ACRSN



Conferences

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An archive of conferences and previous calls for papers is available here

 

October 2018

FUTURE DIRECTIONS IN AUSTRALASIAN CLASSICAL RECEPTIONS

University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia: October 4-5, 2018

THURS 4 OCTOBER 9-5: A one-day conference, ‘Future Directions in Australasian Classical Receptions’; and / or

FRI 5 OCTOBER 10-3: A workshop for postgraduates and honours students on their current research in Classical Reception Studies.

Please send your abstracts for day one by 1 August to Marguerite Johnson, The University of Newcastle: marguerite.johnson@newcastle.edu.au.

Abstracts should be approximately 300 words.

Presentation will be 30 minutes + 10 minutes for questions.

Confirmed speakers:
Emeritus Professor John Davidson, Wellington
Professor Michael Ewans, Newcastle
Dr Laura Ginters, Sydney
Professor Chris Mackie, La Trobe
Dr Sarah Midford, La Trobe
Associate Professor Jane Montgomery Griffiths, Monash
Dr Reuben Ramsay, Newcastle
Dr Rachael White, Oxford
Dr Ika Willis, Wollongong

Postgraduates and honours students who wish to attend day two, should send an outline of their current – and/or future – projects, which will be workshopped with their peers and with scholars currently working in Classical Reception Studies.

Please send your outlines for day two by 1 August to Marguerite Johnson, The University of Newcastle: marguerite.johnson@newcastle.edu.au.

It is hoped that scholars researching at all levels – from academics, independent researchers, postgraduates, and honours students – will participate in both days. Postgraduates and honours students are also welcome to submit abstracts for day one, and academics and independent researchers are welcome to participate in the workshop on day two. Undergraduates are welcome to attend either one or both days.

Registration:
Two days: Waged: $120; Unwaged / Studying: $60
One day (either day one or day two): Waged: $60; Unwaged / Studying: $30.

There is a travel subsidy for up to three students who wish to participate in the workshop on day two.

Registration covers morning/afternoon tea and light lunch on day one; morning coffee and light lunch on day two.

The events will be held at The University of Newcastle, NSW.

As this is a preliminary call for papers, registration forms, venues, advice on travel and accommodation will be available in the next few weeks. In the meantime, please email to signal your interest, attendance and / or presentation.

Sponsored by The Centre for 21 Century Humanities, Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle.

Registration: https://payments.newcastle.edu.au/OneStopWeb/SHSSEvents/booking

Website: https://margueritejohnson1.wixsite.com/mysite

(CFP closed August 1, 2018)

 

 

AUTHOR.NET: A TRANSDISCIPLINARY CONFERENCE ON DISTRIBUTED AUTHORSHIP

UCLA: October 5-7, 2018

Co-Organizers: Francesca Martelli and Sean Gurd

Long associated with pre-modern cultures, the notion of “distributed authorship” still serves as a mainstay for the study of Classical antiquity, which takes 'Homer' as its foundational point of orientation, and which, like many other disciplines in the humanities, has extended its insights into the open-endedness of oral and performance traditions into its study of textual dynamics as well. The rise of genetic criticism within textual studies bears witness to this urge to fray perceptions of the hermetic closure of the written, and to expose the multiple strands of collaboration and revision that a text may contain. And the increasingly widespread use of the multitext in literary editions of authors from Homer to Joyce offers a material manifestation of this impulse to display the multiple different levels and modes of distribution at work in the authorial process. In many areas of the humanities that rely on traditional textual media, then, the distributed author is alive and well, and remains a current object of study.

In recent years, however, the dynamic possibilities of distributed authorship have accelerated most rapidly in media associated with the virtual domain, where modes of communication have rendered artistic creation increasingly collaborative, multi-local and open-ended. These developments have prompted important questions on the part of scholars who study these new media about the ontological status of the artistic, musical and literary objects that such modes of distribution (re)create. In musicology, for example, musical modes such as jazz improvisation and digital experimentation are shown to exploit the complex relay of creativity within and between the ever-expanding networks of artists and audiences involved in their production and reception, and construct themselves in ways that invite others to continue the process of their ongoing distribution. The impact of such artistic developments on the identity of 'the author' may be measured by developments in copyright law, such as the emergence of the Creative Commons, an organization that enables artists and authors to waive copyright restrictions on co-creators in order to facilitate their collaborative participation. And this mode of distribution has in turn prompted important questions about the orientation of knowledge and power in the collectives and publics that it creates.

