain or subvert 'classical' authority: which social negotiations are at play?
* How do classical precedents function in historical and modern-day issues and mechanisms of power and legitimacy?
* How do classical examples function as anchors in new developments and innovation? In other words, how can new ideas obtain legitimacy by being anchored upon authoritative examples?
* How do the concepts of authority and legitimacy function in European and non-European reception of classical antiquity?

We encourage proposals in the fields of, but not limited to, archaeology, literary studies, linguistics, (art) history, media studies, religious studies, cultural sciences, history of law and political science, dealing with all time periods. The conference will be held in English.

If you would like to present a paper at AMPRAW 2019, please send an abstract of around 200 words to ampraw2019@ru.nl before May 20th 2019, together with a short biography stating your name, affiliation, and contact address. Please indicate in your submission whether you would like to apply for a travel bursary. Applicants will be selected and notified before the end of June.

For more information, visit: https://www.ru.nl/hlcs/conferences/ampraw-2019/ampraw-2019/.

(CFP closed May 20, 2019)

Previous AMPRAW conferences:
2018: University of Coimbra, Portugal: November 8-​10 2018. https://ampraw2018.wixsite.com/home/.
2017: University of Edinburgh: 23-24 November 2017 - https://ampraw.wixsite.com/ampraw2017. Twitter: @ampraw2017
2016: University of Oxford: 12-13 December 2016 - https://amprawoxford.wordpress.com/
2015: University of Nottingham: 14-15 December 2015 - ampraw2015.wordpress.com/ - Twitter: @AMPRAW2015
2014: University of London: 24-25 November 2014 - ampraw2014.wordpress.com/.
2013: University of Exeter.
2012: University of Birmingham.
2011: University College London.

 

 

THE BRITISH INSTITUTE OF PERSIAN STUDIES: DAY OF 'PERSIAN THINGS' - PERSIKA

Cardiff University, UK: November 27, 2019

Session 1 9.30-12.00: The Tower Building (70 Park Place) room 0.03
Session 2 1.00-6.00: The Tower Building (70 Park Place) room 0.01

9.30am Assemble for COFFEE
10.00am Jan Stronk (Amsterdam) - ‘The Greeks and Persia’.
10.40am Eran Almagor (Jerusalem) - ‘Notes on the Chronology of the Reign of Artaxerxes II’.
11.20am Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones (Cardiff) - ‘Dating the Book of Esther: Between the Achaemenids and the Hasmoneans’.
12.00 LUNCH
1.00pm Stephen Harrison (Swansea) - ‘Borders and the Limits of Universality in the Achaemenid and Seleucid Empires'.
1.40pm Melissa Benson (UCL) - ‘Violence in the Behistun Monument’.
2.20pm Mai Musee (Oxford) - ‘Myth and Reality: Persia in the Ancient Novel’.
3pm COFFEE
3.20pm Kirstin Droß-Krüpe (Kassel) - ‘Semiramis, Queen of Babylon, in Baroque Opera’.
4.00pm Julia Hartley (Warwick) - ‘Resuscitating the Achaemenids: Jane Dieulafoy’s Parysatis on the Page and on the Stage'.
4.45pm Keynote Speaker: Irene Madreiter (Innsbruck) – ‘Abduction into the seraglio: gendered notions of the ‘harem’ from Ctesias of Cnidus to Cristina de Belgiojoso and Lady Montagu’.
6.00pm Drinks & Dinner

For details contact: Professor Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones (Llewellyn-JonesL@cardiff.ac.uk) and Dr Eve MacDonald (MacDonaldG@Cardiff.ac.uk)

Website: https://www.bips.ac.uk/event/persika-a-day-of-persian-things/

 

 

ON TRANSLATING GREEK DRAMA IN EARLY MODERN EUROPE (ca. 1400-1600)

Maison Française d’Oxford, 2-10, Norham Rd, Oxford OX2 6SE: November 29, 2019

APGRD [Oxford], Université Grenoble Alpes and Université Paris 13

10.30-11.00 Registration and Coffee

11.00-11.15 Welcome from Fiona Macintosh and the organisers: Malika Bastin-Hammou (Grenoble), Giovanna Di Martino (Oxford) and Cécile Dudouyt (Paris 13)

11.15-12.15 – Theorising ‘Volgarizzamento’
Chair: Cécile Dudouyt (Paris 13)
Giovanna Di Martino (Oxford): ‘Vernacularisation’ as Translation Theory in Early Modern Italy
Giulia Fiore (Bologna): Ἑρμηνέων ἑρμηνῆς. On Vulgarizing Greek Tragedy in the Italian Cinquecento

12.15-12.30 Coffee Break

12.30-1.30 Theorising Imitation I
Chair: Fiona Macintosh (Oxford)
Cécile Dudouyt (Paris 13): The Theory and Practice of Imitation: translated fragments in Lapéruse’s Médée (1556), Le Loyer’s Néphélococugie (1579) and Garnier’s Troade (1579) and Antigone ou la piété (1580)
Angelica Vedelago (Padua): Translating Greek Tragedy in Sixteenth-century Europe: Between Imitation and Competition

1.30-2.30 Lunch

2.30-3.30 – Theorising Imitation II
Chair: Micha Lazarus (Cambridge)
Alexia Dedieu (Grenoble): Ut carminum rationem in hoc scriptore densissimis tenebris inuolutam clarissima luce donaretur. Faire la lumière sur la métrique: Willem Canter éditeur d’Euripide
Lucy Jackson (Durham): Greek Tragedy Translated ad spiritum - George Buchanan's Baptistes sive calumnia (1577) and Sophocles’ Antigone

3.30-3.45 Coffee Break

3.45-4.45 – Theorising Translation Practices
Chair: Stuart Gillespie (Glasgow)
Malika Bastin-Hammou (Grenoble): On translating Greek Comedy, c. 1440-1550
Thomas Baier (Würzburg): Why translations? Melanchthon and Camerarius on translating Greek Tragedy

4.45-5.30 Plenary led by Stuart Gillespie (Glasgow)

5.30-6.30 Drinks Reception and Theatre Workshop with Estelle Baudou (APGRD, Marie Curie Research Fellow) – Performing Early Modern Translation

Follow this link to register: https://translatinggreektr0.wixsite.com/mysite/registration

For more information, please email: giovanna.dimartino@classics.ox.ac.uk

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December 2019

HOMER SEMINAR X: HOMER AND THE EPIC TRADITION

Australian National University, Canberra: December 2-3, 2019

Sonia Pertsinidis and Elizabeth Minchin wish to draw attention to the tenth iteration of ANU’s Homer Seminar: Homer and the Epic Tradition. The dates for the Seminar are Monday 2 and Tuesday 3 December 2019.

The special guest is Dr Maureen Alden (Queen’s University, Belfast) and author of two important books on the Homeric epics: Homer Beside Himself: Para-narratives in the Iliad (OUP, 2000) and Para-Narratives in the Odyssey: Stories in the Frame (OUP, 2017).

They invite papers on all aspects of ancient epic, Greek and Roman, and its reception.

If you are interested in giving a paper, please contact Sonia (sonia.pertsinidis@anu.edu.au) or Elizabeth (elizabeth.minchin@anu.edu.au) before 30 September 2019. If you are interested in attending, please contact them before 31 October.

Call: https://www.facebook.com/anu.classics.ancient.history/posts/2326854917366097

(CFP closed September 30, 2019)

 

 

5TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE: A LITERATURA CLÁSSICA OU OS CLÁSSICOS NA LITERATURA: PRESENÇAS CLÁSSICAS NAS LITERATURAS DE LÍNGUA PORTUGUESA

School of Arts and Humanities of the University of Lisbon, Portugal: December 2-4, 2019

The Centre for Classical Studies at the School of Arts and Humanities of the University of Lisbon invites scholars interested in discussing and approaching ideas on thematic reconfiguration, values, cultural horizon and texts of Classical Antiquity (alongside characters, literary culture and poetics, Greek and Latin stories and fiction), regarding different settings in time and space in which literature is written in the Portuguese language to submit their conference abstracts until the 28th of July, 2019.

Conference abstracts must include:
- title of the presentation (clear and informative);
- abstract (up to 300 words);
- author’s name;
- affiliation;
- contact email address;
- brief academic curriculum (up to 300 words).

Contact email address for abstract submission and further information: literaturaclassica@letras.ulisboa.pt.

Registration: The registration fee for the conference is €100 (€70 for postgraduate students).

Scientific Committee:
Arnaldo do Espírito Santo
Cristina Pimentel
José Augusto Cardoso Bernardes
José Ribeiro Ferreira
Paolo Fedeli
Paula Morão
Sérgio Nazar David
Thomas Earle

Organizing Committee
Coordinators: Cristina Pimentel and Paula Morão
Alice Costa
Maria Luísa Resende
Ricardo Nobre
Rui Carlos Fonseca

Call: https://www.letras.ulisboa.pt/pt/agenda/cfp-v-coloquio-a-literatura-classica-ou-os-classicos-na-literatura-presencas-classicas-nas-literaturas-de-lingua-portuguesa

(CFP closed 28 July, 2019)

 

 

WORKSHOP: RAPE, REVENGE AND TRANSFORMATION: TEREUS THROUGH THE AGES

Faculty of Humanities, University of Roehampton, UK: December 7, 2019

Confirmed Speakers:
* Patrick Finglass (University of Bristol)
* Fiona McHardy (University of Roehampton)
* Lyndsay Coo (University of Bristol)
* Gesine Manuwald (UCL)
* Donatella Puliga (Università di Siena)

The story of Tereus preoccupied major authors in classical antiquity. References to it date back to the Homeric poems and the myth was addressed by renowned dramatists, such as Aeschylus, Sophocles and Accius, before being adapted by Ovid. These different versions raise questions about the reconstruction of the myth and representation of women, family violence, and taboos, such as rape and paidophagia. Aspects of the story reverberate in ancient material culture, especially Greek vase paintings, which also stem from different variants and traditions.

The aim of this conference is to bring together scholars from a variety of disciplines (Greek Literature; Latin Literature; Archaeology; Reception Studies) and to create a lively and challenging setting for discussion of new methodologies to reimagine the myth of Tereus. Although fragments are an emerging trend in Classical studies, this mythological focus will foster collaboration between Classicists taking innovative approaches to reconstructing and adapting the Tereus myth for audiences ancient and modern.

This conference will focus on the reconstruction, transmission and reception of Tereus in Greece and Rome by examining its different treatments in classical literature and art. As such, it will be of significant interest for researchers working on Greek and Roman tragedies, Ovid, classical reception and ancient material culture.

Submission Guidelines:

Papers may include but are not limited to:
1. Challenges to the received attribution, ordering, and textual arrangement of fragments
2. Innovative methodologies, or integration of different approaches, for reconstructing dramas
3. Quotation contexts
4. Productions of Tereus
5. Reception of fragmentary texts

Applicants are kindly invited to submit an abstract of no more than 250 words for a poster or a 10-minute presentation. We especially encourage postgraduate students to participate. Thanks to the generosity of the Classical Association, we are able to provide bursaries to cover the fees of the conference for the speakers.

Deadlines: Proposals should be sent to the organisers (TereusWorkshop2019@gmail.com) by 14 October 2019, 11:59pm. Selected applicants will be contacted by 1 November 2019.

The conference is made possible thanks to the generous support of ISC and the Classical Association.

Please do not hesitate to contact us with any queries at TereusWorkshop2019@gmail.com

The organisers: Alessandra Abbattista (independent scholar)
Chiara Blanco (University of Cambridge)
Maria Haley (University of Manchester)
Giacomo Savani (University College Dublin)

Call: https://classicalreception.org/event/rape-revenge-and-transformation-tereus-through-the-ages/

(CFP closed 14 October, 2019)

 

 

NEW CLASSICISTS CONFERENCE. THEME: COLLABORATION AND/OR NEW TECHNIQUES IN THE CLASSICS

King’s College London: December 7, 2019

We are pleased to announce the call for papers for our inaugural postgraduate conference series. The theme for this conference will be: Collaboration and/or New Techniques in the Classics.

Topics can be on any aspect of the Ancient World and must include, but are not limited to, at least one of the following:

* Departmental, interdisciplinary &/or interuniversity collaboration, where at least 1 PG student is the lead between members of staff or other student(s)
* New (interdisciplinary) cognitive &/or theoretical perspectives
* The use of new STEM techniques in Classics PG research, such as:
    - Agent-based modelling
    - Network theory & analysis
    - Database compilation, creation and dissemination
    - Critical theories, methods & practices in Digital Humanities
    - Environmental & lifespan analysis

Papers presented will be up to 25 minutes long, followed by 10 minutes of questions. Papers can be presented by more than 1 person, but the lead must be a postgraduate student. Papers presented will also be considered for inclusion into a special ‘Conference Edition’ of our journal, once the peer reviewing process has taken place.

Please submit your proposals/abstracts, up to 300 words, by Friday June 28, 2019 to: submissions@newclassicists.com.

(Edit 20/7/2019) Program:

0930 Welcome
0940 Guest Speaker: Dr Abigail Graham (ICS) - Title tbc
1020 Paul Kelly (KCL) - Risk and return in Roman Egypt
1055 Break
1110 Konstantin Schulz (HU Berlin) - CALLIDUS: A database of exercises for learning Latin
1145 Benjamin Wilck (HU Berlin) - Hidden messages in Greek mathematics: Results of a statistical analysis of linguistic regularities in Euclid's Elements
1230 Lunch & Poster Presentations
1340 Giulia Frigerio (Kent) - The impact of the laurel on Apolline divination: Affecting the mind without the use of drugs
1415 Noga Erez-Yodfat (Ben-Gurion) - Senses and the embodied mind of the mystes in ancient mystery cults
1450 Mark McCahill (Glasgow) - The ancient senses and Roman ritual: Considering imagines as memory objects in an interdisciplinary context
1525 Break
1540 Samuel Agbamu (KCL) - Classics and the Poverty of Philosophy
1615 Vivienne McGlashan (Bristol) - The Bacchants are silent: Applying cognitive approaches to explore ritual maenadism
1650 Nathalie Choubineh (Reading) - Kinetography: A methodological framework for reading kinetic motifs in the Greek vase-painting
1730 Drinks Reception

Free event. Book: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/new-classicists-conference-tickets-65027222172

For more information, please do not hesitate to contact us by visiting:
www.newclassicists.com
www.facebook.com/newclassicists
@NewClassicists

Call: https://www.newclassicists.com/conferences

(CFP closed June 28, 2019)

 

 

RECEPTION, PRODUCTION, EXCHANGE

Australasian Universities Languages & Literature Association (AULLA) and Australian Reception Network (ARN)

University of Wollongong, NSW, Australia: December 9-11, 2019

Texts live only by being read, yet in being read, they are also transformed. Texts may be read closely or distantly, critically or uncritically, deeply or hyperly, fast or slowly; for pleasure, profit, or piety; on the beach, in the library, or in the university classroom. Texts can have long afterlives, travelling far in time and space on circuits of communication and exchange. They can be given new life in new contexts of reception, interpretation, translation, or adaptation.

This conference examines the ways in which texts (both literary and otherwise) are produced, exchanged, and received. We encourage papers with a focus on engaged studies and discussions of teaching practice and of critical/exegetical responses to creative practice. Papers that respond to reception, production, and exchange in the fields of languages and translation studies; the literary study of languages other than English; and philosophical approaches to cultural expression, are expressly welcome. We also expressly welcome interdisciplinary angles on the theme, such as Cultural Studies, Indigenous Studies, Postcolonial Studies, ethnography, sociology of reading, History of the Book, studies in orality or performance, and comparative approaches.

Call for papers: the organisers welcome submissions for individual presentations of 20 minutes and panel sessions of 90 minutes.

Submissions received by Monday 29 April 2019 will be considered by the committee and outcomes will be announced by 13 May 2019, to enable funding applications to be made in good time. All submissions are due by Monday 30 September 2019, and the program will be published in early November.

Submissions should include: name/s of author/s (including affiliations), title of presentation, an abstract of up to 200 words, and a biographical note of up to 50 words per author. Panel submissions should also include a short description of the panel theme (up to 150 words), in addition to titles, abstracts, and biographical notes for all papers.

Submissions should be emailed to aulla-conference@uow.edu.au.

Hosts: This conference is hosted by the University of Wollongong, the Australasian Universities Languages & Literature Association Conference, incorporating the inaugural Australian Reception Network Lecture, and will be held in Wollongong, Australia from 9th-11th December 2019.

About AULLA: The Australasian Universities Language and Literature Association (AULLA) is an international academic organisation that advances research in all fields of language and literature, including linguistics, film studies, philosophy of literature, creative exegeses, poetics, and cultural studies, in the tertiary institutions of Australia, New Zealand and the Asia-Pacific. AULLA is affiliated with the International Federation for Modern Languages and Literatures (FILLM) and the International Federation of the Societies of Classical Studies (FIEC). It was founded in 1950 as the Australasian Universities Modern Language Association and assumed its present title in 1957.

AULLA’s mission is to promote cross-disciplinary connections and synergies and to encourage innovative research directions in language, literature and cultural studies. To facilitate this, AULLA holds a biennial congress, focussed on a specific theme, that brings together scholars from all disciplines associated with the study and teaching of language and literature.

The Journal of Literature, Language and Culture (JLLC; formerly AUMLA) is the association’s journal. It has an international focus and is fully peer-reviewed. AUMLA was published twice yearly from 1953-2012. JLLC will be published in three issues per year from 2013.

The Sussex-Samuel Prize for Postgraduate Students is offered by AULLA to encourage postgraduate student participation in the broader scholarly community. The prize is awarded every two years for a paper presented at the AULLA congress by a postgraduate student and judged by a panel within the Executive to be significant, innovative and accomplished. The applicant must be a currently enrolled postgraduate research student. The author of the winning paper will receive a prize of AUD$800, and the paper will be developed for publication in JLLC. For more information visit the conference website.

About ARN: The Australian Reception Network was founded in July 2018 and has more than 70 members working on all aspects of literary reception studies, history, and theory. Its website is www.australianreceptionnetwork.com.

Call: http://aulla.com.au/reception-production-exchange/

(CFP closed April 29, 2019)

 

 

TRUE WARRIORS? NEGOTIATING DISSENT IN THE INTELLECTUAL DEBATE (c. 1100 – 1700)

9th Lectio International Conference - Leuven, Belgium: December, 11-13, 2019

Dissent, polemics and rivalry have always been at the center of intellectual development. The scholarly Streitkultur was given a fresh impetus by the newly founded universities in the High Middle Ages and later turned into a quintessential part of early modern intellectual life. It was not only mirrored in various well-known intellectual debates and controversies – e.g. between Aristotelians and Augustinians, scholastics and humanists, Catholics and Protestants – but also embodied in numerous literary genres and non-literary modes of expression – e.g. disputationes, invectives, consilia, images, carnivalesque parades, music, etc. – and discursive or political strategies – patronage, networks and alliances. Moreover, the harsh debates notwithstanding, consensus was also actively searched for, both within particular disciplines and within society as a whole.

The aforementioned genres and strategies are all modes of negotiating dissent, which raises several important questions regarding these intellectual ‘warriors’. What were the most important issues at stake and how were they debated? Did the debates in the public sphere reflect the private opinions of the scholars involved? What access do we have to those private opinions? Can we approach such controversies in terms of authenticity and truthfulness, or consistency and coherence? Is there a contrast between ego-documents and the published part of an author’s oeuvre?