This conference seeks to deepen and expand the theorising of authorial distribution in all areas of human culture. Ultimately, our aim is to develop and refine a set of conceptual tools that will bring distributed authorship into a wider remit of familiarity, and to explore whether these tools are, in fact, unique to the new media that have inspired their most recent discursive formulation, or whether they have a range of application that extends beyond the virtual domain.

We invite contributions from those who are engaged directly with the processes and media that are pushing and complicating ideas of distributed authorship in the world today, and also from those who are actively drawing on insights derived from these contemporary developments in their interpretation of the textual and artistic processes of the past, on the following topics (among others):

* The distinctive features of the new artistic genres and objects generated by modes of authorial distribution, from musical mashups to literary centones.
* The impact that authorial distribution has on the temporality of its objects, as the multiple agents that form part of the distribution of those objects spread the processes of their decomposition/re-composition over time.
* The re-orienting of power relations that arises from the distribution of authorship among networks of senders and receivers, as also from the collapsing of 'sender' and 'receiver' functions into one another.
* The modes of 'self'-regulation that authorial collectives develop in order to sustain their identity.
* Fandom and participatory culture, in both virtual and traditional textual media.
* The operational dynamics of 'multitexts' and 'text networks', and their influence by/on virtual networks.

Paper proposals will be selected for their potential to open up questions that transcend the idiom of any single medium and/or discipline.

Please send a proposal of approximately 500 words to gurds@missouri.edu by January 15, 2018.

Call: https://www.facebook.com/expressum/posts/821448078035772

Update (6 Sept, 2018) - Speakers:

Nandini Pandey, University of Wisconsin-Madison - The Anxieties of Distributed Authorship in the Vergilian Vita Tradition
Joseph Howley, University of Columbia - Not evenly distributed: pursuing 'the author' in Roman book slavery
Scott McGill, Rice University - Mega-Intertextuality: Writing and Reading Vergilian Centos
Alexis Crawshaw & Marcos Novak, University of California, Santa Barbara - Bridging the Ancient to the Digital Contemporary through Algorithmic Intertextuality
Pia Carolla, Universita Roma Tre - Distributed Authorship and Authoritative Texts; an Imperial Collection
Sandeep Bhagwati, Concordia University, Montreal - Notwithstanding Unique. Intertwined Authorship in Musical Comprovisation
Dorota Dutsch, University of California, Santa Barbara - Novelty and Meaning in a Pseudo-Pythagorean Network
Mario Biagioli, University of California, Davis - Ghostly Collaborations: making up co-authors in the age of big science
Daniel Selden, University of California, Santa Cruz - The Worlding of the Life of Ahiqar
Sergio Basso, Universita Roma Tre - The Barlaam and Joasaph - a New Paradigm Theory for its Formation
Francesca Martelli, University of California, Los Angeles - "Cicero's" Letters and the Selfie
Simon Biggs, University of South Australia - Distributed Authorship, Machine Learning and the heterogeneous Posthuman (dancing) subject.

(CFP closed January 15, 2018)

 

 

ANCIENT WORLD AND MODERN SOCIETIES: HOW CLASSICS HELP RESHAPE OUR WORLD

Dept of Classics, University of Reading: October 6, 2018

Beset by terrorism, environmental degradation, as well as by alienation and social inequalities often fanned by war, the modern world suffers from depression. Modern means of relief, such as the newest technological advancements, impose mass behaviour and threaten all facets of freedom. On the other hand, it is intriguing how easily the modern reader relates to a frustrated poet of the 1st c. AD. The opposition to moral decay and artistic decadence has indeed motivated authors of all times, from antiquity until the present day. Apart from their significance for literary studies and the subsequent development of respective theories, the thoughts of these authors can tell us much more about diachronic problems and the troubles of humanity.

At the same time, the ancient world reinvigorates almost every area of study and academic discipline. The aim of this workshop is to bring together those interested in applying the lessons from antiquity in the modern world or inspired by how the ancient world has shaped modernity and has the potential to improve aspects of everyday life. Academics and practitioners of every discipline are invited to share their experiences and suggest new ways the classical world can benefit our society. Themes could be (but are not limited to):

* How ancient medicine can open new roads and inform new methods.
* How educators across the globe make use of classical themes and texts for their pedagogical merits and how this can be expanded.
* How psychologists engage with ancient drama in the practice of dramatherapy.
* Approaches to how we can bridge the distance between reading a text and applying its content, or
* how one can embed a wider reception of Classics beyond the discipline.

Please send an abstract of 250 words or your enquiries to Andreas Gavrielatos (a.gavrielatos@reading.ac.uk) by 1 September EXTENDED DEADLINE 7 September. Presentations will be of 20 minutes followed by discussion. The workshop will be held on 6th October in the University of Reading, generously supported by the School of Humanities.

It’s not about learning from the past; it’s about learning FOR the future!

A note: It has come to our attention that some terms and statements in our CfP might have given an erroneous impression of the nature and purpose of the event. The aim of the event is simply to discuss the public utility of Classics in the modern world, and no political agenda lies behind it.

Program:

9:00 – 9:20 Registration
9:20 – 9:30 Introduction: Andreas Gavrielatos
9:30 – 10:05 Keynote Speaker: Susan Deacy (University of Roehampton), Turning Classical myth into a turning opportunity for autistic children

10:05 – 11:20 Session 1
Re-Telling Antiquity as an Educative Experience in Elderly Care and in Prison: The Penelope Project (2009–2012) & Cesare deve morire (2012) - Penelope Kolovou (Universities of Bonn - Sorbonne-Paris-IV)
We Need to Talk about Epizelus: ‘PTSD’ and the Ancient World - Owen Rees (Manchester Metropolitan University)
Dramatherapy: “Ancient things remain in the ear” - Trish Thomas (Independent Scholar)
11:20 – 11:45 Coffee break

11:45 – 12:20 Keynote speaker: Gabriele Galluzzo (University of Exeter), Ancient philosophy and modern life: different approaches

12:20 – 13:10 Session 2
Two Concepts of Heroism - David Hodgkinson (University of Oxford)
Reception: What's in it for us? - Paula James (Open University)
13:10 – 14:25 Lunch

14:25 – 15:40 Session 3
The Cyrus cylinder propaganda (*with the presentation of a historical archive film) - Mateen Arghandehpour (University College London)
The Axial Age of Ancient Greece and the Modern World - Athena Leoussi (University of Reading)
Urbanism, scale, and a break from the past - John William Hanson (University of Reading)
15:40 – 16:10 Coffee break

16:10 – 17:00 Session 4
New Old Values in Medical Ethics: The Case of Euthanasia - Michaela Senkova (University of Leicester)
Public perceptions of plagues in the Classical Tradition - James Cross (University College London)
17:00 – 17:30 Closing Remarks

Emma Aston (e.m.m.aston@reading.ac.uk)
Andreas Gavrielatos (a.gavrielatos@reading.ac.uk)

Call: https://listserv.liv.ac.uk/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind1808&L=CLASSICISTS&P=34441

(CFP closed September 7, 2018)

 

 

CLASSICS AND GLOBAL HUMANITIES

University of Ghana, Legon, Ghana: 11-12 October, 2018

Keynote Speaker: Prof. Barbara Goff, University of Reading, Reading, UK.