Starting from these questions, the aim of this conference is to study the polemical strategies and the modes of rivalry and alliance in scholarly debate from the twelfth through the seventeenth centuries.

Topics of interest may include, but are not limited to:

* the role of alliances and polemics in establishing intellectual networks;
* the presentation of rivaling views and the depiction of adversaries;
* the discrepancy or congruency between private and public persona;
* hitherto neglected disputes or new perspectives on well-known controversies;
* non-literary modes of negotiating dissent;
* the relation and connections between various literary and non-literary genres, also across different semiotic modes (literature, visual arts, performative arts, ...);
* the role of socio-cultural and economic background in polemics;
* the role of language (e.g.: vernacular vs. Latin);
* similarities and differences across disciplines (philosophy, civil and canon law, theology, medicine...) with regard to polemization and the negotiation of dissent.

We actively invite papers from a variety of perspectives and disciplines (civil and canon law, philosophy, theology and religious studies, literary studies, historiography, art history, etc.) and aim to study texts in Latin, Greek and the vernacular, as well as pictorial and performative traditions. We do not only welcome specific case studies, but also (strongly) encourage broader (meta)perspectives, e.g. of a diachronic or transdisciplinary nature. The conference will span the period from the twelfth until the seventeenth centuries.

The conference will be organized by the Leuven Centre for the Study of the Transmission of Texts and Ideas in Antiquity, the Middle Ages and the Renaissance (LECTIO). It follows upon last year’s conference on polemics, rivalry and networking in Greco-Roman Antiquity.

Confirmed keynote speakers:
Laura Beck Varela (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid)
Leen Spruit (Radboud Universiteit – Nijmegen)
Anita Traninger (Freie Universität – Berlin)

We invite submissions for paper proposals in English, French, German and Italian. Proposals should consist of a (provisional) title, an abstract of 300-400 words, and information concerning the applicant’s name, current position, academic affiliation, contact details and (if applicable) related publications on the topic. Applicants who intend to speak in French, German or Italian, are expected to include an English abstract as well. Accepted papers will be awarded a 30 minutes slot (20 minutes presentation, 10 minutes for discussion).

Please submit your proposal via email (lectio@kuleuven.be) by April 15, 2019. Applicants will be notified by email within 5 weeks from this date.

Successful applicants are expected to submit their paper for inclusion in a thematic volume to be published in the LECTIO series (Brepols Publishers). All submitted papers will be subject to a process of blind peer-review.

For any further queries, please mail to lectio@kuleuven.be.

Organizing committee: Guy Claessens, Wim Decock, Jeroen De Keyser, Fabio Della Schiava, Wouter Druwé, Wim François, Erika Gielen.

Contact: lectio@kuleuven.be

Call: https://www.kuleuven.be/lectio/conferences

(CFP ended April 15, 2019)

 

 

CARDINAL ALESSANDRO ALBANI: COLLECTING, DEALING, AND DIPLOMACY IN GRAND TOUR EUROPE / COLLEZIONISMO, DIPLOMAZIA ED IL MERCATO NELL’EUROPA DEL GRAND TOUR

British School at Rome / Centro di Studi sulla Cultura e l’Immagine di Roma: December 11–13, 2019

Organised by Clare Hornsby and Mario Bevilacqua

This conference aims to bring together an international range of art historians alongside scholars of related humanistic disciplines to open a new chapter on the multifaceted life and career of Cardinal Alessandro Albani (1692–1779), ‘The Father of the Grand Tour’. Albani operated in many different spheres of Roman society in a variety of roles: antiquarian, collector, art dealer, political agent, spy. It is time to make a reassessment of his life and of his activities.

There is a close connection between Britain and the study of Cardinal Albani, reflecting the central role that the British played in the art market in Rome, as entrepreneurs and purchasers. This subject—which casts valuable light on the political and diplomatic networks in mid-eighteenth-century Europe—needs to be revisited, particularly in the light of the many books, conferences, and exhibitions on collecting and the art market that have appeared in the last 25 years. It is appropriate that this conference should have as one of its venues the British School at Rome [BSR], which has, over this period, hosted many scholarly events connected with the Grand Tour.

For many years European scholars have examined aspects of the life of Cardinal Alessandro Albani, particularly in respect of his magnificent collections of ancient sculpture—of central importance in artistic and museological culture in Rome—as well as in the family archives and European correspondence. His relationship with major figures in eighteenth-century European art such as Winckelmann and Piranesi remains a fruitful area of study.

The second venue of the conference—the Centro di Studi sulla Cultura e l’Immagine di Roma [CSCIR—is an institution renowned for its commitment to a deeper understanding and reflection on Roman historical and artistic life. By this British and Italian collaboration we hope not only to build new networks of scholarship but to focus international attention on the Albani collections at a key moment.

The role of Alessandro Albani is key in eighteenth-century Rome, both as a patron of the arts and in the wider political life of the European courts. This conference is designed to be multi-disciplinary and international, reflecting the life and career of Albani himself. Proposals for talks might address the following themes:

Albani in the Grand Tour
The Roman art market
Albani and Vatican diplomacy
His correspondents and social networks
The Stuart court in Rome
Philipp von Stosch, Horace Mann, and spying
Albani the archaeologist
The drawings collection of Cassiano dal Pozzo and their sale to King George III
Winckelmann and Albani
Albani as taste-maker
The collections — sculpture, drawings, and the libraries
Albani and Piranesi
The Albani archives
Villa Albani

The languages of the conference are English and Italian, and the event will be open to the public. We invite doctoral students, postdoctoral researchers, established scholars, and members of the foreign academies in Rome to submit proposals for papers which will fall into two groups:

(1) 15-minute presentations on one event, object, or discrete theme
(2) 30-minute presentations on collections or connected themes

Please send an abstract of either 500 words (for a 15-minute talk) or 1000 words (for a 30-minute talk) with a 200-word CV to albaniconvegno@gmail.com by 1 April 2019.

We plan to publish a volume of essays based on this conference.

Scientific Committee: Mario Bevilacqua (Università degli Studi di Firenze, CSCIR), Amanda Claridge (Royal Holloway University of London, Cassiano del Pozzo project), Clare Hornsby (Research Fellow, BSR), Ian Jenkins (Dept. of Greek and Roman Antiquities, British Museum), Harriet O’Neill (Assistant Director, BSR), Susanna Pasquali (La Sapienza Roma), Jonny Yarker (Libson and Yarker Ltd., London)

Call: http://www.bsr.ac.uk/call-for-papers-cardinal-alessandro-albani-collecting-dealing-and-diplomacy-in-grand-tour-europe

(CFP closed April 1, 2019)

 

 

PAIXUE INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM - CLASSICISING LEARNING, PERFORMANCE AND POWER: EURASIAN PERSPECTIVES FROM ANTIQUITY TO EARLY MODERN PERIOD

University of Edinburgh: December 12-14, 2019

The symposium brings together scholars from across North America, Europe and Asia in order to explore how public performances of classicising learning (however defined in each culture) influenced and served imperial or state power in premodern political systems across Eurasia and North Africa. Aiming at encouraging scholarly exchanges among experts in different fields and cultures, the papers relate to the following three interconnected thematic strands: (a) Classicising learning and the social order, (b) Classicising learning and the political order, and (c) Classicising learning and the self.

Speakers: Robert Ashmore (Berkeley), Floris Bernard (Ghent), Mirko Canevaro (Edinburgh), Javier Cha (Seoul), Ming-kin Chu (Hong Kong), Christophe Erismann (Vienna), Michael Fuller (University of California, Irvine), Elena Gittleman (Bryn Mawr), Jaakko Hämeen-Anttila (Edinburgh), James Hankins (Harvard), Florian Hartmann (Aachen), Michael Hope (Yonsei), Pascal Hugon (Vienna), Takeshi Inomata (Arizona), Ashton Lazarus (Kyushu), Marina Loukaki (Athens), Christopher Nugent (Williams), Daphne Penna (Groningen), Alberto Rigolio (Durham), Asuka Sango (Carleton), Jonathan Skaff (Shippensburg), Luka Spoljarić (Zagreb), Ariel Stilerman (Stanford), Justin Stover (Edinburgh), Elizabeth Tyler (York), Lieve van Hoof (Ghent), Griet Vankeerberghen (McGill), Milan Vukašinović (ANAMED, Koç University), Elvira Wakelnig (Vienna), Stephen H. West (Berkeley), Julian Yolles (Odense)

The full programme and the list of abstracts are available in our website. Places are limited, so early registration is strongly recommended. Students can benefit from a reduced registration rate.

Website: http://paixue.shca.ed.ac.uk/

 

 

CLASSICS AND THE SPECTACULAR UNDER FASCISM: CLASSICAL PERFORMANCE IN THE 'VENTENNIO FASCISTA'

Ioannou Centre for Classical and Byzantine Studies, Oxford: December 16, 2019

The conference seeks to explore the reimaginings of classical antiquity in the artistic, media, and cultural expressions of Italian Fascism and para-fascist regimes in Europe from the inter-war period to the end of WW2. Whether in theatre, cinema, or mass events such as sports or political rallies, fascism used the symbolic power of classical traditions to produce large-scale spectacles. The deployment of technological means and of the performance medium in fascist events often resulted in a spectacularisation of antiquity which, to borrow Jeffrey Schnapp’s phrase, represents the ‘aesthetic overproduction’ that characterised Fascism’s Italian strain. Rather than the sublimation of the political into the aesthetic in the Benjaminian sense, the spectacularisation of the classical past played a key role in materialising the fascist political project of shaping a popular community.

Whilst analyses of fascism’s exploitation of Roman antiquity as well as of its more general politics of spectacle have flourished since the last decades of the twentieth century, a direct focus on the wide-ranging appropriation of Greek and Roman theatre is still missing. Thus, the conference will bring together international scholars, whose work has addressed fascism from the different perspectives of classics, theatre and performance studies, sociology and cultural history. It will predominantly focus on the reception of classics within artistic and cultural production, whilst also drawing links to classical philology, archaeology, and educational contexts. The aim is to view fascist culture within its historical dimension, following recent scholarly trends that underscore the importance of detailing the national traits of fascism, on the one hand, and defining its conceptual and constitutive elements on the other. This theoretical framework will also allow participants to reassess the mechanisms, which underlie performances of the classical past outside fascist contexts, both synchronically and diachronically.

The symposium will bring together international scholars whose work has addressed fascism from the different perspectives of classics and theatre and performance studies, sociology and cultural history. It is organised by Giovanna Di Martino (Oxford), Eleftheria Ioannidou (RUG), and Sara Troiani (Trento). It will be the first in a series of events on the theme on fascism, performance, and media (the second symposium will take place at the University of Groningen (Arts, Culture and Media, https://www.rug.nl/bachelors/arts-culture-and-media/). The main focus will be INDA (National Institute of Ancient Drama) and other classical performances in Fascist Italy.

Program:
10.15-10.45 Registration and Coffee
10.45-11.00 Welcome from Fiona Macintosh (Oxford)
Giovanna Di Martino and Sara Troiani present the APGRD and Laboratorio Dionysos Databases
11.00-12.00 Classicising the Spectacle – Chair: Oliver Taplin (Oxford)
Eleftheria Ioannidou (Groningen) - A Classical Modernity
Giovanna Di Martino (Oxford) – Aeschylus, Modernity and the New ‘Classical’ Ideal
12.00-13.00 Classics and the Spectacular I: Ettore Romagnoli, INDA and Fascism – Chair: Giorgio Ieranò (Trento)
Sara Troiani (Trento) – Ettore Romagnoli’s Productions and the Fascist Regime
Natalie Minioti (Thessaloniki) - The Secret Meaning of the Chorus in the Theatrical Performances of the Dramatic Festival of Syracuse During the Fascist Period
13:00-14.00 Lunch
14.00-15.00 Classics and the Spectacular II - INDA, Music and Dances – Chair: Fiona Macintosh (Oxford)
Giovanna Casali (Bologna) - Did the Music Change under the Fascist Regime? A Survey of the Musical Compositions in the INDA Performances
Giulia Bordignon (Venice) - ‘Living Sculpture’: The Dancing Chorus at the Greek Theatre in Syracuse, 1927-1939
15.00-15.15 Coffee break
15.15-16.15 Theorising Fascist Classicism – Chair: Eleftheria Ioannidou (Groningen)
Dimitris Plantzos (Athens) and Vasileios Balaskas (Malaga-Athens) - Reinventing Romanitas; Exchanges of Classical Antiquities as Symbolic Gifts Between Italy and Spain (1933-1943)
Helen Roche (Cambridge) - Theorising the Use and Abuse of the Classical Past in Mussolini’s Third Rome and Hitler’s Third Reich
16.15-17.15 Plenary led by Pantelis Michelakis
17.15-18.00 Drinks reception

Supported by APGRD; Faculty of Classics, Oxford; Laboratorio Dionysos, Università di Trento; University of Groningen

For more information: giovanna.dimartino@classics.ox.ac.uk

Register: https://classicsandspectac.wixsite.com/classicsandthespect/registration

 

 

TOKENS: THE ATHENIAN LEGACY TO THE MODERN WORLD

The British School at Athens: December 16-17, 2019

Keynote speakers: Quinn DuPont and John H. Kroll

Never before has an object of everyday life played such a powerful role in a multitude of circumstances: economics (Agorism, cryptocurrencies, tokenized credit and debit cards), governance (‘Agora’ networks applied in elections), and computing (data security via tokenization). This workshop aims to achieve a better understanding of tokens in ancient Athens as well as their modern-day applications in voting and market mechanics. Current theories and practices employ Athens and the city’s tokens as a historical paradigm. But what do we actually know about Athenian tokens? The workshop will focus on the following questions:

* What were the roles played by tokens in Athens? Did these roles evolve from the Classical to the Roman Imperial Period?
* Were tokens an ‘Athenian’ innovation? How did other Greek cities and states respond? What was the Roman ‘addition’ to Athenian tokens?
* What are the similarities between tokens then and now?
* How have tokens enabled and continue to enable anonymity and the operation of networks?
* How do tokens contribute to the formation of civic and political identity?
* How do tokens support legal and political equality?
* Can tokens stand for a master network of expertise? How do they become indispensable for the purposes of management and decision making?
* What rituals, behaviors and sentiments are related to tokens? Can tokens be regarded as a means of saving transaction costs?

The workshop invites contributions from across the humanities, informatics, finance and social sciences and welcomes discussion on any of the themes detailed above. Speakers may also bring their own themes or ideas. The workshop is designed as a forum of exchange in order to continue developing an interdisciplinary approach on the subject, already begun in two previous workshops (University of Warwick June 2017, British School at Rome October 2018), as part of the Token Communities in the Ancient Mediterranean Project.

Papers of 20 minutes duration are invited. Proposals including a title, name, e-mail address and an abstract of no more than 300 words should be emailed to Mairi Gkikaki, m.gkikaki@warwick.ac.uk by 1st May 2019. Notification of acceptance will be given by 1st June 2019. Travel subsidy will be possible. An edited volume of select papers arising from the conference is envisaged.

This workshop forms part of ‘Tokens and their Cultural biography in Athens from the Classical Age to the End of Antiquity’ project, a MARIE SKŁODOWSKA-CURIE action under the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No AMD-794080-2.

Website: https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/classics/research/dept_projects/tcam/events/athens

(CFP closed May 1, 2019)

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January 2020

[SCS PANEL] [LIGHTNING PAPERS] CLASSICS AND CIVIL ACTIVISM

Society for Classical Studies (SCS) 2020 Annual Meeting. Washington DC: January 2-5, 2020

Organizers: Yurie Hong (Gustavus Adolphus College), Marina Haworth (North Hennepin Community College), Amit Shilo (UC, Santa Barbara), T. H. M. Gellar-Goad (Wake Forest University)

Classicists at all levels have knowledge, experience, skills, and contacts that can usefully contribute to civic activism outside of academia proper. The Classics & Social Justice Affiliated Group has organized a workshop on the subject of Classics and Civic Activism for the upcoming AIA/SCS meeting. We invite proposals for a lightning round on outward-facing activism in which presenters will spend 3 minutes sharing their own experiences and making recommendations. These presentations will become integral to discussions among participants during the following breakout sessions.

The lightning round is the second of three parts of the workshop:

1) Three featured presenters from Indivisible, the National Humanities Alliance, and the American Federation of Teachers will offer guidance in community organizing, engaging with representatives, and other advocacy work, specifically focusing on how academics and educators can combine their skills and expertise with activism.

2) Lightning-round presentations will allow members to share their own experiences with civic engagement, presenting a broad spectrum of Classics-based activism.

3) Small-group discussion will allow time for participants to actively engage with the topics raised in the lightning round and share their own techniques and resources.

Potential lightning-round topics include, but are not limited to:

* using insights from the ancient world to advocate for social justice today
* engaging in political or community issue advocacy
* public-facing outreach projects
* advocating for educational policy
* organizing and unionizing at colleges and schools
* fostering inclusivity and accessibility in museums and historical sites
* letter-writing campaigns and citizen lobbying
* educating the public about ancient and modern democracy

Submit a 1-2 sentence proposal to be a lightning-round speaker by filling out this brief submission form https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSd1gaRC3BfaAmwri3UfKHYnKFI6OldlR8395x5xRTqaNUNo0Q/viewform no later than midnight September 15. The organizers are committed to ensuring diversity in topics and presenters, including presenters from all parts of the AIA/SCS membership: undergraduate and graduate students, retired members, teachers and professors, independent scholars, curators, editors, and more. We welcome submitters to comment on their own positionality in relation to their topic if they would like.

Due to limited time, not all potential speakers may be able to be accommodated during the lightning round, however there will be time during the following small-group discussion. Giving a lightning-round talk *does not* interfere with giving a paper or chairing a panel elsewhere on the program (per the SCS’ “single-appearance” policy).

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/scs-news/cfp-classics-and-civic-activism

(CFP closed September 15, 2019)

 

 

[SCS PANEL] EOS: BLACK CLASSICISM IN THE VISUAL ARTS

Society for Classical Studies (SCS) 2020 Annual Meeting. Washington DC: January 2-5, 2020

Eos is a scholarly society dedicated to Africana Receptions of Ancient Greece and Rome. For our next workshop at the annual meeting of the Society for Classical Studies (SCS) in Washington, DC (January 2-5, 2020), we invite abstracts for papers that trace and interpret visual responses to classical materials among people of African descent and relate them to the typically more text-based study of Black Classicisms.

In conceiving of this event, we have sought to combine several convergent strands of scholarly inquiry in the study of the Greek and Roman Classics. The discipline has long noted--and in the recent past increasingly sought to disrupt--the strict separation between the study of literary texts and of material objects, including works of visual art. At the same time, greater attention has been paid to previously marginalized voices, both ancient and modern. Finally and concurrently, Classical Reception Studies has moved closer to the center of the discipline’s attention, as growing numbers of classicists have recognized that one cannot help but look at the past from a perspective that is shaped by the needs of one’s present.