Studies have explored the cross-cultural engagement between Western civilisation and other cultures (Stephens and Vasunia 2010) as well as the legacy and reception of the Classics in the Arab world (Pormann 2015), India (Vasunia 2013), West Africa (Goff 2013; Goff and Simpson 2007) and recently, South Africa (Parker 2017). Classical reception studies thus continue to play a key role in bringing different parts of the world into greater dialogue with each other. We invite abstracts for papers not only from Classics but also from other disciplines and sub-disciplines which explore ways in which reception studies is giving a new voice to classical research in West Africa, consider ways in which Classics in West Africa engages with the legacies of Egypt, Greece, and Rome or examine cross-cultural themes in both ancient and modern traditions. We also welcome papers which draw lessons from other parts of Africa and the world.

The conference sub-themes might include but are by no means limited to the following:
* Africa in the Greek and Roman World
* Art and architecture
* Drama, theatre and literature
* Ancient, medieval and modern philosophy
* Democracy, culture and globalisation
* Politics, law, and public speaking
* Gender, slavery, and sexuality
* Race, ethnicity and identity
* Science and technology
* Geography and environment
* Medicine and health

Please send abstracts of no more than 300 words to CFPlegonclassics@mail.com by 30th June, 2018. Extended Deadline: July 8th, 2018.

Notification of acceptance: 31st July, 2018.

Organising Committee:
Martin Ajei, University of Ghana, Legon, Ghana.
Olakunbi Olasope, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria.
Peter Grant, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast, Ghana.
Kofi Ackah, University of Ghana, Legon, Ghana.

Call: https://listserv.liv.ac.uk/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind1805&L=CLASSICISTS&P=58260

(CFP closed July 8, 2018)

 

 

[WORKSHOP] DIGITISING THE CLASSICAL TRADITION

Split (Palace Milesi, Trg brace Radica 7): October 12-13, 2018

Organisation: Neven Jovanovic (Univ. of Zagreb), Martin Korenjak (Univ. of Innsbruck), Braco Lucin (Književni krug Split)

Friday, 12/10/2018

14:00–15:00 Gregory Crane (Leipzig): Early Modern Latin, 21st Century Europe and the work of Transnational Philology
15:00–16:00 Philipp Roelli (Zürich) & Jan Ctibor (Prag): Big Data in Latin Philology: the Corpus Corporum
16:00–16:30 Coffee
16:30–17:30 Neven Jovanovic (Zagreb): Exploring the CAMENA Corpus with BaseX
17:30–18:30 Manuel Huth (Würzburg): Opera Camerarii – a Semantic Database of the Printed Works of Joachim Camerarius (1500–1574) 20:00 Dinner

Saturday, 13/10/2018

9:00–10:00 Stefan Zathammer (Innsbruck): Noscemus – A Semantic Database for Scientific Literature in Latin Including a Digital Sourcebook Compiled with the Help of Transkribus
10:00–11:00 Bryan Brazeau (Warwick): Teaching an Old Database New Tricks: Migrating the Vernacular Aristotelianism in Renaissance Italy (VARI) Database to VARI 2.0: Discussion and Demonstration
11:00–11:30 Coffee
11:30–12:30 Peter Sjökvist & Anna Fredriksson (Uppsala): Digital Approaches to Early Modern Dissertations

Link: http://neolatin.lbg.ac.at/news/workshop-digitising-classical-tradition

 

 

«MULTAS PER GENTES ET MULTA PER AEQUORA VECTUS». TRAVELS AND TRAVELLERS FROM ANCIENT TO CONTEMPORARY AGE. (HISTORICAL DEBATES, 2ND EDITION.)

Vercelli, Italy: October 17-19, 2018

The specific methods and different approaches that characterize the historians’ craft sometimes make difficult to set up a dialogue that goes beyond traditional periodizations. Despite of shared themes, historians rarely operate in a common area of discussion. In order to promote a wide confrontation, the Second Edition of "Historical Debates" will focus on the theme of travel as one of the most recurring issues of historiographical reflection, with the purpose to promote a debate beyond these traditional divisions. Humanity has never been limited to frontiers. From Ancient Times to Contemporary Age societies have always met and cultures interacted and mixed by crossing borders and travelling.