In the words of Romare Bearden, African American artist and creator (among many other works) of a series of collages and water colors entitled “Odysseus Suite”: “An artist is an art lover who finds that in all the art that he sees, something is missing: to put there what he feels is missing becomes the centre of his work.” To foreground these “missing” centers through discussions of visual engagements with classical materials is our workshop’s objective. We hope to deepen our understanding of the intellectual, emotional, and creative responses elicited by the ancient world in people of diverse backgrounds, and contributors therefore need not—and indeed: should not—restrict themselves to the classical “half” of these inter-medial dialogues. Rather, there should be an equal emphasis on the messages the relevant artists seek to send to their contemporaries, and/or on how Greco-Roman materials are combined with other artistic traditions of (e.g.) Africa, the Mediterranean, the Caribbean, etc. in the pursuit of artistic and creative expression. One exemplary study of such processes is Robert G. O’Meally’s 2007 examination of Bearden’s “Black Odyssey,” which reveals among other influences the impact that Jazz improvisation has had on Bearden’s art and how the very method of presentation (i.e., collages availing themselves of rich color palettes) informs the creation of meaning in his work.

Nor need the piece(s) of visual art that stand at the center of each paper necessarily provide the sole focus of discussion. An alternate direction is hinted at in Kwame Dawes’s and Matthew Shenoda’s 2017 collection of poetic responses to Bearden’s Odyssey. On this model, a paper could put classical materials in multi-directional conversation both with visual and with literary reactions. In fact, the presenters should not try too stringently to exclude themselves from the creation of meaning in the multimedial interchanges they uncover. Rather, they should feel free to pursue what Lorna Hardwick and Emily Greenwood have called “frail” or “fuzzy connections.” Any interpretation of a point of contact between different works of art ultimately emerges from the viewer’s or reader’s own mind, not always necessarily from the artist’s. Yet it can still provide insights into the mechanics underlying the ancient and modern materials in question. Another way to make sense of this dynamic is to understand the artist’s role in the process as an act of Signifyin(g). According to Henry Louis Gates’s 1986 exploration of this trope, allusivity in Africa and the African Diaspora tends to combine repetition with revision, even as it remains deliberately open to varied interpretations.

Topics to consider include the work of Romare Bearden himself, but there are many additional artists whose sculptures, paintings, drawings, architecture, etc. invite the attention of Classical Reception scholars. Examples include, but are in no way limited to, Lorraine O’Grady, Simone Leigh, or Jack Whitten.

Eos is committed to creating a congenial and collaborative forum for the infusion of new ideas into Classics, and hence welcomes abstracts that are exploratory in nature as well as abstracts of latter-stage research. Above all, we aim to create a supportive environment for scholars of all stages working on Africana Receptions of Greco-Roman antiquity.

Abstracts of no more than 400 words should be sent as an email attachment to cfp@eosafricana.org by Friday, March 1, 2019. The abstracts will be judged anonymously: please do not identify yourself in any way on the abstract page. All presenters must be members of the SCS.

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/2020/151/eos-black-classicism-visual-arts

(CFP closed March 1, 2019)

 

 

[SCS PANEL] HOMER IN THE RENAISSANCE

Society for Classical Studies (SCS) 2020 Annual Meeting. Washington DC: January 2-5, 2020

The Society for Early Modern Classical Reception (SEMCR) welcomes proposals for papers to be delivered at the 2020 meeting of the Society for Classical Studies in Washington, DC. For its fifth annual panel, SEMCR invites abstracts on the reception of Homer in all its manifestations in the early modern world.

The last fifteen years have seen an explosion in studies of the scholarly and creative reception of Homer in the Renaissance. Work by scholars including Marc Bizer, Tania Demetriou, Philip Ford, Filippomaria Pontani, and Jessica Wolfe--to name but a few--has illuminated the manuscript and print transmission of the Homeric texts and revealed the enormous range of contexts in which Homer was put to use and the immense variety of artistic, cultural, political, philosophical, and theological issues the Homeric poems were used to explore. Today it is possible to investigate questions in Homeric reception that would have been difficult to ask, let alone answer, fifteen years ago.

Proposals may address (but are not limited to) the transmission, translation, or book history of the Homeric texts; the commentary tradition; artistic, literary, or musical responses to Homer; political, philosophical, or scientific uses of Homer. We welcome the consideration of topics including the perspectives Homeric reception provides on Renaissance philology, knowledge of Greek or of oral composition, or the reconfiguration of literary or cultural histories; the discovery of Homer as a source of innovation or inspiration in a wide range of genres and media, or as an alternative to the authority of Latin poets or Roman culture; the geographical, political, or religious factors that influenced Homeric reception in different areas or communities, and the myriad uses to which the Homeric poems were put to explore those factors; the ways in which digital technologies might influence our understanding of Homer’s Renaissance reception.

We are committed to creating a congenial and collaborative forum for the infusion of new ideas into classics, and hence welcome abstracts that are exploratory in nature as well as abstracts of latter-stage research. Above all, we aim to show how the field of early modern classical reception can bear on a wide range of literary and cultural study, and to dispel the notion of an intimidating barrier to entry.

Abstracts of no more than 400 words, suitable for a 15-20 minute presentation, should be sent as an email attachment to ariane.schwartz@gmail.com. All persons who submit abstracts must be SCS members in good standing. The abstracts will be judged anonymously: please do not identify yourself in any way on the abstract page.

Proposals must be received by Friday, March 8, 2019.

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/2020/151/semcr-homer-renaissance

(CFP closed March 8, 2019)

 

 

[SCS PANEL] IMPERIAL VIRGIL

Society for Classical Studies (SCS) 2020 Annual Meeting. Washington DC: January 2-5, 2020

Whether one emphasizes his ambivalence or his applause, Virgil was unquestionably the poet of the nascent Roman empire. Like Homer, the Zeus of poets, Virgil was also the magisterial predecessor for all subsequent authors of pastoral, didactic, or epic. He was thus “imperial” in a double sense, as a commentator on the Roman world being transformed by Augustus and as a kind of poetic doppelgänger for the princeps himself.

This panel seeks to explore both aspects of Virgil and his legacy. Topics might include, without being limited to, Virgil’s response to the rise of Augustus and his role in shaping Roman response more broadly; how Virgil’s contemporaries or later authors used his imperial themes to mirror or to create a contrast with their own works and/or times; and the figure of Virgil himself in later literature, including late antique and early modern works.

Abstracts for papers should be submitted electronically as Word documents by March 1, 2019 to Julia Hejduk (Julia_Hejduk@baylor.edu), preferably with the subject heading “abstract_imperial_SCS2020”. The abstracts will be judged anonymously and so should not reveal the author’s name, but the email should provide name, abstract title, and affiliation. Abstracts should be 650 words or fewer and should follow the guidelines for individual abstracts (https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/guidelines-authors-abstracts), except that works cited should be put at the end of the document, not in a separate text box.

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/2020/151/imperial-virgil

(CFP closed March 1, 2019)

 

 

[SCS PANEL] NEO-LATIN IN THE OLD AND NEW WORLDS: CURRENT SCHOLARSHIP

Society for Classical Studies (SCS) 2020 Annual Meeting. Washington DC: January 2-5, 2020

Organized by Frederick J. Booth, Seton Hall University

The AANLS invites proposals for a panel of papers on current research on Neo-Latin texts from around the world to be held at the annual meeting of the Society for Classical Studies (SCS) in Washington, DC in early January 2020. We seek to highlight the variety and depth of Neo-Latin Studies; to underscore the importance of contemporary scholarship in the complex, global field of Neo-Latin literature; and to give scholars an opportunity to share the results of their research with colleagues in the many disciplines that comprise Neo-Latin studies. We welcome papers on all aspects of the study of literary, historical, scholarly, legal, scientific, and technical works written in Latin in the Renaissance and early Modern Period (to about 1800), as well as papers dealing with more recent Neo-Latin works.

Abstracts should be sent (and arrive no later than midnight EST on Saturday, February 23, 2019) to Dr. Frederick J. Booth at boothfre@shu.edu. Abstracts should be a maximum of 650 words (not including a brief bibliography). In accordance with SCS regulations, all abstracts for papers will be read anonymously by three referees. Please follow the instructions for the format of individual abstracts that appear on the SCS web site. In your cover letter or e-mail, please confirm that you are an SCS or AIA member in good standing (and please note your membership number), with dues paid through 2020.

https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/2020/151/aanls-2020

(CFP closed February 23, 2019)

 

 

[SCS PANEL] PROBLEMS IN PERFORMANCE: FAILURE AND CLASSICAL RECEPTION STUDIES

Society for Classical Studies (SCS) 2020 Annual Meeting. Washington DC: January 2-5, 2020

Organizer-Refereed Panel. Organized by Rosa Andújar and Daniel Orrells, King’s College London

Scholars who work on the modern performance and reception history of classical drama have often focused on the manner in which Greek and Roman plays successfully provide modern writers with a ready-made vocabulary for expressing painful and complex realities. This emphasis on the “success” of classical drama in the modern world could arguably be seen as a continuation of a long history of Euro- American philhellenism and idealization of the ancient world.

This panel aims to move away from what may be seen as a partial and skewed history of the performance and reception of Greek and Roman theatre in modernity, which focuses on positive case studies that celebrate the successful adaptation and application of ancient drama in diverse contexts. This panel instead proposes to explore a fuller and more nuanced history, focusing in particular on “failed” moments of classical theatre.

Possible areas of scrutiny include, but are not limited to:

* Invocations of Greek and Roman plays that were received with indifference or with lukewarm interest
* Modern performances of classical plays that “sort of” worked, or received negative receptions
* Moments of bewilderment and puzzlement in modern audiences, stemming from classical references, themes and motifs

In emphasizing scenes of “failed” reception and problems in performance in modernity, we seek to explore a larger question: how does an understanding of such an alternative performance history provide us with a fuller and different history of classical reception in modern theatre and more broadly, in the modern world? Through such an inquiry, this panel aims to unsettle the polarized state of Classical Reception Studies, in which classical texts are viewed on a binary system, as either agents of liberation or oppression. Rather than looking for more examples of how ancient theater has “successfully” administered the power to say the unsayable, we are especially eager for contributions that can help us think about performances which generated problems around conflicted subjectivity – about the awkward and difficult closeness between perpetrators and victims of political and sexual violence; about the complicities between the colonizer and the colonized.

Please send an anonymous abstract for a 20-minute paper as an email attachment to info@classicalstudies.org by February 8, 2019, listing the title of this panel as the subject line of the email. The text of the abstract should not mention the name of the author. Submissions should follow the SCS guidelines for individual abstracts and will be reviewed by the organizers, who will make final selections by the end of March.

Please address questions about the panel to the organizers: rosa.andujar@kcl.ac.uk and daniel.orrells@kcl.ac.uk

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/2020/151/problems-performance-failure-and-classical-reception-studies

(CFP closed February 8, 2019)

 

 

[SCS PANEL] SISTERS DOIN’ FOR THEMSELVES: WOMEN IN POWER IN THE ANCIENT WORLD AND THE ANCIENT IMAGINARY

Society for Classical Studies (SCS) 2020 Annual Meeting. Washington DC: January 2-5, 2020

A panel sponsored by the Women’s Classical Caucus for the 2020 annual meeting of the Society for Classical Studies in Washington, D.C.

Organized by Serena S. Witzke (Wesleyan University) and T. H. M. Gellar-Goad (Wake Forest University)

Among the most prominent anxieties expressed in sources from the ancient world are the fears of the wrath of the gods, of the destruction brought on by war, and of women in charge. Oppressed and controlled by the patriarchies of antiquity, women were not often allowed constitutional or legal roles in official affairs, but nevertheless found ways to exercise autonomy and accrue authority in the home, the community, and the state — and in some places and times, women wielded legitimate and public power.

This proposed panel will gather papers exploring both historical expressions of women’s authority and influence (both formal and informal) and the imagined incarnations of women’s power, as well as the intersections of gender, status, ethnos, ability, and power. Panelists might approach the issue through literature both historical and fictive, through art or architecture, through epigraphic evidence or papyri, and through archaeology or material culture. Potential topics include, but are not limited to, empresses and foreign queens; priestesses or philosophers; business proprietors and political campaigners; Hellenistic patronesses and local benefactors; the historiographical and literary figure of the dux femina; elegiac beloveds, hetairai, and meretrices; matronae and other powerful women heads of household; and the ways in which women in subsequent generations have used references to ancient women in power to support their own access to power.

Papers may address questions such as the following: what constitutes legitimate power? In what ways did women exercise influence and authority? What backlash did women face from these expressions of power? How did such women shape their societies and their worlds? What methods can we use to detect and understand women’s wielding of power in situations and contexts dominated by patriarchal oppression and silencing of women’s voices, actions, and experiences? How do status, ethnos, and ability interplay with gender in expressing power and in condemnations of those expressions?

Please send abstracts that follow the guidelines for individual abstracts (see the SCS website) by email to Ms. Julie Pechanek at pechanjn@wfu.edu by March 1, 2019. Ensure that the abstracts are anonymous. The organizers will review all submissions anonymously and inform submitters of their decision by the end of March 2019, with enough time that those not chosen can participate in the SCS’ individual abstract submission process.

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/2020/151/sisters-doin-themselves

(CFP closed March 1, 2019)

 

 

[SCS PANEL] THEATER OF DISPLACEMENT: ANCIENT TRAGEDY AND MODERN REFUGEES, IMMIGRANTS AND MIGRANTS

CAMP Panel, Society for Classical Studies (SCS) 2020 Annual Meeting. Washington DC: January 2-5, 2020

Organizers: Seth A. Jeppesen, BYU; Chiara Aliberti, BYU; Cecilia Peek, BYU

In Euripides’ Trojan Women, Hecuba and her fellow captives use a wide array of verbs for speaking and singing as they struggle to make their voices and stories heard in the face of repeated attempts by the men in the play to silence them and relegate them to the status of possessions rather than persons. Similar attempts to silence or disregard the plight of modern refugees and migrants are apparent all around us, from the newly energized nationalist movements in Europe to the tear gas canisters lobbed at women and children along the U.S.-Mexico border. As Nadia Murad has shown (The Last Girl, 2017), one of the most powerful ways of combatting this oppression is to open a dialogue and listen to the voices of those displaced by war as they tell us their stories. Bryan Doerries (The Theater of War, 2016) has shown how Greek tragedy can be used to initiate conversations regarding combat trauma, mass incarceration and end-of-life care and encourage recognition and healing for those involved. Luis Alfaro, in turn, has demonstrated in his recent play Mojada how well adaptations of Greek tragedy can address issues facing modern migrants and immigrants. Many Greek tragedies deal with displacement caused by war and characters who seek asylum from other cities and governments (e.g. Aeschylus’ Suppliants, Euripides’ Trojan Women, Hecuba, Andromache, Helen, Suppliant Women, etc.) There is much potential for scholarship and performance that uses Greek tragedy not only to elucidate the current refugee crisis but also to raise awareness and provide healing and understanding to communities. This panel invites papers that explore themes of cultural and physical displacement in Greek Tragedy and potentially draw connections between ancient literature and the current worldwide refugee/migrant crisis. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

* The language of displacement and/or silencing in Greek tragedy
* Greek tragedy and historical displacement in 5th century Greece
* The effects of war and violence in Greek tragedy
* Modern reception of Greek tragedy in the context of refugees, migrants, and immigrants
* Greek tragedy and public humanities projects that deal with issues facing refugees, migrants, and immigrants

Abstracts should follow the SCS guidelines for individual abstracts and can be sent by email to ksburns@uic.edu. Review of abstracts begins March 1, 2019. Abstracts received by March 15 will receive full consideration. Please ensure that the abstracts are anonymous. In accordance with SCS regulations, all abstracts for papers will be read anonymously by the panel organizers, who will serve as referees. Those selected for the panel will be informed by March 30.

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/2020/151/cfp-ancient-tragedy-and-modern-refugees-immigrants-and-migrants

(CFP closed March 15, 2019)

 

 

[SCS PANEL] WHAT'S NEW IN OVIDIAN STUDIES?

Society for Classical Studies (SCS) 2020 Annual Meeting. Washington DC: January 2-5, 2020

The International Ovidian Society, a newly formed organization and a new Affiliated Group of the SCS, seeks papers for its panel at the 2020 conference in Washington, D.C. Among the Society’s greatest purposes are to encourage future scholarship on Ovid, to support younger scholars and new work in Ovid, and to reach out beyond Classics to scholars in other fields, as well as to performers and artists, who do significant work related to Ovid and Ovidian reception.

The theme for our 2020 panel is “What’s New in Ovidian Studies?” With this panel, we hope to showcase new approaches to, and new topics in, the study of Ovidian poetry. We encourage all kinds of abstracts and we aim to provide a wide-ranging panel that looks to the future, providing both innovative topics and a broad spread overall of new directions for Ovidian studies.

Send questions to the co-organizers, Sharon James (sljames@unc.edu) and Alison Keith (akeith@chass.utoronto.ca).

Please send an abstract for a 20-minute paper as an email attachment to lfulkerson@fsu.edu by February 8, 2019, listing the title of this panel as the subject line of the email. The text of the abstract should not mention the name of the author, but the email message should provide name, abstract title, and affiliation. Abstracts must be 650 words or fewer and follow the SCS guidelines for individual abstracts (https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/guidelines-authors-abstracts), but should include works cited at the end of the document, not in a separate text box. Submissions will be reviewed by third-party referees, who will make final selections by the end of March.

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/2020/151/cfp-whats-new-ovidian-studies

(CFP closed February 8, 2019)

 

 

WRITING ANCIENT HISTORY IN THE INTERWAR PERIOD (1918-1939)

Newcastle University, UK: January 23-24, 2020

We are delighted to announce the international workshop "Writing Ancient History in the Interwar Period (1918-1939)” that will take place on 23 and 24 January 2020 at Newcastle University.

We aim to investigate the role played by the study of Ancient History (especially of Greece and Rome) in the construction of nationalist narratives in the interwar period (1918-1939). Between the two World Wars, Europe witnessed the propagation of nationalist narratives that heavily relied on idealised images of a distant past. Research in this area has largely focused on the myth of romanità in Fascist Italy and on the reception of Ancient Greece in Nazi Germany. However, scholars have devoted less attention to interpretations of ancient history in other national communities and to possible interactions between different and often competing narratives. By looking at the interactions between Ancient History and nationalism in different geographical areas, this workshop aims to explore the inter-relations of historiographical traditions on a global scale and their impact on political narratives.

The event has been generously funded by the School of History, Classics and Ancient History of Newcastle University, CRASIS (Interdisciplinary Research Institute on the Ancient World, University of Groningen) and Anchoring Innovation (research agenda of the National Research School in Classical Studies, the Netherlands).

Thursday 23rd January 2020
9.00 – 9.45: Registration and Introduction
9.45 – 11: Panel 1
Anna Kouremenos (Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen): Cementing a National Identity: Greece and its Past in the Interwar Period (1918-1939)
Federico Santangelo (Newcastle University): Augustus in Interwar Britain: the pre-Syme consensus
11 – 11.30: Coffee Break
11.30 – 12.45: Panel 2
Stefan Altekamp (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin): Villain and Victim. Punic Carthage in Interwar German History Discourse
Andrea Avalli (Università degli Studi di Genova/ Université de Picardie “Jules Verne”): Interwar Etruscology and Racism in Fascist Italy
12.45 – 14.30: Lunch Break
14.30 – 15.45: Panel 3
Sergey Karpyuk (Russian Academy of Sciences): The Foundation of the Soviet Journal of Ancient History ('Vestnik drevnei istorii') in 1937
Helen Roche (Durham University): Back to the Ancient Greek Future? Greek Antiquity as Paradigm in National Socialist Classical Education
15.45 – 16.15: Coffee Break
16.15 – 17.30: Panel 4
Nathalie de Haan (Radboud Universiteit): I nostri antenati. Ancient History, National History: the Italian case
Manuel Loff (Universidade do Porto): Grandeur, Empire, Race: Uses of the Past in Salazar’s Portugal (1930-1945)
17.30 – 18.30: Discussion
19.30: Conference Dinner

Friday 24th January 2020
9.30 – 11: Panel 5
Sarah Rey (Université de Valenciennes et du Hainaut-Cambrésis (UVHC) : Jérôme Carcopino, directeur de l’École française de Rome (1937-1940) : ses choix politiques et ses choix historiographiques
Ivan Olujić (University of Zagreb): Study of Ancient History in Croatia between the two World Wars
Antonio Duplá Ansuategui (Universidad del País Vasco): From Essentialism towards Professionalisation, and Landing in Ideology: Spanish Historiography on Ancient History in the Interwar Period
11 – 11.30: Coffee Break
11.30 – 13: Conclusions and discussion

The workshop will take place in rooms 2.49/2.50, Armstrong Building, Newcastle University (NE1 8Q8).

The online registration will be opening soon.

For any doubt or queries, please, email interwarworkshop@gmail.com

Nicolò Bettegazzi, PhD Student in Latin Language and Literature, Groningen University
Emilio Zucchetti, PhD Student in Classics and Ancient History, Newcastle University
Prof. Federico Santangelo, Professor of Ancient History, Newcastle University

Website: https://www.ru.nl/oikos/anchoring-innovation/events/agenda/workshop-writing-ancient-history-interwar-period/

 

 

CALGACUS IN 2020

UCL/KCL Symposium at Kings College London: January 25, 2020

To mark the septcentenary of the Declaration of Arbroath, recognising Scotland’s independence from England, Tom Mackenzie (UCL) and Edith Hall (KCL) will be convening a one-day symposium on Calgacus and his reception at UCL on Burns Night 2020 (25th January).

Offers of papers are requested (deadline July 19th 2019) to be sent to edith.hall@kcl.ac.uk.

Possible topics include the way Calgacus is presented in commentaries across the centuries on Tacitus’ Agricola, translations of his speech, the way it has informed anti-imperial or nationalist rhetoric subsequently, antiquarian and archaeological studies of the Battle of Mons Graupius, the presentation of Calgacus in the visual arts, fiction, drama, film and documentaries, his role in the Ossianic movement and Celtic revival and the journal Calgacus published by radical Gaelic-speaking poets in the 1970s.

Haggis (including vegetarian), neeps, single malt whisky and a reading of SCOTS WHA HAE promised. Bidh ùine mhath aig a h-uile duine!

Confirmed Speakers include: William Fitzgerald (KCL); Filomena Giannotti (University of Siena); Edith Hall (KCL); Tom Mackenzie (UCL); Alan Montgomery (independent scholar); Giuseppe Pezzini (St Andrews); Melanie Marshal (Oxford).

Registration: https://onlinestore.ucl.ac.uk/conferences-and-events/faculty-of-arts-humanities-c01/department-of-greek-and-latin-f13/f13-calgacus-in-2020

Call: https://www.facebook.com/groups/430896740266607/permalink/2421657764523818/

(CFP closed July 19, 2019)

 

 

AUSTRALASIAN SOCIETY FOR CLASSICAL STUDIES (ASCS) 41ST ANNUAL CONFERENCE

University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand: January 28-31, 2020

CFP: http://www.ascs.org.au/news/ascs41_call_for_papers.html - Deadline: July 31, 2019.

Conference website: TBA.

Program: TBA.

Enquiries: Daniel Osland: ASCS2020@otago.ac.nz

ASCS: http://www.ascs.org.au/

(CFP closed July 31, 2019)

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February 2020

[PANEL] IS THIS SPARTA? RECEPTION OF THE ANCIENT WORLD IN CONTEMPORARY MEDIA

108th College Art Association of America (CAA) Annual Conference, Chicago, USA: February 12-15, 2020

In early 2017, Berkeley, CA was witness to a series of demonstrations by right-wing protestors over the cancellation of a talk by Milo Yiannopoulous, some of whom incorporated Spartan-style armor into their outfits. Likewise, the Plutarch quotation "μολὼν λαβέ" has been adopted by the American Gun Rights community as a rallying call for Second Amendment defense. Scholars have increasingly recognized the power of contemporary reception to colour modern views of the ancient world. In this case, Zack Snyder's 2006 film 300 has become a cultural monolith that promotes a hyper-militaristic version of Sparta that is inconsistent with current scholarship. Gillen Kelly's and Bellaire Cowles' graphic novel Three is a notable step towards accuracy, along with Ubisoft's 2018 video game Assassin's Creed: Odyssey, yet both are indebted to the long train of reception that brought Snyder's film into being. With such dissonance between public and academic "fact," what, then, is Sparta?

This panel seeks to address how the reception of antiquity in modern media (broadly defined as visual arts and media post-1800) either counteracts or informs public opinion and knowledge. To that end we solicit proposals on how reception can spawn self-reinforcing narrative traditions, be leveraged in teaching, inspire public interest or, at worst, advance harmful and exclusionary modern agendas. We hope to spur discussion on how to incorporate this phenomenon in teaching, publication, and scholarship, and what our responsibility is as scholars to the larger public conversation. Proposals that feature inter- and multidisciplinary approaches are especially encouraged.

Chairs: Kira Jones - kkjone3@emory.edu and sburges@bu.eduSteven Matthew Burges, Boston University -

Call: https://caa.confex.com/caa/2020/webprogrampreliminary/Session5927.html

(CFP closed July 23, 2019)

 

 

LIVING LATIN AND GREEK IN NYC 2020: "NEGLECTED VOICES"

New York City, NY, USA: February 15-16, 2020

The Paideia Institute is pleased to welcome abstract submissions to the eighth iteration of Living Latin and Greek in New York City. This conference, which features papers delivered in Latin and Ancient Greek as well as small breakout sessions where participants practice speaking Ancient Greek and Latin under the guidance of expert instructors, will be held at Fordham University on February 15th and 16th, 2020.

The theme of this year’s conference is “Neglected Voices.” Which people or groups of people have been neglected, disregarded, or socially excluded throughout the history of Greco-Latinity? What do we know about them, and how do we know what we know? How does exploring their contributions help paint a fuller picture of the Ancient Greek- and Latin-speaking past?

We invite proposals for short talks in Ancient Greek or Latin on this theme with examples from Ancient Greek and Latin literature or material culture. In particular, we welcome proposals that amplify the voices of women, religious or ethnic minorities, slaves, non-elites, those who do not conform with regard to gender or sexuality, and other historically excluded groups. Outstanding submissions on other topics will also be considered, particularly (but not only) if they focus on classical language pedagogy.

Please use the link to send in an abstract of no more than 500 words: https://www.paideiainstitute.org/llinyc_abstract_submission. The deadline for submissions is September 15, 2019. Travel bursaries are available and can be requested through the same link. We encourage accepted speakers to apply for external funding as well since the number of travel bursaries is limited. All talks will be recorded, subtitled, and (with each speaker’s permission) published on Paideia's YouTube channel.

Call: https://www.paideiainstitute.org/llinyc_2020_call_for_papers

(CFP closed September 15, 2019)

 

 

[PANELS] CLASSICAL REPRESENTATIONS IN POPULAR CULTURE

Southwest Popular / American Culture Association (SWPACA) 41st Annual Conference, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA: February 19-22, 2020

Proposals for papers and panels are now being accepted for the 41st annual SWPACA conference. One of the nation's largest interdisciplinary academic conferences, SWPACA offers nearly 70 subject areas, each typically featuring multiple panels. For a full list of subject areas, area descriptions, and Area Chairs, please visit http://southwestpca.org/conference/call-for-papers/.

Classical Representations in Popular Culture

Papers on any aspect of Greek, Roman, or Mediterranean antiquity in contemporary or popular culture are eligible for consideration.

Classical Representations welcomes submissions on a broader range of topics including:

* Cinema directly or indirectly reflecting aspects of the ancient world in cinema: recent films involving Classical themes which you might consider include Game of Thrones, Stranger Things, The Legend of Hercules, Pompeii, Inside Llewyn Davis, the new Ben Hur, as well as television series which engage with classical themes like Doctor Who, Spartacus, Battlestar Galactica.
* Classical Motifs/Allusions/Parallels in Popular Music
* Dance, Ballet, Theater, the Visual Arts
* Children's Literature
* Graphic Novels and Cartoons
* Literary Theory/Postcolonial Theory/Reception Studies: Literary or theoretical analysis of literature employing classical references or motifs, like Anne Carson's Autobiography of Red, or Margaret Atwood's Penelopiad.
* Science Fiction/Fantasy: Analysis of representations of classical history, literature, or philosophy in science fiction movies or books, as Edward Gibbons to Asimov's Foundation Trilogy or the impact of Thucydides in Cold War cinema. Or, conversely, the influence of Science Fiction on representations of the ancient world in later cinema (e.g., how did George Lucas' empire of the Star Wars franchise influence later representations of the Roman Empire?)
* Pedagogy: applications of classics in popular culture: how can we use contemporary films or literature in the classroom?

This year, one panel of Classical Representations will be co-hosted by AIMS (Antiquity in Media Studies, "a new organization dedicated to promoting and supporting scholarship on the ancient world in modern media.") To submit to this panel, please type "Submission to AIMS Panel" at the top of your abstract. If not included in the AIMS panel, your paper will still be considered for inclusion in the regular panels.

All proposals must be submitted through the conference's database at http://register.southwestpca.org/southwestpca

For details on using the submission database and on the application process in general, please see the Proposal Submission FAQs and Tips page at http://southwestpca.org/conference/faqs-and-tips/

Individual proposals for 15-minute papers must include an abstract of approximately 200-500 words. Including a brief bio in the body of the proposal form is encouraged, but not required.

For information on how to submit a proposal for a roundtable or a multi-paper panel, please view the above FAQs and Tips page.

The deadline for submissions is October 31, 2019. As in past years, this may be extended at a later date.

SWPACA offers monetary awards for the best graduate student papers in a variety of categories. Submissions of accepted, full papers are due January 1, 2020. For more information, visit http://southwestpca.org/conference/graduate-student-awards/

Registration and travel information for the conference is available at http://southwestpca.org/conference/conference-registration-information/

In addition, please check out the organization's peer-reviewed, scholarly journal, Dialogue: The Interdisciplinary Journal of Popular Culture and Pedagogy, at http://journaldialogue.org/

If you have any questions about the Classical Representations in Popular Culture area, please contact its Area Chair, Benjamin S. Haller, Virginia Wesleyan University, bhaller@vwu.edu. Presenters from past years, please note that Virginia Wesleyan has recently changed from a College to our University: Ben Haller's Virginia Wesleyan old email posted on past CFPs will no longer work.

Southwest Popular / American Culture Association (SWPACA): http://www.southwestpca.org

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/scs-news/cfp-classical-representations-popular-culture-0

(CFP closed October 31, 2019)

 

 

WESTERN CIVILISATION IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY

University of Adelaide, South Australia: February 20-21, 2020

On 15 March 2019, a self-confessed white supremacist, now standing trial for terrorism and murder, is alleged to have walked into two Christchurch mosques and killed 51 people. The weapons and body armour employed in the attack contained the dates of several events in Crusading history; the manifesto of the alleged perpetrator placed his actions in an imaginary war of east-west, ongoing for a millennium. Ideas of ‘western civilisation’ implicitly situated against ‘other’ civilisations, or perhaps an absence of civilisation altogether, can be argued to have underpinned this attack. The concept of Western Civilisation, with various definitions, thus continues to be prominent in the public sphere. For some, such as the Ramsay Centre which promotes a degree in Western Civilisation, the idea continues to have social and political utility, reflecting a coherent body of knowledge, and their associated values, not least the ‘liberal’ tradition of western democracy. For others, this interpretation of European history can elide the almost continual global encounters and exchange of information that occurred, whilst denying the political uses of ‘western civilisation’ as a discourse of colonialism and imperialism.

This symposium provides a moment to reflect on the concept of Western Civilisation today, not just as a topic of historical interest but an idea that continues to hold a significant political function. What role do the histories that we write and teach play in the production of discourses of ‘western civilisation’ or resistance to it? What role do historians have in shaping ideas about the past in the present? And what responsibility do we have towards ‘western civilisation’ as a discourse? What is the future of ‘Western Civilisation’, both as taught in universities and in the public sphere?

Expressions of interest are now invited that speak to this theme from any discipline, time period or place, and any political perspective. We have a limited number of slots but are interested in proposals for 90-minute panels, roundtables or other creative contributions. We also welcome individual expressions of interest. We encourage submissions from Indigenous people, people of colour, queer people and members of other traditionally marginalised communities. Proposals are welcome from those at all career stages.

Please send expressions of interest to westernciv2020@gmail.com by 18 October 2019.

Call: https://westernciv2020.wordpress.com/

(CFP closed 18 October, 2019)

 

 

HISTORICAL FICTIONS RESEARCH CONFERENCE 2020

University of Salzburg, Austria: February 21-22, 2020

Theme: The Forms of History

Historical fictions can be understood as an expanded mode of historiography. Scholars in literary, visual, historical and museum/re-creation studies have long been interested in the construction of the fictive past, understanding it as a locus for ideological expression. However, this is a key moment for the study of historical fictions as critical recognition of these texts and their convergence with lines of theory is expanding into new areas such as the philosophy of history, narratology, popular literature, historical narratives of national and cultural identity, and cross-disciplinary approaches to narrative constructions of the past.

Historical fictions measure the gap between the pasts we are permitted to know and those we wish to know: the interaction of the meaning-making narrative drive with the narrative-resistant nature of the past. They constitute a powerful discursive system for the production of cognitive and ideological representations of identity, agency, and social function, and for the negotiation of conceptual relationships and charged tensions between the complexity of societies in time and the teleology of lived experience. The licences of fiction, especially in mass culture, define a space of thought in which the pursuit of narrative forms of meaning is permitted to slip the chains of sanctioned historical truths to explore the deep desires and dreams that lie beneath all constructions of the past.

We welcome paper proposals from Archaeology, Architecture, Literature, Media, Art History, Musicology, Reception Studies, Museum Studies, Recreation, Gaming, Transformative Works and others. We welcome paper proposals across historical periods, with ambitious, high-quality, inter-disciplinary approaches and new methodologies that will support research into larger trends and which will lead to more theoretically informed understandings of the mode across historical periods, cultures and languages.

We aim to create a disciplinary core, where researchers can engage in issues of philosophy and methodology and generate a collective discourse around historical fictions in a range of media and across period specialities.

Keynote speakers:
Dr Michael Brauer, University of Salzburg, “Cooking up Salzburg”
Prof Dr Gerhard Kubik and Dr Moya Aliya Malamusi, University of Vienna, “Works and Biographies of East and Central African Musicians”.

Send abstracts of no more than 250 words to: historicalfictionsresearch@gmail.com (5th September 2019; no pdfs, please).

Website: https://historicalfictionsresearch.org/hfrn-conference-2020/
Twitter: @HistoricalFic

(CFP closed Septmeber 5, 2019)

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March 2020

#CFP THE ANCIENT MEDITERRANEAN FOR MODERN AUDIENCES: RECEPTION, PEDAGOGY, ENTERTAINMENT

Ohio State University (OSU) Classics Graduate Student Colloquium

Ohio Union, Columbus, Ohio, USA: March 6-7, 2020

The aim of the OSU Classics Graduate Student Colloquium is to explore various directions in which the Ancient Mediterranean has been adapted and utilized by different cultures in Modern world from the Renaissance to the present day. In recent years, the online journal “Eidolon” and other public scholarship media have already successfully demonstrated how the cultures of the Ancient Mediterranean can be accessed, interpreted, and applied through various experiences by scholars, students, writers, and by the wider communities. We believe that the reception of Ancient Mediterranean cultures has become an important element of Classical scholarship and pedagogy. It is a critical point of contact between the academic community and the general audience.

The OSU Classics Graduate Student Colloquium invites papers on a range of topics that discuss and analyze the reception of the Ancient Mediterranean from a point of view of philology, linguistics, theater and performance studies, history, pedagogy, archaeology, art history, philosophy, anthropology, political studies, media studies, and/or gender studies. Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

* Reception of the Ancient Mediterranean in literary traditions of different countries, nations, and cultures
* Ancient Theatre on the modern stage
* Texts of the Ancient Mediterranean in translations
* The Ancient Mediterranean in visual culture
* Reception of the Ancient Mediterranean in new media: social networks and online communities
* Representation of the Ancient Mediterranean in video games
* Use of Ancient Mediterranean images in marketing
* Modern and post-modern philosophy and its use of Classics
* Classics in politics and propaganda
* Reception of Ancient Mediterranean cultures and its use in the classroom
* Classical pedagogy as the reception of Ancient Mediterranean cultures

We are excited to announce that Dr. Zara Torlone, Professor (Classics and Havighurst Center for Russian and Post-Soviet Studies, Miami University) will be presenting a keynote lecture entitled “Joy of Exile: Ovid and Russian Poets".

All submissions should include 1) an abstract not exceeding 300 words and 2) a brief CV or academic bio not exceeding one page. We ask that all submissions and inquiries be sent to: osuclassicscolloquium@gmail.com.

DATES:
Deadline for submissions: Monday, November 18th, 2019
Will notify all applicants: Monday, December 2nd, 2019
Colloquium: Friday, March 6th - Saturday, March 7th, 2020

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/scs-news/cfp-ancient-mediterranean-modern-audiences

 

 

[PANEL] RECEPTION STUDIES: STATE OF THE DISCIPLINE AND NEW DIRECTIONS

American Comparative Literature Association Annual Meeting, Chicago USA: March 19-22, 2020

Deadline for submissions: Current ACLA guidelines specify that each ACLA member may submit only ONE PAPER for consideration. Abstracts must be received by Monday, September 23, 2019 at 9 a.m. EST. Please submit your abstract via the ACLA portal. We have space for 8-12 papers (2 or 3-day seminar format of 4 papers per day).

Organizer: Michelle Zerba (mzerba@michellezerba.com)
Co-Organizer: Anastasia Bakogianni (a.bakogianni@massey.ac.nz)

Reception studies have made a significant impact on the field of literature and helped build new bridges for dialogue across historical periods and disciplines, including theater, film, and art history. This panel invites papers that reflect upon the theories and methodologies of reception studies and our interdisciplinary connections to fields such as comparative literature, adaptation studies, cultural studies, and media studies. We seek to investigate the current state of the discipline, to debate where its boundaries might lie, and to explore what kinds of cross-disciplinary dialogue lie ahead in this exciting and fruitful nexus of scholarly endeavor.

In particular, the panel seeks to address a series of key questions. What are the central concepts that guide inquiry in reception studies and related fields? What kinds of research have they enabled, and how has this research enriched the exploration of comparative literature, national literature, theater, and film in an age that sees itself as global? Are these concepts in need of critique, and if so, how? Why have certain disciplines like classics assumed a prominent place in reception studies? What concerns should reception, adaptation, and media studies be addressing?