Proposals can develop the following topics:

• Travel memories: historical accounts written by intellectuals, diplomatists, ecclesiastics, soldiers, merchants, scientists etc.
• Migrations: temporary or permanent movements of groups of people.
• Discoveries of new lands: colonization or exploration of continents or places madeby explorers and scientists, whether historians or technicians, space travels.
• Grand tours and study trips from Ancient to Contemporary Age.
• “Forced” journeys: people leaving their own land for political reasons.
• Pilgrimages and memorial trips: journeys towards places of worship and historical cultural heritage.

The Seminar is organized by History PhD Students of the Department of Humanistic Studies of the University of Eastern Piedmont “Amedeo Avogadro” with the purpose of encouraging the academic debate and strengthening our Academic Community:

1. Greek and Roman History (PhD Student: Martina Zerbinati)
2. Medieval History (PhD Student: Matteo Moro)
3. Modern History (PhD Students: Michela Ferrara, Eugenio Garoglio)
4. Contemporary History (PhD Student: Stefano Scaletta)

The Seminar will be held at the Department of Humanistic Studies in Vercelli from 17th October to 19th October 2018.

PhD students and young researchers interested in participating are warmly invited to submit to all our contacts a proposal including a brief CV (max. 5000 characters, spaces included), the name of the University in where they study, title of presentation together with a short abstract (max. 3000 characters, spaces included) within 15th June 2018. Proposals of students from University of Eastern Piedmont (except for the organizers) will not be accepted.

Selected speakers will be contacted within 29th June 2018.

Publication of papers with a scientific publisher is expected.

Contacts:
Michela Ferrara – (Modern History) 10038816@studenti.uniupo.it
Eugenio Garoglio – (Modern History) 20027194@studenti.uniupo.it
Matteo Moro – (Medieval History) 10023381@studenti.uniupo.it
Stefano Scaletta – (Contemporary History) 20022491@studenti.uniupo.it
Martina Zerbinati – (Ancient History) 20006283@studenti.uniupo.it

Call: https://www.disum.uniupo.it/call-papers-dibattiti-storici-ii-ed%C2%ABmultas-gentes-et-multa-aequora-vectus%C2%BB

(CFP closed June 15, 2018)

 

 

V INTERNATIONALCONFERENCE ON MYTHCRITICISM: MYTH AND AUDIOVISUAL CREATION - CLASSICAL MYTHS

Madrid (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid), Spain: 17-19 October 2018

The ÉTICAS GRIEGAS research group is pleased to announce the celebration of the international conference, dedicated to the study of Greek and Roman myths in audiovisual creation. On this occasion, “Classical Myths” is one of the four branches of the V International Congress of Mythcriticism “Myth and Myth and Audiovisual Creation”, which will be held at the UAH, UAM, UFV, and UCM from October 15 to 26, 2018.

Throughout the conference, the growing presence of the myths of Greece and Rome will be analyzed in the creative languages that fuse image and sound, especially in films, TV series and video games. We will also discuss the reception of classical myths in opera or theater, as well as their impact on contemporary arts that integrate the auditive and the visual to produce a new reality or language, as in comics, happenings, installations or performances.

What do we understand by classical mythology? Fundamentally and, usually, a set of Greek and Roman stories referring to gods and heroes, that is, to the two types of characters that were the object of worship in ancient cities.

The study of Greek and Roman mythologies is an indispensable piece to understand many of the keys of contemporary audiovisual creation. Starting from the Greek epic poems – the Iliad and Homer’s Odyssey – or the Latin epic – the Aeneid of Virgil -, we intend to approach the study of classical myths as a coherent whole in which each divinity, each mythological figure, exercises a concrete domain over the different spheres and institutions that structure social life. Likewise, we will study the audiovisual representation of the great mystery cults that arrive in Rome, imported from Egypt and the East, as well as the analysis of the conflictive relationships that primitive Christianity and the Fathers of the Church entered into with the myths of paganism.