The panel aims to interrogate the very processes of reception, and actively seeks to complicate the notion of a pure source text or point of origin, thus helping to dissolve hard boundaries between text, reception, tradition, and interpretive communities. Papers may engage with these questions theoretically and / or through an examination of texts. Possible topics include but are not limited to the role of the scholar or artist in the process of reception, the concept of juxtaposition, the uses of myth, the implications of orality, and the possibility of “masked” receptions where the nature of the connection between points of reference is unclear. We welcome papers that problematize the notion of a western canon and actively seek to push the geographical boundaries of reception as both a local and a global phenomenon.

Call: https://www.acla.org/reception-studies-state-discipline-and-new-directions

(CFP closed September 23, 2019)

 

 

#CFP LANDSCAPE AND IDENTITY: INTERDISCIPLINARY EXPLORATIONS OF BEING IN THE WORLD (PG & ECR WORKSHOP)

Durham University (UK): March 26-27, 2020

The interrelation between human identities and the landscapes and environments they inhabit is recognised in many disciplines throughout the Arts and Humanities and Social Sciences. With different disciplinary histories, backgrounds, research traditions, and paradigms, all these disciplines employ their own theories, approaches, and methods to study the link between landscapes, environments, and human identities across time and space. However, they all share common interests as well.

On the occasion of the establishment of Durham University’s interdisciplinary Landscape, Environment, and Identity Research Network, this workshop will provide a platform for cross-disciplinary conversations and collaborations aimed at the integration of different theories on, approaches to, and research methods for exploring the interrelations between landscape, environment, and identity. This workshop will offer an opportunity for PhD students and Early Career Researchers from a range of disciplines to come together and share their research on landscape and identity beyond their own discipline. We mean to investigate challenges to such interdisciplinary studies (e.g. due to different research traditions) and to discuss solutions to these issues. Our discussions are intended to form the basis of a collective output and to encourage future collaborations.

By bringing together researchers from various disciplinary backgrounds, including but not limited to Anthropology, Archaeology, Classics and Ancient History, Modern Languages, and Geography, we want to consider the following questions from a range of perspectives and disciplines:

* How are the terms landscape and identity used and problematised across disciplines, and what issues arise from these ideas? * How are different identities established through human interaction with
landscape or environment?
* What (combination of) methods and approaches may we employ to analyse and interpret this interrelation between identity, landscapes and environments, whether real or imagined, urban, industrial, or natural?
* How is human identity or sense of self affected when a landscape or environment changes, for instance due to war or conflict, political developments, natural disasters, tourism, climate change, etc.?
* How does this in turn affect their interactions and/or relations with other peoples?
* How can our academic research into different landscapes, environments and identities help address current issues in wider society, such as the dynamics between local and global identities, and our relation to a changing world that is subject to climate change?

We invite abstracts for 20-minute papers that address these questions from any perspective. Potential topics could include (but are not limited to): identity in relation to (changing) political, built and natural environments or landscapes; the shaping of the self and the environment; and the intersection between landscape, identity and topics such as memory, emotion, gender, and sensory experiences (e.g. sound, smell, or taste).

Following the workshop, we will seek to produce one or more collective outputs, both academic and non-academic, based on the contents of the papers. The exact form will depend on the ambitions and contributions of participants, but could include the following:
* An edited book
* A special issue of an interdisciplinary journal
* An online blog
* A piece for The Conversation

If you would like to join the discussion and present a paper at this workshop, please send an abstract of up to 250 words to landscape.identity.durham@gmail.com before 5pm (GMT) on Friday 15 November 2019. Thanks to a generous contribution from our sponsor, Durham University’s Institute of Advanced Study, there will be no conference fee. Lunch and refreshments will be provided. Applicants will be selected and notified by mid-December 2019.

For more information, please visit our website: https://landscapeidentitydurham.wordpress.com/ or email us at the above email address. You can also follow us on Twitter: @LandscapeDurham

NB. We are committed to making the event as inclusive as possible, so please do get in touch directly with the organisers via landscape.identity.durham@gmail.com if you have any enquiries regarding access, and for any further information.

The organisation team:
Esther Meijer, Classics and Ancient History,
Floor Huisman, Cambridge Archaeological Unit,
James Coxon, Anthropology,
Vicky J. Penn, English Studies,
Diego Astorga, Geography,
Christoph Doppelhofer, Geography

Call: https://landscapeidentitydurham.wordpress.com/

 

 

(A)SYNCHRONY: RECURRENCE, REVERSAL, AND RESISTANCE

Art & Archaeology Department, Princeton University, NJ: March 26-28, 2020

The Department of Art and Archaeology at Princeton University is thrilled to announce a three-day graduate symposium, “(A)Synchrony: Recurrence, Reversal, and Resistance,” which will be held Thursday, March 26 to Saturday, March 28, 2020.

Certain figures, forms, images, methods, and techniques recur in both cultural production and scholarly discourses, often leading to socio-political, historical, or cultural reversals and/or illuminating resistance and dissent. How might exploring these phenomena allow us to broaden our investigations in the histories of art and culture? How do they manifest themselves as synchronies or asynchronies, understood as harmonizations or dissonances of social and artistic production across time, space, and bodies? Answering these questions may help us create analytic frameworks not bound by regions or nation-states, but that stretch across the world, expose the social construction of temporalities, and challenge periodization and other forms of fixed categorization.

This conceptual framework may help address vital issues in current debates across particular subfields and disciplines, such as: how we can reimagine the concept of Nachleben productively for our increasingly global discipline; how literary or visual histories have been reused or repurposed to mitigate or rebel against external power structures and cultural paradigms; or how some modern and contemporary artists throughout various diasporas create collective memories by referring to the experiences of their ancestors in their work.

Princeton’s Art and Archaeology Graduate Symposium will explore the ways in which recurrence, reversals, and resistance serve as powerful tools in cultural production across disciplines through the conceptual frameworks of synchrony and asynchrony. Submissions from all disciplines are welcomed to engage with these issues by way of, but not limited to, the following broader themes:

* Cultural heritage used to underscore and legitimize a power shift;
* Support for or resistance to the empire demonstrated through the appropriation and modification of imperial imagery by those outside of the metropole;
* The fabrication of visual or material culture to envisage a desired or inaccessible past;
* The inheritance, construction, and questioning of workshop lineages;
* Repurposing “classical” or “traditional” imagery or inverting subject matter to destabilize geopolitical, social, and symbolic conventions;
* Usage of visual tropes as tools to explore and articulate individual identity and positionality;
* Revolutionary potentialities of retrospection for social and political critique;
* Re-enactments or critiques of prior exhibitions, objects, or performances

Please submit a working title, an abstract of no more than 300 words, and a two page CV in a single PDF to gradsymp@princeton.edu by Friday, November 1, 2019. Symposium presentations should be no more than twenty minutes in length. Accepted participants will be notified by January 1, 2020, and limited travel funds are available.

Deadline for abstracts: November 1st 2019 to gradsymp@princeton.edu

Call: [pdf] https://plas.princeton.edu/sites/plas/files/resource-links/princeton_aa_call_for_papers.pdf

(CFP closed November 1, 2019)

 

 

RES DIFFICILES: A CONFERENCE ON CHALLENGES AND PATHWAYS FOR ADDRESSING INEQUITY IN THE ANCIENT GREEK AND ROMAN WORLD

Campus of the University of Mary Washington (Fredericksburg, Virginia), HCC 136: March 27, 2020

Organizers: Hannah Çulik-Baird (Boston University) and Joseph Romero (University of Mary Washington)

One of the great benefits of the shift from a pedagogue-centered to a student-aware or student-centered classroom is that we listen more attentively to how our students experience the content of what we read. A decided strength of Classical Studies is the simultaneous proximity and distance—temporally, geographically, ideologically—of the ancient Greek and Roman world. That distance is felt more keenly when potentially difficult subjects (res difficiles) in our readings—domination, inequity, violence both sexual and otherwise—present themselves for inspection. Often the underlying source of the dissonance or disconnect is the distance in our perceptions of social justice.

In a conference held on the campus of the University of Mary Washington (Fredericksburg, Virginia), we examine the challenges presented by this curriculum with students who are increasingly more diverse in gender identity, race, ethnicity, income, family structure, and more. And while the society of our conference will examine pedagogical issues, we hope also to dilate outward to broader issues in education and society from (a) the current and future roles of Classics and the humanities in K-12 and higher education to (b) the ultimate goals of education.

Our keynote speaker will be Dani Bostick who teaches Latin in Winchester, VA, and who has garnered a national reputation as a writer, teacher, and advocate for victims of sexual violence. Learn more at danibostick.net.

We hope the conference will be attended by as many as possible in person, but a number (limited only by our subscription capacity), will be able to attend electronically.

Abstracts of 350 words should be sent electronically to Joseph Romero (jromero@umw.edu) by November 1, 2019.

Papers will be 30 minutes long with coordinated discussion at the end of each session. Any questions regarding abstract submission may be addressed to Professor Romero or Professor Çulik-Baird (culik@bu.edu). For more information see the conference website.

Website: https://cas.umw.edu/clpr/resdifficilesconference/

(CFP closed November 1, 2019)

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April 2020

[PANEL] CYCLICAL CLASSICAL: REBIRTHS, RENAISSANCES, AND REINVENTIONS OF ANTIQUITY

Association for Art History’s 46th Annual Conference

Newcastle University & Northumbria University, UK: 1-3 April, 2020

Session Convenors: Nicole Cochrane (University of Hull) N.C.Cochrane@2014.hull.ac.uk; Melissa Gustin (University of York) mlg519@york.ac.uk

If, as Aby Warburg said, ‘Every age has the renaissance of antiquity that it deserves’, what is the renaissance of antiquity that we deserve today? And how does that differ – if it does – from earlier renaissances and antiquities? Whether it be a 3D print of Aphrodite, Antinous as symbol of gay pride or the Photoshop of Donald Trump as Perseus triumphantly holding aloft a Gorgon-portrait of Hilary Clinton, in contemporary art, t-shirts, and the internet, the material remains of the classical world continue to permeate modern visual culture.

Following on from international exhibitions, internet discourse around the use of the antique, and recent texts by scholars such as Elizabeth Prettejohn and Caroline Vout among many others, we propose a session that engages seriously with the material remains of antiquity in art to explore the ways in which the art of the ancient world has been adapted, interpreted, and repurposed throughout history. By proposing an open time frame we hope to encourage a discussion on the dialogues formed between classical art and its receptions, questioning how issues such as gender, race, status and class, as well as political, environmental and historical factors, have impacted the use and reuse of the past. This panel will explore the constant rediscovery, reinvention, and reworking of antique material, methods, and models in different media, and invites papers from any period or medium that address questions of the ‘classical’, historic or present.

Submit a paper

Please email your paper proposals direct to the session convenors above, using the Paper Proposal Form.

You need to provide a title and abstract (250 words maximum) for a 25-minute paper (unless otherwise specified), your name and institutional affiliation (if any).

Please make sure the title is concise and reflects the contents of the paper because the title is what appears online, in social media and in the printed programme.

You should receive an acknowledgement receipt of your submission within two weeks from the session convenors.

Deadline for submissions: Monday 21 October 2019

Call: https://forarthistory.org.uk/our-work/conference/2020-annual-conference/cyclical-classical/

(CFP closed 21 October, 2019)

 

 

[RSA PANEL] ANTIQUARIAN NETWORKS IN 16TH CENTURY ROME AND THE BEGINNINGS OF ARCHAEOLOGY

Renaissance Society of America, Philadelphia, PA: April 2-4, 2020

Scholarly research in the humanities has long used a diversity of sources for the better understanding of its subjects. Information gathered from and about objects, persons, documents and ideas from professional networks were used to compare drawings and buildings, sculptures and inscriptions, texts and coins closely related to each other. In recent decades, this well-established methodology became regarded as an expression of Latour's "Actor Network Theory". Today, research exclusively based on "ANT" is however no longer limited to social or professional networks. This former narrow scope should and could be extended (again) and redefined to include Renaissance antiquarianism as a "network of networks", gathering information from all kinds of material and textual sources and combining them to reconstruct an initial or improved picture of ancient Roman past and culture. This three-panel session aims to bring together scholars from a wide range of fields, for example numismatics, epigraphy, art, archaeology, architecture, political, historical, religious and cultural studies (and their histories) as well as socially orientated historical network analysis. It is one of our aims to demonstrate how antiquarians combined information and created new interpretations of texts and artifacts to generate new knowledge. By exploring how they communicated their findings and developed new analytical methodologies, the session could help to investigate if and how to predate the beginnings of scholarly archaeology and scientific methodology from the 18th (cf. e.g. Alain Schnapp) to the 16th century. After all, antiquarian methodological approaches were very modern indeed and possibly even predated such a development in the natural sciences (cf. Rens Bod). In addition, antiquarian research networks were not only interested in the creation of scholarly knowledge out of mere curiosity. The purpose was to learn from antiquity as a source for practical solutions for contemporaneous and future problems — as was successfully achieved by Tolomei's «Accademia de lo Studio de l'Architettura» headed by Marcello Cervini.

The 3-part session will be organized by Drs. Andrea Gáldy (Munich/London; Seminar «Collecting and Display»), Damiano Acciarino (Toronto/Venice), and Bernd Kulawik (Zurich/Berlin; www.accademia-vitruviana.net).

Please send proposals of less than 300 words for a 20 min papers and a short cv until July 16, 2019, to Bernd Kulawik (be_kul@me.com).

Call: https://www.rsa.org/blogpost/1780396/326042/Antiquarian-Networks-in-16th-century-Rome-and-the-Beginnings-of-Archaeology

(CFP closed July 16, 2019)

 

 

[RSA PANEL] [SEMCR PANEL] CLASSICAL ORIGINS OF RENAISSANCE AESTHETICS

Renaissance Society of America, Philadelphia, PA: April 2-4, 2020

As an Associate Organization of the Renaissance Society of America, the Society for Early Modern Classical Reception (SEMCR) welcomes proposals for papers to be delivered at the 2020 meeting of the Renaissance Society of America in Philadelphia, PA. For one of its panels, SEMCR invites abstracts on the reception of classical theories of poetics and aesthetic experience in Renaissance art and music.

Plato's and Aristotle's theories of mimesis, Horace's Ars Poetica, and "Longinus"'s sublime have long dominated discussions of early modern aesthetics. Scholars have also sought to trace the influence of other, less explicitly didactic texts in defining the origin and value of art and the aesthetic experience in the Renaissance. Paul Barolsky, for example, has argued that Ovid's Metamorphoses lies at the heart of Renaissance aesthetics, whether in the story of Pygmalion bringing art to life or, conversely, Medusa's petrifaction of the living as competing metaphors for sculpture. Barolsky likewise sees Ovidian transformation behind Michelangelo's "non finito" and in the depiction of Botticelli's Chloris becoming Flora in the Primavera. Wendy Heller has explored the ways in which Monteverdi and Busenello's groundbreaking opera L'incoronazione di Poppea draws upon and challenges Tacitus' methods of historiography. More recently, Sarah Blake McHam has argued for the pervasive influence of Pliny's Natural History and its emphasis on life-like "naturalism" from Petrarch to Caravaggio and Poussin.

Building on these and other studies that move beyond questions of classical influence on the subject matter of Renaissance texts, this panel seeks papers that explore the strategies through which visual artists and musicians draw on classical aesthetics and the extent to which these hidden roots underlie Renaissance theory and practice.

The Society is committed to creating a congenial and collaborative forum for the infusion of new ideas into classics and early modern studies, and hence welcomes abstracts that are exploratory in nature as well as abstracts of latter-stage research.

Abstracts of no more than 150 words and a short CV of no more than 300 words should be sent as separate email attachments to caroline.stark@howard.edu (see the RSA's abstract guidelines and CV guidelines and models). The abstracts will be judged anonymously: please do not identify yourself in any way on the abstract page. Proposals must be received by August 1, 2019 extended deadline August 10, 2019.

Please include in the body of the email:
• your name, affiliation, email address
• your paper title (15-word maximum)
• relevant keywords

Call: https://www.rsa.org/blogpost/1780396/327928/Classical-Origins-of-Renaissance-Aesthetics

(CFP closed August 10, 2019)

 

 

[RSA PANEL] EXHAUSTED WITH ANTIQUITY: A SYMPTOM OF EARLY MODERN INVENTION

Renaissance Society of America, Philadelphia, PA: April 2-4, 2020

Where and when did early modern artists, architects, and writers begin to show signs of fatigue with the models of the classical past, and what kinds of creative experiments developed in response? Renaissance scholarship has long since moved beyond an understanding of its period as one defined first and foremost by a revival of antiquity. Although the significance of antiquarianism and classicism to manifold developments in early modern art and culture remains incontrovertible, both of those projects also met with productive resistance.

We invite papers addressing works of art or literature that reveal an exhaustion with antiquity and a conscious attempt to develop alternative modes, forms, and principles of invention. Especially welcome are proposals for papers that consider competing notions of the past, the distinction between ‘antique’ and ‘modern’, the political and cultural implications of the choice to forgo classical models, and the reasons why antiquity may have come to be perceived as an exhausted source in the context of certain moments and localities.

To submit a paper proposal please provide the following by email to Marisa Bass (marisa.bass@yale.edu) and Carolyn Yerkes (yerkes@princeton.edu) by 22 July 2019: – your name and institutional affiliation – paper title (15-word maximum) – abstract (150-word maximum) – keywords – curriculum vitae (up to 5 pages) – PhD completion date (past or future).

Call: https://www.rsa.org/blogpost/1780396/326084/Exhausted-with-Antiquity-A-Symptom-of-Early-Modern-Invention

(CFP closed July 22, 2019)

 

 

[RSA PANEL] [SEMCR PANEL] HOMER IN THE RENAISSANCE

Renaissance Society of America, Philadelphia, PA: April 2-4, 2020

As an Associate Organization of the Renaissance Society of America, the Society for Early Modern Classical Reception (SEMCR) invites proposals for papers to be delivered at the 2020 meeting of the Renaissance Society of America in Philadelphia, PA. For one of its panels, SEMCR invites abstracts on the reception of Homer in all its manifestations in the early modern world.

The last fifteen years have seen an explosion in studies of the scholarly and creative reception of Homer in the Renaissance. Work by scholars including Marc Bizer, Tania Demetriou, Philip Ford, Filippomaria Pontani, and Jessica Wolfe--to name but a few--has illuminated the manuscript and print transmission of the Homeric texts and revealed the enormous range of contexts in which Homer was put to use and the immense variety of artistic, cultural, political, philosophical, and theological issues the Homeric poems were used to explore. Today it is possible to investigate questions in Homeric reception that would have been difficult to ask, let alone answer, fifteen years ago.

Proposals may address (but are not limited to) the transmission, translation, or book history of the Homeric texts; the commentary tradition; artistic, literary, or musical responses to Homer; political, philosophical, or scientific uses of Homer. We welcome the consideration of topics including the perspectives Homeric reception provides on Renaissance philology, knowledge of Greek or of oral composition, or the reconfiguration of literary or cultural histories; the discovery of Homer as a source of innovation or inspiration in a wide range of genres and media, or as an alternative to the authority of Latin poets or Roman culture; the geographical, political, or religious factors that influenced Homeric reception in different areas or communities, and the myriad uses to which the Homeric poems were put to explore those factors; the ways in which digital technologies might influence our understanding of Homer's Renaissance reception.