During the conference, the mythical roots of the audiovisual themes will be explored, selecting from the corpus of the Greek and Roman myths those episodes that seem to lend themselves to a new reading, taking into account the most recent contributions of mythcriticism. For example, in The Warriors (Walter Hill, 1979), the withdrawal of Swan to his base in Coney Island “has something of a journey of Ulysses in his return to Ithaca”, which Roman Gubern identifies with “the theme of eternal return, of the return to the home”.

In the current audiovisual creation, we see the presence of the great themes of classical mythological structures: cosmogonies, theogonies, anthropogony, stories related to sacrifice, animals, gods and heroes of war and hunting, artisan gods, death, the erotic, philosophy and the city. It is, in short, to explore in what way the characteristic features and unique characters of Greco-Roman mythology, in the case of heroes, such as Odysseus, Achilles, Heracles / Hercules, the Amazons, the Argonauts, or the gods, as Zeus / Jupiter, Athena / Minerva, Apollo, Orpheus, Dionysus / Bacchus, Aphrodite / Venus, Hermes / Mercury or Bread, are translated into the language of audiovisual creation.

Deadline for abstracts: May 1, 2018.

Website: https://mythcriticism.com/en/classical-myths/

(CFP closed May 1, 2018)

 

 

THE FRAGRANT AND THE FOUL: THE SMELLS AND SENSES OF ANTIQUITY IN THE MODERN IMAGINATION

Toulouse, France: 18-20 October, 2018

Colloque international IMAGINES/ International Conference IMAGINES

The classical tradition has long confined Antiquity to an immaculate, sanitized whiteness : thus idealised, it was deprived of its multi-sensorial dimension, and conveniently limited to the visual paradigm. Olfaction, in particular, has often been overlooked in classical reception studies due to its evanescent nature which makes this sense difficult to apprehend. And yet, the smells associated with a given figure, or social group convey a rich imagery which conotes specific values : perfumes, scents and foul odours both reflect and mould the ways a society thinks or acts. The aim of this conference will be to analyse the underexplored role of smell – both fair or foul – in relation to the other senses, in the modern rejection, reappraisal or idealisation of Antiquity. We will pay particular attention to the visual and performative arts especially when they engage a sensorial response from the reader or the viewer.

We therefore invite contributions focusing not only on painting, literature, drama, and cinema but also on advertising, video games, television series, comic books and graphic novels, as well as on historical re-enactments which have recently helped reshape the perception and experience of the antique for a broader audience.

Conference papers (in English or French) will be twenty minutes in length. Topics may include, but are not limited to:

* The materiality of smell: what are the substances, plants and/or objects associated with antique smells in the modern imagination? To what extent may we confront current archeological data concerning the fragrant objects used in Antiquity with representations of smell in modern works? What new technical means are now mobilized to make modern audiences ‘smell’ and sense Antiquity (for instance in museums and multi-media productions)? We also invite papers that address the role flowers play in the modern construction of the antique smellscape and how this connects with the other senses.

* The sensoriality of antique rituals: How do fragrances (incense, burnt offerings, perfumed oils) shape modern representations of antique ritualistic and magical practices? To what extent does the staging of ritualistic gestures and objects associated with smell (and notably the burning of incense) create a form of estrangement between past and present, and deepen the rift between polytheistic and monotheistic faiths?

* The erotics of smell and scent: How was the antique body (both male and female) made desirable thanks to the use of perfume and cosmetics? How was this in turn exploited in painting, films, advertisement etc. – especially in connection with Orientalism? What role does smell play in gendered constructions of the antique body? What relation can we establish between the fragrant and the (homo)erotic? We also welcome discussions of modern representations of antique baths, hygiene and ‘sane’ classical bodies in relation to scent.

* Foul smells and diseased bodies: to what extent did the hygienistic shift which affected Western societies in the modern age (as described by A. Corbin) influence the perception of the antique smellscape? When did Goethe’s conception of the classical as ‘sane’ start being challenged? More generally, how are antique illnesses and decaying bodies depicted in the modern imagination and for example performed on stage or in historical reenactments aiming to recreate ‘authentically’ the experience of antique battles? Does smell have a specific social/national identity? Since Antiquity, whose bodies have been most recurrently perceived as pestilent: those of enemies, foreigners, lower social classes (artisans, peasants, slaves…)?