The Society is committed to creating a congenial and collaborative forum for the infusion of new ideas into classics and early modern studies, and hence welcome abstracts that are exploratory in nature as well as abstracts of latter-stage research. Above all, we aim to show how the field of early modern classical reception can bear on a wide range of literary and cultural study, and to dispel the notion of an intimidating barrier to entry.

Abstracts of no more than 150 words and a short CV of no more than 300 words should be sent as an email attachment to caroline.stark@howard.edu (see the RSA's abstract guidelines). The abstracts will be judged anonymously: please do not identify yourself in any way on the abstract page. Proposals must be received by August 1, 2019 extended deadline August 10, 2019.

Please include in the body of the email:
• your name, affiliation, email address
• your paper title (15-word maximum)
• relevant keywords

Call: https://www.rsa.org/blogpost/1780396/327927/Homer-in-the-Renaissance

(CFP closed August 10, 2019)

 

 

[RSA PANEL] RENAISSANCE ECHOES: THE AFTERLIFE OF A MYTH

Renaissance Society of America, Philadelphia, PA: April 2-4, 2020

Among literatures, arts, philosophy, and psychology, the mythological figure of Narcissus has become a common topic of interest; quite the opposite can be said of Echo, the nymph sentenced by divine law to repeat fragments of another’s voice. Yet, in the original Ovidian myth, Echo plays a remarkable role that frames the whole Narcissus’ episode. This panel aims at exploring Echo’s mythological echoes in Renaissance literature, art, theater, and music from different perspectives:

Translations, receptions, reinterpretations of the Ovidian myth;
Echo voices in the pastoral genre;
Echo as rhetorical and musical device;
Echo as form of intertextual reference/literary allusions;
Echo as the embodiment of the lyrical subject or of the author’s voice.

We welcome proposals for 20-minute papers on (but not limited to) the above-mentioned topics. Please send abstracts with paper title (maximum 150-words-long), a short bio, your affiliation, keywords, and general discipline area to the organizers, Giulia Cardillo (cardilgx@jmu.edu) and Simona Lorenzini (simona.lorenzini@yale.edu) by July 31st, 2019.

Call: https://www.rsa.org/blogpost/1780396/323725/CfP-Renaissance-Echoes-the-Afterlife-of-a-Myth

(CFP closed July 31, 2019)

 

 

#CFP 2020 WARWICK NUMISMATIC DAY: THE WORLD IN YOUR HANDS. NEW DIRECTIONS IN NUMISMATIC RESEARCH.

University of Warwick, UK: April 3, 2020

Department of Classics and Ancient History Warwick, in conjunction with The Royal Numismatic Society.

Conference Organisers: Charlotte Mann and Clare Rowan

Plenary Speaker: Prof. Fleur Kemmers (Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main)

Coins, banknotes, tokens and other forms of money are often portable objects that can be held in the hand; indeed modern day medallic artists tell us that these objects are designed to be held in the hand. But although small and at times unassuming, these media carry and convey an extraordinary array of information; by holding a coin in your hand one might argue you are holding your world.

This conference explores what the unique contribution of numismatics is to our understanding of human society. Money, coinage, bank notes, tokens and medals across the ages have played political, cultural, religious, memorial, economic and social roles; often they provide a unique insight into particular communities, cultures and societies. A key focus of the conference will be exploring the intersection of numismatics, the study of money, with disciplines such as history, classics, art history, sociology, and economics. Papers on any topic related to the theme are welcome, but some key questions for the day include:

• What does numismatic imagery reveal about the exchange of cultural ideas and artistry between people?
• What does numismatic imagery reveal about the way societies negotiated their relationship with their ruling power?
• How does money contribute to identity and a sense of belonging?
• What do the location of coin finds reveal about the movement of people and their economic interactions?
• How do particular forms of payment media reflect social hierarchies, and how do social relationships reshape money?
• How is money used beyond the economic sphere within belief systems and rituals?
• How does money act as a type of media, storing and conveying information, as well as mediating human relations?

We invite abstracts of no more than 250 words from early career scholars (PhD students, postdoctoral researchers, assistant professors, early career heritage sector employees, etc) to be submitted to Charlotte Mann (C.Mann@warwick.ac.uk) by 29th November 2019. Due to the generosity of Warwick University's 'Connecting Cultures' GRP, we are able to offer modest bursaries to assist speakers with travel and accommodation costs.

The conference will be preceded by a workshop on 'Applying for German Funding' lead by Prof. Dr. Fleur Kemmers on Thursday 2/4/2020, which is also open to all attendees.

We are grateful to the Humanities Research Centre at the University of Warwick for their generous financial support.

Call: https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/classics/research/interests/numismatics/numismaticday/numismaticworld

 

 

COLLECTORS AND SCHOLARS. THE NUMISMATIC WORLD IN THE LONG 19TH CENTURY

University of Tübingen, Germany: April 16-17, 2020

In the 19th century, developments in the study and collection of coins set the cornerstone for modern numismatics: major steps included the foundation of learned societies (e.g. Royal Numismatic Society in 1836, Numismatische Gesellschaft zu Berlin in 1843, American Numismatic Society in 1858, etc.) and the publication numismatic journals from the 1830s onwards (Revue numismatique in 1836, Numismatic chronicle in 1838, Revue belge de numismatique in 1842, etc.) leading to a thriving numismatic community.

The 19th century is also the time when previously private (Royal) collections became public institutions (e.g. in Paris following the French revolution, or the Münzkabinett Winterthur in 1861), and when new museums were created (e.g. the Capitoline medagliere in 1873, Kunsthistorisches Museum Wien in 1891, etc.). Subsequently, museum curators began publishing scholarly catalogues of their collections, such as the British Museum's seminal catalogue series (e.g. Greek Coins from 1873 onwards, or Oriental Coins from 1875 onwards). Some of the works published in the 19th century were aimed at collectors, such as Théodore Mionnet's or Henry Cohen's reference works, but it is notably thanks to their publications that scholars were able to process coin finds as source for dating archaeological sites and discussing social history (e.g. Theodor Mommsen identifying Kalkriese as site for the battle of the Teutoburg Forest, as early as 1850, on the basis of numismatics).

At the same time, large and famous collections evolved, were traded, or finally bequeathed to museums leading to new research on the subject. Whilst earlier collectors were almost always generalists (coins being one collecting field among others such as antiquities, paintings, gems, etc.), collectors such as Hyman Montagu or Virgil Brand devoted themselves only to numismatics. These famous collectors were sometimes scholars themselves, writing noteworthy articles. The names of John Evans, Friedrich Imhoof-Blumer, William Henry Waddington, Archer Huntington and King Victor Emmanuel III are the most prominent examples of illustrious collectors with expertise and the desire to promote numismatic scholarship through their collections.

The 19th century is also the time when collectors started paying greater attention to the condition of a coin, and to their provenance, while the new medium of photography and improved book-illustrations allowed for the documentation and recognition of individual specimens in auction catalogues and scholarly works likewise. In the same spirit, numismatists themselves became focus of interest: medals and tokens were struck in their names, and books were written about them (e.g. Médailles et jetons des numismates in 1865).

We may also think of the institutional development of archaeology out of philology around the 1840ies to become a discipline of its own that triggered a shift in perceiving coins predominantly as material manifestations of the past. In addition, we need to take into consideration the large scale professional excavations of the century (e.g. the foundation of the Reichslimeskommission in Germany in 1892) that enabled new methods in studying coins from an academic perspective. Ultimately, this pathed the way for numismatics to become a university subject with the evolution of university coin collections. The 19th century was also a time that saw the growth of nationalism, which was accompanied by a focus on one's history as mirrored in the practice of collecting and trading coins. Questions may also include to what extend numismatics was received in the realm of contemporary art such as Eugène Delacroix's engravings, and literature - for example with the many coin references found in the work of Victor Hugo. These are some of the various new avenues and perspectives the symposium wishes to explore.

Our aim is to explore the numismatic world in the long 19th century - including both, the sphere of academia, and that of collecting and dealing - with a focus on ancient numismatics but also on medieval and modern numismatics, with an interest for the political, cultural, economic, and social changes of the era. Thus, a wide range of international experts, including numismatists, historians, archaeologists, anthropologists, and art historians are invited to present their research. Papers that explore specific case studies are particularly welcome, and talks on non-Western numismatics and on medals are hoped for.

Organizers: Stefan Krmnicek (Tübingen) & Hadrien Rambach (Brussels)

Abstracts of no longer than 500 words should be sent by email to: stefan.krmnicek@uni-tuebingen.de and coinadvisor@yahoo.co.uk.

Deadline for the submission of the abstracts is October 31, 2019.

For further information visit: https://uni-tuebingen.de/collectors-and-scholars

(CFP closed October 31, 2019)

 

 

CLASSICAL ASSOCIATION CONFERENCE 2020

Swansea University, Wales: 17–20 April, 2020

The Department of Classics, Ancient History and Egyptology at Swansea University will host the 2020 Classical Association Conference, to coincide with the University’s centenary celebrations. The conference will take place on the newly founded Bay Campus (opened in 2015), which is situated in an outstanding location, has direct access on to the beach, and its own seafront promenade. Accommodation will be arranged in hotels between Swansea’s city centre and the Bay Campus.

Swansea University’s Singleton Campus is home to the Egypt Centre, Wales’ largest museum of Egyptian antiquities. Swansea is situated close to the Gower peninsula, the UK’s first designated Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. There are castles, stately homes and Roman barracks in close proximity. There will be optional excursions to allow participants to explore the area.

Proposals for 20-minute papers, especially from coordinated panels, are invited. The University is committed to supporting and promoting equality and diversity in all of its practices and activities. We aim to establish an inclusive environment and particularly welcome proposals from diverse backgrounds. The closing date for abstracts is 31 August 2019.

Suggested themes include:
Ancient Narrative Literature
Ancient Political Thought
Archaeology of Graeco-Roman Egypt
Civil War Literature
Classics and the Future
Commentaries
Fragments
Global Classics
Metals and metallurgy
Patronage
Pedagogy and Outreach
Plato
Political Failure
Regionalism
Roman Philosophy and Satire
Rulers and rulership
The ancient reception of Augustan Poetry
The literature of poverty and disgust
The Welsh Classical Tradition

Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be sent to CA2020@swansea.ac.uk by the closing date. All other enquiries should also be directed to this e-mail address.

Call: https://listserv.liv.ac.uk/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind1905&L=CLASSICISTS&P=16032

Classical Association website: https://classicalassociation.org/

(CFP closed August 31, 2019)

 

 

SUSTAINING OBJECTS AND PLACES: ENGAGING WITH CULTURAL HERITAGE IN THE 21ST CENTURY

Durham University, UK: April 20-22, 2020

The title of this conference acknowledges the dual nature of our relationship with objects and sites. We sustain them in a number of ways that include, but are not limited to, how we conceive of and think about them, how we preserve and maintain them and how we fund them, but at the same time they sustain “us” by enabling identities to be asserted and maintained and by contributing to wellbeing. The conference title also asks the question whether the models and practices (economic, intellectual and technological) that have served us in the past continue to work in the 21st century. Over the past 50 years there has been a tremendous expansion in what we identify as cultural heritage as well as the number of museums and sites dedicated to preserving and exhibiting it. Additionally, stresses, such as climate change, rising number of tourists, population growth, as well as governmental and educational priorities in many countries raise questions about whether we can truly preserve everything of significance. For many conservators and heritage professionals, public engagement and “impact” have become key metrics in assessing both the feasibility and the success of projects. But this raises questions about how sustainable these efforts are. Are we really winning the hearts and minds of the public and impacting approaches to public funding or are we providing momentary diversions? Who benefits from engagement and how much? How do we assess whether the outcomes were truly successful or merely popular?

Emerging technologies such as digital preservation, predictive modelling and crowd funding offer new tools and new challenges for both planning and preservation. In a year that has seen vast sums of money pledged for the restoration of Notre Dame in Paris, before even an assessment of the damage or needs had been completed, and has also been marked by dissension about how and when the funds should be made available to that project and how funds are allocated to other preservation projects, it is important to consider how patronage may be shaped in the years ahead and whether traditional approaches to working must be changed to accommodate them.

We invite papers that critically analyze the economics of conserving and/or preserving cultural heritage, that examine whether outreach and “impact” do produce sustainable results and how we monitor and nurture those results. We also invite papers that deal with the role that any of the following topics play in sustaining objects:
· Marketing and funding
· Sustainability
· Advocacy and Outreach
· Interpretation
· Belief and Culture
· Wellness
· Climate change

Please submit abstracts of no more than 300 words to Dr. Emily Williams emily.a.williams@durham.ac.uk by 5pm December 15th 2019. Paper selection will be completed by Jan 15th and authors notified then.

Call: https://listserv.liv.ac.uk/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind1911&L=CLASSICISTS&P=38628

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May 2020

L’AMORE, LE ARMI, LE STELLE: BASINIO DA PARMA AND THE HUMANISTS AT SIGISMONDO MALATESTA’S COURT

Rimini, Italy (Museo della Città, Sala del Giudizio and Palazzo Buonadrata): May 14-16, 2020

By the middle of the fifteenth century Rimini had become a major center of Italian humanism. The cultural patronage of the famous condottiere Sigismondo Pandolfo Malatesta (1417–1468), attracted numerous artists, writers, and scholars, who came to the city and created works for which Rimini is still widely known today. In spite of recently intensified research on this topic, various questions about the philosophical, literary and artistic output of this circle remain open. In particular, the historiography of Rimini itself leaves considerable room for new exploration, and this despite recent work on the architecture and pictural arts of the quattrocento city. In the philosophical and literary sphere, for example, the Aristotelian-Platonic milieu around Sigismondo has not yet received in depth study, and Valturio’s imaginative tract De Re Militari still awaits a modern edition or commentary.

One of the authors who has received attention, and whose profile underlines the importance of the Renaissance in Rimini is the poet Basinio da Parma. Basinio was a prolific author in many literary genres: His mythological poem Meleagris provides a modernised version of the Calydonian pigsticking; his didactic poem Astronomica studies the stars and the zodiac; while the Liber Isottaeus is an epistolary novel in elegiac couplets about the love between Sigismondo and Isotta degli Atti.

An ongoing project at the Ludwig Boltzmann Institute of Neo-Latin Studies in Innsbruck (Austria), funded by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF), is currently working towards a digital edition of his epic poem Hesperis, along with with a commentary and English translation. This poem was Basinio’s masterpiece and can only be understood against the wider backdrop of humanism in fifteenth century Northern Italy, and Rimini in particular. Not only do considerable historical and biographical details appear in the poem, the piece also reflects and discusses the most important cultural and literary debates of its time: philosophy, philology and education, art history and architecture etc.

The conference L’amore, le armi, le stelle intends to contextualize Basinio’s works and those of other humanists and artists within a broader framework. We invite interested speakers to propose conference papers of approx. 30 minutes with a focus on one of the following suggested (by no means exclusive) topics:

* The historiography of the Malatestian court and its interaction with contemporary cultural dynamics, more specifically with Basinio;

* The literary culture of Rimini: inter- and intratextuality in Basinio’s oeuvre, its narrative strategies and links with the vernacular tradition;

* The sculptural and pictorial arts, architecture of the Renaissance city, and manuscript illuminations within the wider context of northern Italian scriptoria;

* Philosophical trends in Rimini and northern Italy;

* Greek influences and the reflection of knowledge of this language, especially in Basinio’s Hesperis;

* Intermediality in Basinio’s Hesperis as a reflection of Rimini’s artistic and architectural culture;

* The reception of Basinio in his time and later periods;

* ...

Key note speaker: John Monfasani (University at Albany, State University of New York)

Proposals (max. 250 words) are welcome before 4th November 2019.

Languages: English, Italian

Travel and hotel costs will be covered for all speakers.

We plan to publish the papers after the conference in a peer-reviewed volume.

For any questions contact:
Anna Chisena: anna.chisena@neolatin.lbg.ac.at
Simon Smets: simon.smets@neolatin.lbg.ac.at
Florian Schaffenrath: florian.schaffenrath@neolatin.lbg.ac.at

Call: https://neolatin.lbg.ac.at/upcoming-conferences/call-papers-lamore-le-armi-le-stelle-basinio-da-parma-and-humanists-sigismondo-malatestas-court

(CFP closed November 4, 2019)

 

 

FEMINISM & CLASSICS 2020: BODY/LANGUAGE

Winston-Salem, North Carolina (Wake Forest University Department of Classics and Department of Philosophy): May 21-24, 2020

FemClas 2020, the eighth quadrennial conference of its kind, takes place on May 21–24, 2020, in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, at the invitation of the Wake Forest University Department of Classics and Department of Philosophy. The conference theme is "body/language," broadly construed, and papers on all topics related to feminism, Classics, Philosophy, and related themes are welcome.

This conference focuses on the use of the body and/or language to gain, lose, contest, or express power and agency in the ancient Mediterranean world. Bodies and words, at both the physical and the conceptual levels, can exert disproportionate, oppositional, or complementary forces. Both have the power to transform their surrounding environments significantly. Yet there is a problematic dichotomy between body/physicality and language/reason, a problem long noted by philosophers, literary theorists, and social historians. FemClas 2020 seeks to contest, blur, and even eradicate these boundaries through papers, panels, and other programming that promotes interdisciplinary exploration of the ancient world.

We invite contributions that use the lens of bodies, languages, or their intersections to address any aspect of the ancient world, modern encounters with ancient cultures, or the academic practices of Classics, Philosophy, and related fields. Participants might explore how voices engender movement(s) and transform bodies, or how movement(s) in turn can stimulate recognition of unheard or otherwise suppressed voices and lead to change. These can be voices and movements within the ancient world, within the university, or within our modern disciplines. The study of agency, expressed through the problematic body/language dichotomy, addresses critical questions not only in scholarly work but also in the governance, makeup, and power dynamics of our fields, currently and historically. Now, perhaps more than ever, is a critical time for us to consider ourselves as students of bodies past and present, as embodied scholars, and to interrogate the repercussions of body normativity -- from race and gender to neurodiversity, dis/ability, and body types -- on our work and our profession.

All submissions are due September 1, 2019. FemClas 2020 welcomes individual papers, organized panels, workshops, roundtables, posters, author-meets-critic sessions, and other, innovative forms of programming. We encourage submissions from the widest possible range of perspectives, addressing all areas of the ancient world and its legacies. We also welcome proposals especially from related interest groups (such as Mountaintop, Eos Africana, the Asian and Asian American Classical Caucus, MRECC, Classics & Social Justice, the Lambda Classical Caucus, the Women's Classical Caucus, and EuGeSta) and from allied disciplines (e.g., English, comparative literature, media studies, environmental humanities, animal studies and Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies).

Proposals should aim for an abstract of approximately 300 words (not counting works cited), and should be anonymous where possible.

To submit a proposal for an individual paper or poster, visit: https://forms.gle/5hnCYHaCaMKREfrm8

To submit a proposal for any other type of session, visit: https://forms.gle/MDdu4DdqpPq82a8w5

We are enthusiastic about developing a program that will work toward making our intellectual community more welcoming and accessible to all. For this reason, we invite with special emphasis proposals for workshops, roundtables, and the like (creative formats welcome!) that will offer practical training about e.g. implicit bias, sexual harassment, racism, accessibility, developing diversity statements, and so forth.

The organizers (T. H. M. Gellar-Goad and Emily Austin) and the Program Committee of FemClas 2020 are committed to an inclusive, welcoming, and accommodating conference. Submissions from graduate students, contingent and underemployed faculty, and independent scholars are especially welcome. Submissions from undergraduate students are also welcome and will be considered separately for a dedicated panel. We will be able to provide reduced conference fees and some travel assistance for attendance by participants who cannot obtain institutional support.

As part of submission, registration, and attendance at the conference, we will ask you to agree to our conference Code of Conduct & Anti-Harassment Policy, which prohibits harassment and discrimination of any kind. A trained, experienced Anti-Harassment Administrator who is not a member of the discipline will receive and address or refer complaints about harassment and violations of the code of conduct. The Code of Conduct & Anti-Harassment Policy is available here: https://femclas2020.wordpress.com/code-of-conduct/

FemClas 2020 will take place partially on the downtown campus of Wake Forest University and partially at a nearby hotel. Each site is fully accessible for all forms of mobility. At each site there will be all-gender bathrooms, a lactation room, a quiet room, and on-site childcare (which we hope to offer at no extra cost).

Some states prohibit using state funds to travel to North Carolina, despite the partial repeal of NC HB-2. Wake Forest University, as a private institution, is not subject to NC state legislative regulations of public universities, and Wake Forest has a non-discrimination policy inclusive of sexual orientation and gender identity and expression: https://titleix.wfu.edu/nondiscrimination-statement/

Please contact T. H. M. Gellar-Goad at thmgg@wfu.edu with questions.

Website: http://femclas2020.wordpress.com

(CFP closed September 1, 2019)

 

 

MINISTERIUM SERMONIS: AN INTERNATIONAL COLLOQUIUM ON ST. AUGUSTINE’S SERMONS

KU Leuven, Belgium: 27-29 May 2020

On 27-29 May 2020, the research units History of Church and Theology and Literary Studies: Latin Literature of KU Leuven will organize, in collaboration with the C1-project Magnum opus et arduum: Towards a History of the Reception of Augustine’s De civitate Dei and the ERC-project Patristic Sermons in the Middle Ages: The Dissemination, Manipulation, and Interpretation of Late-Antique Sermons in the medieval Latin West, based at Radboud University Nijmegen, the fourth edition of Ministerium Sermonis.

This conference will bring together scholars who have recently made important contributions to the study of Augustine’s sermons. It is a sequel to the series of Ministerium Sermonis- conferences organised in Leuven-Turnhout (May 30-31, 2008), Rome (September 15-17, 2011) and Malta (April 08-10, 2015), the proceedings of which have been published in the series Instrumenta Patristica et Mediaevalia 53, 65 & 75 (Turnhout: Brepols 2009, 2012, 2017). The following survey offers some possible topics, but does not intend to exclude alternative issues or approaches:

(1) The transmission and reception of Augustine’s sermons
(2) Augustine’s argumentation (doctrine, exegesis and rhetoric)
(3) Political doctrine(s) and praxis in Latin Patristic sermons

Committed keynote speakers and respondents include: Isabelle Bochet, Johannes Brachtendorf, James Patout Burns, Gillian Clarke, Jérémy Delmulle, Max Diesenberger, François Dolbeau, Marie Pauliat, Els Rose, Clemens Weidmann.

If you would like to deliver a lecture during this conference, please send the provisional title, abstract (max. 500 words) and a concise CV (max. 500 words) before 31 May 2019, to Shari Boodts at s.boodts@let.ru.nl.

We will let you know whether your paper is included by 1 July 2019. All participants are kindly invited to announce the definitive title of their lecture and a short abstract before 31 December 2019. Lectures should be approx. 20 minutes long, followed by a general discussion of 10 minutes. The organizing committee has the intention of publishing the contributions to the conference as quickly as possible in the international series Instrumenta Patristica et Mediaevalia, published by Brepols Publishers.

The colloquium will take place in Leuven at the historical location of the Dutch College (Hollands College), where Cornelius Jansenius served as first president, and the historical Park Abbey, where Erasmus discovered Lorenzo Valla’s New Testament Notes. More practical information will follow when your abstract is accepted.

The full Call for Papers may be found here: https://shariboodts.weebly.com/news.html

(CFP closed May 31, 2019)

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June 2020

#CFP THE RECEPTION OF PLATO IN LATER ANTIQUITY AND THE MIDDLE AGES

University of Athens, Greece: June 8-9, 2020

We are delighted to announce a 2-day conference, organized by the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens in collaboration with the Australian Research Council and Macquarie University.

The conference will take place at the UNIVERSITY OF ATHENS, 8-9 JUNE 2020.

We have collaborated with the ISNS conference organisers so to facilitate the participation of local and international delegates to both events, but please note that the two events are run independently. News about our conference can be found on https://evanagno.wixsite.com/platoreception.

Our Approach: Taking start from our common interest in the Platonic tradition and its reception in later periods, our collaboration has to date yielded one edited volume (The Neoplatonists and their Heirs, Brill, 2020, ed. Ken Parry and E. Anagnostou-Laoutides), while a second one is anticipated to host select papers from the conference. We now wish to expand our network of co-thinkers and thus, we welcome papers on any aspect of Platonic reception, both in the Byzantine East and the Latin West, in philosophical, literary and/or theological texts.

Confirmed Speakers include (in alphabetical order):
-Prof Dirk Baltzly (University of Tasmania)
-Prof Kevin Corrigan (Emory University)
-Prof Lloyd Gerson (Toronto University)
-Prof Ilaria Ramelli (Durham University/ “Angelicum” University/ Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Milan)

Please, send abstracts of circa 300 words to the conference organisers by 15th DECEMBER 2019. Accepted speakers will be notified by 15th January 2020.

Our emails are: Eva Anagnostou-Laoutides (MQ) - Eva.Anagnostou-Laoutides@mq.edu.au; George Steiris (UoA) - G.Steiris@ppp.uoa.gr; George Arabatzis (UoA) - garabatz@ppp.uoa.gr.

Call: https://evanagno.wixsite.com/platoreception

 

 

#CFP TEACHING CONFLICT RESOLUTION FROM ANTIQUITY TO THE PRESENT

Manaus (Universidade do Estado do Amazonas), Brazil: June 9-12, 2020

Organisers: Dr. Martin Dinter (King’s College London), Dr. Carlos Renato Rosário de Jesus, Dra. Vanúbia Moncayo, and Dra. Maristela Silva (Universidade do Estado do Amazonas)

We welcome expressions of interest for 30-minute papers to be presented at this workshop, which will take place as part of the 3rd Semana Internacional de Estudos Clássicos do Amazonas (SECLAM); for information on previous iterations of this conference, see https://sites.google.com/prod/uea.edu.br/temas-classicos.

The theme of this workshop, which follows on from two previous events in Bogotá (April 2019) and London (July 2019), is ‘The Pedagogy of Conflict Resolution’. Hence, participants might choose to present accounts of existing projects integrating the Classics and conflict resolution outreach or develop plans for future programmes combining these subjects. Participants may also wish to explore how educators can mitigate the emotional impact of potentially sensitive classroom discussions on violence and war or even approach the workshop’s theme from an ancient history perspective by exploring how the ancients addressed subjects such as warfare and peacekeeping when educating youths. We also encourage speakers to examine how conflict resolution structures found in both ancient and modern literature might be practically implemented within Brazil and Colombia. Possible case studies include a region-specific reworking of Shay’s (1994) report, which compares post-traumatic stress disorder in Vietnam War veterans to Achilles’ emotional state in the Iliad.

The key questions to be answered during this exploration are: How can we, as educators, best implement Classics-related modules on conflict resolution for students at the secondary and tertiary level? What are the lessons to be learnt from initiatives – both successful and unsuccessful, and ancient as well as modern – which center upon introducing conflict-affected populations to the Classics? How can the knowledge accumulated throughout this project be used to improve the pedagogical materials which we have designed for use in schools?

Deadline for abstracts: 15th December 2019 to martin.dinter@kcl.ac.uk.

Contact Information: Please send all expressions of interest or queries to the Principal Investigator, Dr. Martin Dinter (martin.dinter@kcl.ac.uk). Please note that all participants will require proof of yellow fever vaccination in order to travel to Manaus.

Further information relating to this workshop series can be found online at our project site: https://sites.google.com/view/conflictandclassics/home.

Confirmed Speakers
Anni Marcelli Santos de Jesus, PUC-MG/UniNorte (Brazil)
Paula da Cunha Correa, Universidade de São Paulo (Brazil)
Marcos Martinho, Universidade de São Paulo (Brazil)
Gilson Charles dos Santos, Universidade de Brasília (Brazil)
Charlene Miotti, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora (Brazil)
Leni Ribeiro Leite, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo (Brazil)
Andrea Lozano Vásquez, Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá (Colombia)
Ana Filipa Patinha Prata, Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá (Colombia)
Gemma Bernadó Ferrer, Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá (Colombia)
Ronald Forero Álvarez, Universidad de La Sabana (Colombia)
Rodrigo Verano, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (Spain)
Kathryn Tempest, University of Roehampton (UK)
Rebecca Langlands, University of Exeter (UK)
Emma Buckley, St. Andrews (UK)
David Whetham, King’ College London (UK)
Astrid Khoo, Harvard University (USA)
Sara Monoson, Northwestern University (USA)

Project Summary: The AHRC Research Networking project ‘Conflict Resolution through Classical Literature’ forms connections between academic research in Classics and War Studies and peace-building education in two Latin American target countries: Brazil and Colombia. The project is characterized by its double aim of research and outreach.

In three workshops – Bogota (April 2019), London (July 2019), and Manaus (June 2020) –participating scholars will produce new research on how Classical literature communicates and showcases conflict resolution skills, and develop ways of employing Classical literature in communicating these skills to conflict-affected youth. In so doing, they will examine ancient models of conflict resolution and map these onto the current political situation in Colombia and Brazil. In addition, they will evaluate how the Classics have historically informed pedagogical initiatives in these countries and devise ways in which ancient literature can continue to enhance peace-related education.

Call: https://sites.google.com/view/conflictandclassics/call-for-papers-workshop-3

 

 

#CFP ISRAEL SOCIETY FOR THE PROMOTION OF CLASSICAL STUDIES - 49TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE

Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel: June 10-11, 2020

The Israel Society for the Promotion of Classical Studies is pleased to announce its 49th annual conference to be held at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev on Wed-Thurs, 10-11 JUNE 2020. Our keynote speaker in 2020 will be Professor Sheila Murnaghan, Alfred Reginald Allen Memorial Professor of Greek, University of Pennsylvania.

The conference is the annual meeting of the society. Papers are welcome on a wide range of classical subjects, including but not limited to history, philology, philosophy, literature, reception, papyrology, and archaeology of Greece and Rome,and neighboring lands. The time limit for each lecture is 20 minutes. The official languages of the conference are English and Hebrew.

Conference fee is $50. Accommodation at reduced prices will be available at local hotels. Registration forms with a list of prices will be sent to participants in due course.

All proposals should consist of a one page abstract (about 250-300 words). Proposals in Hebrew should also be accompanied by a one-page abstract in English to appear in the conference brochure.

Proposals, abstracts and other correspondence should be sent to Dr. Lisa Maurice, Secretary of the ISPCS, at lisa.maurice@biu.ac.il

All proposals should reach the secretary by 19th DECEMBER, 2019.

Decisions will be made after the organizing committee has duly considered all the proposals. If a decision is required prior to early February, please indicate this in your letter and we will try to accommodate your needs.

Call: https://listserv.liv.ac.uk/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind1907&L=CLASSICISTS&P=2484

 

 

#CFP TEACHING CLASSICS IN THE DIGITAL AGE

Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel (Germany): June 15-16, 2020

Currently, the various fields of Classics are facing the question of how digital media can contribute to teaching and communicating content and methods concerning the research of ancient societies at universities as well as to a broader public. The congress Teaching Classics in the Digital Age aims at presenting a status-quo of digital approaches in teaching and at sharing best-practice examples by bringing together different projects and practitioners from Classical Archaeology, Greek and Latin Studies and Ancient History. Furthermore, it aims at starting a discussion about principles, problems and the future of teaching Classics in the 21st century within and beyond its single fields.

We consider the following as key questions:
- How can digital methods and research approaches be implemented in teaching at university level?
- Which technical possibilities are suitable for digital teaching and how can they be used successfully?
- What are the limitations of and obstacles for applying digital teaching methods in Classics?
- How can digital methods help us to reach out to teachers and students at primary and secondary schools as well as to the broader public?
- How can digital methods contribute to the dissemination of Classics as part of a lifelong education?

The congress will comprise paper presentations and a session with posters and hands-on project presentations. At present, we are still welcoming proposals in the fields of Ancient History and Classical Archaeology and are particularly interested in collaborations between classicists and specialists in Digital Learning.

The congress Teaching Classics in the Digital Age will be organised as part of the Strategic Partnership “Ancient Cities” (ERASMUS+). The partnership is considering options to refund travel and accommodation costs for the participants. There will be no conference fee. The contributions will be published as part of an open-access conference proceedings.

Proposals for papers in English of 20 minutes and for posters/project presentations together with a short abstract of no more than 2000 characters and a short CV are welcomed by January 5th 2020.

Please submit by email to feuser@klassarch.uni-kiel.de.

Website: https://www.klassarch.uni-kiel.de/de/ancient-cities-creating-a-digital-learning-environment-on-cultural-heritage-2017-1-de01-ka203-003537/teaching-classics-in-the-digital-age

 

 

#CFP SYMPOSIUM CUMANUM 2020: GENERIC INTERPLAY IN AND AFTER VERGIL

Villa Vergiliana, Cuma, Italy: June 24–26, 2020

Co-directors: Brittney Szempruch (United States Air Force Academy) and John F. Miller (University of Virginia)

Although Vergil famously opens the Aeneid with a definitive statement of poetic intent—arma virumque cano—scholarship has long highlighted the poet’s propensity for the complication of firm generic boundaries. Amid a range of theoretical responses that have shaped the past nearly one hundred years (Kroll 1924; Cairns 1972; Fowler 1982; Conte 1986; Harrison 2007), the Vergilian corpus has emerged as some of the most productive ground for the in-depth study of generic flexibility (e.g. Nelis 2004; Seider 2016).

On its broadest level, this symposium aims to bring together scholars to discuss how the works of Vergil illuminate questions about genre and literary identity in the ancient world. In addition to looking at generic interplay in Vergil’s poetry, we seek to examine the role that genre has played in Vergil’s afterlife, both among his contemporaries and in later ages: how, particularly in relation to Vergil’s poems, did genre create or elide perceived boundaries and/or affiliations between authors in antiquity? What cultural implications did explicit or implicit generic interplay have? How has genre shaped not only our understanding of Vergil and what it meant to be an Augustan poet, but our reception (‘after’ in another sense) of the earlier genres with which he engaged? What do we gain and lose by putting Vergil at the forefront of this narrative?

Both textual studies and theoretical interventions are welcome. Papers might consider (but are not limited to) the following topics:

• ‘Greek’ vs. ‘Roman’ genres across Vergil’s poetry
• Vergil’s reception of Hellenistic generic theory and experimentation
• the presence of nonpoetic genres (scientific, philosophical, etc.) in the Vergilian corpus
• hymn, epigram, and tragedy in Vergil
• elegy and Vergilian pastoral
• ‘didactic’ and heroic epic
• the reception of Vergilian generic conventions
• the centrality of (and/or bias toward) Vergil in discussions of genre in antiquity

Speakers will include Giancarlo Abbamonte (Naples–Federico II), Alessandro Barchiesi (NYU), Sergio Casali (Rome–Tor Vergata), Stephen Harrison (Oxford), Julia Hejduk (Baylor), Alison Keith (Toronto), Giuseppe La Bua (Rome–Sapienza), James O’Hara (UNC Chapel Hill), Vassiliki Panoussi (William & Mary), Stefano Rebeggiani (USC), Fabio Stok (Rome–Tor Vergata), and Adriana Vazquez (UCLA).

Papers will be 20 minutes long with ample time for discussion. Participants will arrive on June 23 followed by three full days of papers, discussion, and visits to Vergilian sites.

Interested scholars should send an abstract of no more than 300 words to vergilandgenre2020@gmail.com by December 1, 2019.

For inquiries and further information, contact the directors: Brittney Szempruch (brittney.szempruch@usafa.edu); John Miller (jfm4j@virginia.edu)

Cited Works
Cairns, F. 1972. Generic Composition in Greek and Roman Poetry. Edinburgh.
Conte, G. B. 1986. The Rhetoric of Imitation: Genre and Poetic Memory in Virgil and Other Latin Poets. Cornell.
Fowler, A. 1982. Kinds of Literature: An Introduction to the Theory of Genres and Modes. Harvard.
Nelis, D. 2004. “From Didactic to Epic: Georgics 2.458–3.48.” In Latin Epic and Didactic Poetry: Genre, Tradition and Individuality, ed. M. Gale. Swansea: 73-107.
Harrison, S. J. 2007. Generic Enrichment in Vergil and Horace. Oxford.
Kroll, W. 1924. “Die Kreuzung der Gattungen.” Studien zum Verständnis der römischen Literatur: 202–24.
Seider, A. M. 2016. “Genre, Gallus, and Goats: Expanding the Limits of Pastoral in Eclogues 6 and 10.” Vergilius 62: 3–23.

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/scs-news/cfp-generic-interplay-and-after-vergil

 

 

#CFP WRITING ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL SAME-SEX DESIRE: GOALS, METHODS, CHALLENGES

Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand: June 30-July 2, 2020

For several decades now, scholars have devoted attention to same-sex desire in both ancient times and the centuries that followed. Not surprisingly, there have been vigorous debates over how to go about it. These debates have been framed in various ways. Here are some examples:

* essentialism VERSUS constructivism;
* Foucauldian discourse analysis VERSUS approaches inspired by psychoanalysis;
* (the impossibility of) objective history VERSUS (overly) subjective history;
* perception of commonalities across time VERSUS rigorously historicizing insistence on the past's alterity;
* positivism VERSUS imaginative reconstruction of contemporaneous receptions.

These dichotomies, which are both reductive and don't exhaust the possibilities, continue to crackle with contention. They also continue to undergird and even disturb current scholarly endeavours.

We are looking for papers (30 minutes in length) in which scholars not only speak about primary source material but also reflect explicitly on the theoretical orientation of their work (see the dichotomies above for examples) and the purpose(s) of (their) scholarship on same-sex desire. An additional objective of this conference will be an edited volume of papers that will aim to showcase a variety of approaches to this important topic.

Please send proposals (c. 500 words) to Mark Masterson writingsamesexdesire@gmail.com by 1 December 2019. If you have any questions, please send them to him at this address also.

In your proposal include:
1) the primary source material/historical milieu to be discussed, and
2) the general theoretical basis of the work

Call: https://cms.victoria.ac.nz/slc/about/events/writing-ancient-and-medieval-same-sex-desire-goals,-methods,-challenges/call-for-papers

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July 2020

#CFP PACIFIC RIM ROMAN LITERATURE SEMINAR 34: IMAGES OF EARLY ROME

Boston University, Massachusetts, USA: July 10-12, 2020

The thirty-fourth meeting of the PacRim Roman Literature Seminar will be held at Boston University from 10 to 12 July 2020. The theme for the 2020 conference will be “Images of Early Rome in Latin Literature.”

Papers are invited to explore different depictions of the figures of early Rome in Latin literature; Aeneas, Ilia, Romulus and Remus, the Sabine Women, Lucretia, etc. How do the iterations of these figures reflect (or problematize) political and literary attitudes in Rome? And what does the continued presence of these early figures in the works of successive literary generations tell us about the enduring nature of these Roman “myths”? We also invite papers on the reception of early Rome in any medium, from Shakespeare’s The Rape of Lucrece (1594), to Ursula K. Le Guin’s Lavinia (2008), to Matteo Rovere’s Il Primo Re (2019).

Papers should be 30 minutes in length (with fifteen minutes of discussion time). The Pacific Rim Seminar does not run parallel sessions; participants can attend any or all papers. Abstract proposals of 200-300 words, and queries about the conference, should be sent to the organizer, Hannah Čulík-Baird, at culik@bu.edu. Submissions from graduate students and early-career researchers are welcome. Please have abstracts submitted by 15th January 2020 (earlier submissions welcome).

Call: https://pacrim34.wordpress.com

 

 

#CFP [PANELS] CELTIC CONFERENCE IN CLASSICS 2020

Lyon, France (Universities of Lyon/École normale supérieure de Lyon): July 15-18, 2020

The Celtic Conference in Classics (CCC) is pleased to announce that its 13th conference, hosted by the universities of Lyon and by the École normale supérieure de Lyon, will take place in Lyon, France, 15-18 July (Wed.-Sat.), 2020.

As always, participation is invited from all countries of the world. Suggestions are now invited from colleagues wishing to convene a panel for the event at Lyon. The languages of the conference are English and French.

Panels typically consist of between 12 and 18 speakers. Themes and speakers proposed are then discussed, and a selection made, by the Conference's organisers. For this iteration of the CCC, we shall be looking especially for panels which expect to include speakers from French-speaking campuses. Proposals should be sent to all five organisers (at the email addresses below) by 1 December.

(Lyon)
Nicolas Richer (nicolas.richer@ens-lyon.fr)
Claire Fauchon Claudon (claire.fauchon@ens-lyon.fr)

(CCC)
Anton Powell (powellanton@btopenworld.com)
Douglas Cairns (douglas.cairns@ed.ac.uk)
Nancy Bouidghaghen (nancy.bouidghaghen@googlemail.com)

General details about the CCC, its history, purposes, and ethos, can be found on our permanent website: http://www.celticconferenceinclassics.org/.

 

 

#CFP THE MARY RENAULT PRIZE

Applications close: July annually.

The deadline for the 2020 Mary Renault Prize competition is: TBA.

The Mary Renault Prize is a Classical Reception essay prize for school or college sixth form pupils, awarded by the Principal and Fellows of St Hugh’s College, and funded by the royalties from Mary Renault’s novels.

The Principal and Fellows of St Hugh’s College offer two or more Prizes, worth up to £300 each, for essays on classical reception or influence submitted by pupils who, at the closing date, have been in the Sixth Form of any school or college for a period of not more than two years. The prizes are in memory of the author Mary Renault, who is best known for her historical novels set in ancient Greece, recently reissued by Virago. Renault read English at St Hugh’s in the 1920s and subsequently taught herself ancient Greek. Her novels have inspired many thousands of readers to pursue the study of Classics at University level and beyond. At least one prize will be awarded a pupil who is not studying either Latin or Greek to A-level standard. The winning essay will be published on the College’s website. Teachers wishing to encourage their students to enter the competition can download, display and circulate the competition poster in the ‘related documents’ section.

Essays can be from any discipline and should be on a topic relating to the reception of classical antiquity – including Greek and Roman literature, history, political thought, philosophy, and material remains – in any period to the present; essays on reception within classical antiquity (for instance, receptions of literary or artistic works or of mythical or historical figures) are permitted. Your submission must be accompanied by a completed information cover sheet. Essays should be between two-thousand and four-thousand words and submitted by the candidate as a Microsoft Word document through the form below.

Website: https://www.st-hughs.ox.ac.uk/prospectivestudents/outreach/mary-renault-prize/

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August 2020

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September 2020

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October 2020

#CFP GLOBAL CLASSICS AND AFRICA: PAST, PRESENT, AND FUTURE

Classical Association of Ghana: Second International Classics Conference in Ghana (ICCG)

University of Ghana, Legon, Ghana: October 8-11, 2020

The late 1950s and early 1960s ushered in a period when many African countries were gaining political independence. Immediately, there was an agenda to unite African nations, and a policy of Africanization began to gain ground. In the area of education, this Africanization process was vigorously pursued. In Ghana the Institute of African Studies was established, and an Encyclopaedia Africana project, originally conceived by W. E. B. DuBois, was revived. In Nigeria, new universities were established to counter the colonial-based education that was present at the University of Ibadan, and in some East African countries there were fears that foreign university teachers would not be able to further the Africanization of university education.

One of the fields of study singled out in this process of Africanization was Classics. Classics was believed to serve the interests of colonialism and neo-colonialism. Part of the agenda of this Africanization was to highlight African contributions to world civilization and to show that the ‘Western’ world could not lay claim to any superior heritage. As part of restitutive measures in the field, scholars have begun exploring the idea of ‘Global Classics’, showing how the Classics connects with the broad spectrum of humanity and society. While there is evidence to show that this kind of link has been explored since (or even before) the independence of African nations, it has begun to garner attention across the world. Yet, there are still places in Africa and other continents where Classics continues to be inward-looking and does not open itself to interdisciplinarity, collaborations, nor to other civilizations besides the Graeco-Roman world.

In the present context of globalization, and the decolonization and Africanization of education in Africa, how might we account for the role of Classics in Africa, and to what extent can the idea of ‘Global Classics’ be the way forward? We seek papers that explore these questions, from the earliest presence of Classical scholarship (broadly defined, and including archaeology, literature, material culture, anthropology, history, philosophy, linguistics, etc.) in Africa, and project what the future holds for Classics in Africa. We also welcome papers that draw lessons from non-African contexts. Papers may explore any of the following, as well as related, themes:

* academic freedom and politics
* African studies and global history
* Africanists/African-Americanists and the Classics
* art, museums, and architecture
* citizenship, migration, and cosmopolitanism
* classical connections with cognate and non-Classics disciplines
* comparative cultural reflections
* decolonization, pedagogy, and curriculum development
* economy, trade, and diplomacy
* gender and sexuality
* geography, environment, and development
* globalization, capitalism, and education
* race, ethnicity, and identity
* science, technology, and society
* war, peace, and democracy

Please submit abstracts of no more than 300 words for 20-minute papers to iccg@ug.edu.gh by December 15, 2019. We hope to send notifications of acceptance by January 31, 2020. Details of registration, travel, and accommodation will be communicated later. For enquiries, please email Gifty Katahena (kemgift@gmail.com) or Michael Okyere Asante (kwadwoasante1@gmail.com).

Organizing Committee:
Gifty Etornam Katahena, University of Ghana, Legon, Ghana
Peter K. T. Grant, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast, Ghana
Michael K. Okyere Asante, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch, South Africa
Daniel Orrells, King’s College, London, United Kingdom

A report on our collaboration with Eos at our first conference can be read at this link: https://www.eosafricana.org/collaborations/ghana-international-classics-conference-2019.

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/scs-news/cfp-global-classics-and-africa

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November 2020

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December 2020

#CFP SENECA 2020. INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE. WHAT MORE CAN WE SAY ABOUT SENECA?

University of Lisbon, Portugal: December 14-17, 2020

The Centre for Classical Studies of the School of Arts and Humanities of the University of Lisbon is organizing an International Conference on Seneca to promote and encourage a critical reflection on the permanence of themes, values, perspectives and representations of Seneca's works in Western literature and culture.

The Conference will take place between 14-17 December 2020, and, through the interdisciplinary debate of the contribution given by the experiences of researchers from different fields of study, it aims:

- to think of how Seneca became one of the most prominent figures in Western culture;
- to consider, examine and reflect on our current knowledge about Seneca, his life and works;
- to explore new study angles and what remains to be said about Seneca in the Twenty-First Century, in light of the renewed interest shown in his works.

Confirmed Keynote Speakers:
António Pedro Mesquita (University of Lisbon)
Alessandro Schiesaro (University of Manchester)
Catharine Edwards (University of Cambridge)
Gareth David Williams (Columbia University)
Chiara Torre (University of Milan)
Jesús Luque Moreno (University of Granada)
José Pedro Serra (University of Lisbon)
Martha Nussbaum (University of Chicago)
Paulo Sérgio Ferreira (University of Coimbra)

For further information, please visit our website: https://sites.google.com/view/seneca2020/p%C3%A1gina-inicial

Call for papers closes: January 31, 2020.

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Seneca2020

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/scs-news/conference-seneca-2020

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2021

RECEPTION AND EMOTIONS

University of Western Australia, Perth: date TBA

ANZAMEMS (Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies) is pleased to announce that the location of the Thirteenth Biennial ANZAMEMS Conference in 2021 will be The University of Western Australia, in Perth, Western Australia! The conference convenor will be Dr Kirk Essary, and the conference topic will be 'Reception and Emotions.' More details will be announced. #anza21

Website: https://anzamems.org/

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January 2021

#CFP [SCS PANEL] NEW DIRECTIONS IN MEDIEVAL LATIN

Annual Meeting of the Society for Classical Studies, Chicago IL, USA: January 7-10, 2021

Organized by the Medieval Latin Studies Group

The Medieval Latin Studies Group invites proposals for a panel on “New Directions in Medieval Latin” to be held at the annual meeting of the Society for Classical Studies in Chicago (January 7–10, 2021). The organizers especially welcome proposals for papers that, for example, demonstrate new methodologies and approaches, consider the concept of “the new” in medieval Latin language and literature, examine uncanonical medieval Latin texts and materials, introduce new resources for the study of medieval Latin, or seek to understand the medieval period in new ways, as well as papers that consider the current and future relationship of medieval Latin to the field of Classics.

Abstracts for papers requiring no more than 20 minutes to deliver must be received by February 16, 2020 via email attachment to Bret Mulligan (Haverford College) at bmulliga@haverford.edu. Questions may also be directed to Bret Mulligan. All submissions will be reviewed anonymously and speakers will be notified no later than the end of March 2020. Abstracts must be anonymous and follow the instructions for the format of individual abstracts that appear on the SCS web site. Membership in the Medieval Latin Studies Group is not required to submit an abstract but all persons who submit abstracts must be SCS members in good standing.

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/2021/152/new-directions-medieval-latin

 

 

#CFP [SCS PANEL] OVID AND THE CONSTRUCTED VISUAL ENVIRONMENT

Annual Meeting of the Society for Classical Studies, Chicago IL, USA: January 7-10, 2021

The International Ovidian Society invites abstract submissions for a panel on Ovid and the Constructed Visual Environment, which it will sponsor at the 2021 Annual Meeting of the SCS in Chicago.

Throughout his works, Ovid persistently incorporates the activity of viewing as a poetic subject, and evokes his audience’s experience as viewers of art works, spectacles, and landscapes. For this panel we invite contributions that investigate the dialogue between Ovidian poetry and the visual arts from both sides: How might readers’ cultural training as spectators and viewers contribute to their understanding of Ovid’s texts, and how might readings of Ovid affect how various audiences respond to and populate their visual environment? While this is a familiar topic in Ovidian studies, it is also a fundamental one, and subject to repeated transformation through new approaches to the study of ancient art and performance.

The International Ovidian Society was formed in 2019 and holds the status of Affiliated Group of the SCS. Among the Society’s greatest purposes are to encourage future scholarship on Ovid, to support younger scholars and new work in Ovid, and to reach out beyond Classics to scholars in other fields, as well as to performers and artists, who do significant work related to Ovid and Ovidian reception.

Send questions to the co-organizers, Andrew Feldherr (feldherr@princeton.edu) and Teresa Ramsby (tramsby@umass.edu).

Please send an abstract for a 20-minute paper as an email attachment to lfulkerson@fsu.edu by March 1, 2020, listing the title of this panel as the subject line of the email. The text of the abstract should not mention the name of the author, but the email message should provide name, abstract title, and affiliation. Abstracts must be 650 words or fewer and follow the SCS guidelines for individual abstracts (https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/guidelines-authors-abstracts), but should include works cited at the end of the document, not in a separate text box. Submissions will be reviewed by third-party referees, who will make final selections by April 1.

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/2021/152/ovid-and-constructed-visual-environment

 

 

#CFP [SCS PANEL] RACE, CLASSICS, AND THE LATIN CLASSROOM

Annual Meeting of the Society for Classical Studies, Chicago IL, USA: January 7-10, 2021

Sponsored by the American Classical League and organized by Ronnie Ancona, Hunter College and CUNY Graduate Center, NY, NY, Editor of The Classical Outlook; and John Bracey, Belmont High School, Belmont, MA.

The American Classical League invites scholars and teachers to submit abstracts for its affiliated group panel session, "Race, Classics, and the Latin Classroom," at the Chicago Annual Meeting of the Society for Classical Studies in January 2021. We welcome abstracts that address one or more of the following topics:

1) How does one's approach to teaching Latin impact enrollment and retention of students of color?

2) How can post-secondary schools better meet the needs of increasingly diverse groups of students entering their classes?

3) How can K-12 and post-secondary school teachers collaborate to create a more inclusive and equitable progression through the levels of Latin?

4) How does whitewashing the ancient world alienate potential students of color?

All papers should be accessible to a broad audience of classics scholars and teachers. Papers accepted for the panel will be published in The Classical Outlook, journal of The American Classical League, after additional peer review. By submitting an abstract, you agree to submit your paper for publication in CO, if the abstract is chosen for the panel. Abstracts should be submitted to Ronnie Ancona (rancona@hunter.cuny.edu) only, since she will be anonymizing them before they are forwarded to those who will choose the successful abstracts. Please submit as a Word document. Any questions about the panel may be addressed to her. Abstracts should conform to the instructions for the format of individual abstracts that appear in the SCS Guidelines for Authors of Abstracts: https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/guidelines-authors-abstracts

Please put "ACL panel at SCS 2021" in the subject line of your email submission. Include the title of your paper, your name, and your institutional affiliation (or status as Independent Scholar) in the email message, but make sure that your name (and any other identifying information) does not appear in the abstract itself. If you refer to your own scholarship in your abstract, cite it in the third person, as you would any other source.

You MUST be a member of SCS to submit an abstract. Please include in your email submission message your SCS member number and the date you joined or last renewed. (This will appear on your membership confirmation email from SCS and in your account.) You DO NOT have to be a member of ACL.

The deadline for the submission of abstracts is January 25, 2020.

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/2021/152/race-classics-and-latin-classroom

 

 

#CFP [SCS PANEL] SUBVERTING THE CLASSICS IN THE EARLY MODERN AMERICAS

Annual Meeting of the Society for Classical Studies, Chicago IL, USA: January 7-10, 2021

Organizers: Matthew Gorey, Wabash College (mgorey6@gmail.com); Adriana Vazquez, University of California, Los Angeles (avazquez@humnet.ucla.edu)

As the field of Classics grapples with its historical exclusion of marginalized groups and perspectives, scholars have increasingly sought to complicate Euro-centric and colonial narratives of classical reception in the early modern period by highlighting moments of subversive engagement with classical antiquity. In the wake of various influential studies that explored anti-imperialist patterns of classical reception in early modern vernacular epics, there has been burgeoning interest in recent years in extending these modes of interpretation to the literatures of Latin America. This ongoing effort has shed light on diverse authors and texts that actively undermined, reclaimed, and reshaped the classical tradition in innovative ways. Such work often brings into focus historically marginalized readers and interpreters of antiquity and offers original and overlooked frames for approaching ancient literature and its role in the narratives of the colonial era.

This panel aims to showcase receptions of Greco-Roman antiquity that subvert the dominant narratives of those who used the classical past to champion elite culture and imperial conquest, with a focus on texts written in—or about—Latin America in the early modern period (ca. 1500 - 1800). Possible areas of inquiry include:

* moments of classical reception that suggest alternative or subversive readings of ancient texts.
* receptions of Greco-Roman antiquity by historically marginalized voices, by those who champion the cause of the oppressed, and by those who seek to decolonize, democratize, or deconstruct the legacy of the ancient past through disruptive and original engagement with ancient material.
* how Latin American authors adopted or adapted classical literature to negotiate their own ethnic, religious, or national identities, often in contradistinction to European models.
* the limits of subversive allusion, and texts that problematize particular aspects of classical imperialism while still subscribing to some broader imperial framework.

Our panel thus aims to solidify a new, competing reception narrative for the antique past in which authors in the early modern Americas—whether indigenous peoples, mestizos, or European colonists and travelers—engaged with classical texts to critique or subvert political and cultural authorities, using the ancient past as a negative model against which to develop new national literary traditions.

Please send an anonymous abstract for a 20-minute paper as an email attachment to info@classicalstudies.org, with the title “Subverting the Classics in the Early Modern Americas” in the subject line. The deadline for submissions is February 7, 2020. Submissions should follow the SCS guidelines for individual abstracts and will be reviewed by the organizers, who will make final selections by the end of March.

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/2021/152/subverting-classics-early-modern-americas

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February 2021

#CFP CATHARTIC HISTORY

University of West Georgia, Carrollton, GA, USA: February 25-27, 2021

The aim of this conference and the edited collection that will result is to propose Aristotelian catharsis as a new lens for historical inquiry. The project aims to do so, specifically, through the study of cathartic history as a phenomenon in the Greco-Roman Mediterranean and in the field of Classical history today. In the process, the project will serve as an example of the productive application of catharsis to the study of the past, and thus a model for other fields of historical research.

While the study of the past as a healing experience is not entirely new, no uniform vocabulary exists at this time for talking about cathartic history. Rather, scholars who have written to elicit an emotional response from their audiences about the past, or who have chosen to consider their own emotional response to the past, have largely done so in passing or in popularly oriented publications, rather than using that emotional response as a bona fide category of historical analysis in and of itself. And yet, the historian’s selection of topics of research, both in the ancient world and in the historical profession today, is often motivated by personal experiences, broadly defined. This project aims to show that thinking about the past as a cathartic experience whether for us as historians, and/or for the ancient historians we study, and/or for our modern audiences, provides a new bridge for a productive academic dialogue of the past with the present.

Proposals are invited for 20-minute papers that consider (but are not limited to) the following questions:

* How might we apply the Aristotelian theory of catharsis to Greek and Roman historians?
* In what ways might the lens of catharsis enrich our reading of narratives of trauma (whether personal or literary or national) in the ancient sources?
* Are we pursuing catharsis in our own research whenever we focus on topics of personal relevance?
* Is historical research a cathartic experience? Should it be?
* In what ways could thinking about history through the lens of catharsis intersect with the increased interest in social justice within the field of Classics?

Please submit abstracts of 300-500 words by November 12, 2019 to Nadya Williams, nwilliam@westga.edu

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/scs-news/cfp-cathartic-history

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March 2021

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April 2021

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May 2021

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