Proposals (300 words) and short biographies should be sent to Adeline Grand-Clément (adelinegc@yahoo.fr) and Charlotte Ribeyrol (ribeyrolc@gmail.com) no later than 15th December 2017.

The contributions must be original works not previously published. The abstract should clearly state the argument of the paper, in keeping with the topic of the conference.

A selection of contributions (in English) will be considered for a volume publication by Bloomsbury in the series ‘Imagines – Classical Receptions in the Visual and Performing Arts’.

Website: http://www.imagines-project.org/2018/05/the-fragrant-and-the-foul-conference-programme-released/

(CFP closed December 15, 2017)

 

 

ANABASES IN ANTIQUITY AND BEYOND. XENOPHON'S ANABASIS AND ITS LEGACY

Heraklion, Crete (Chamber of Commerce and Industry): 19-21 October, 2018

Program: http://www.philology.uoc.gr/conferences/Xenophons_Anabasis_&_its_Legacy_2018/Programme.pdf

 

 

MANIAS: MODERN DESIRES FOR GREEK PASTS

British Academy, London: October 25, 2018 (6:00 pm)

A panel discussion with Prof Liz Prettejohn (York), Prof Nicoletta Momigliano (Bristol), Dr Katherine Harloe (Reading), Dr Andrew Shapland (British Museum), and Dr Alexia Petsalis-Diomidis (St. Andrews).

Why does the Greek past fascinate us? Building on recent collective volumes published by the British School at Athens – Cretomania (2017) and Hellenomania (2018) – this panel brings together specialists on Greek material culture to discuss modern responses to and engagements with the Greek past. Topics to be explored include modern versions of the Iliad and the Odyssey, ancient Greek pots in Ottoman Greece, and more recent responses to the ancient worlds of Crete and Greece.

This event is free and will be followed by light refreshments. There is a suggested voluntary donation of £15 to attend. Cheques should be made payable to the ‘British School at Athens’ and may be sent in advance to the London Secretary, British School at Athens, 10 Carlton House Terrace, London SW1Y 5AH. A donation box for cash and cheques will also be available at the event. RSVP to Kate Smith if you would like to attend: bsa@britac.ac.uk / 0207 969 5315.

Source: https://classicalreception.org/event/manias-modern-desires-for-greek-pasts/

 

 

GALEN AND THE EARLY MODERNS

Ca’ Foscari University of Venice: October 25-26, 2018

Along with Hippocrates, Galen was the most celebrated physician of antiquity. Among ancient physicians, he was also the one who exerted the most persisting influence not only on western medical thought and practice but also on western culture and philosophy in general. In spite of their early medieval oblivion caused mainly by linguistic barriers, in the eleventh century Galen’s works began to circulate again in Europe through Arabic mediation. As soon as Latin translations made in Italy and Spain became available, Galen entered the canon of natural philosophy, medicine, and anatomy. This medieval and late-medieval revival of the Galenic tradition lasted throughout the early modern era up to the eighteenth century at least.

However, Galen’s influence was not limited to the medical field. Although his theories and practices certainly represented a mandatory reference for early modern anatomy, physiology, and therapeutics, Galen also contributed to orient the interpretation of Aristotle’s natural philosophy. In particular, his De usu partium was a reference work for any confrontation with the Aristotelian biological treatises. The famous Epode inserted as an appendix to this work strongly supported the theologically-oriented reading of Aristotle’s physics. Furthermore, the finalistic account of organic structures offered by De usu partium was an inspiring source for the eighteenth-century development of Teleology as an autonomous philosophical discipline.

So far, studies on Galen’s modern revival have focused mainly on the post-medieval period and the Renaissance. Frequent attention was paid especially to Galen’s presence in the medicine and physiology of the sixteenth century. The reasons for this emphasis are perfectly understandable, since the sixteenth-century edition of the Opera had the indeniable effect of reviving the interest in this author among both the medical and the philosophical communities.

On the other hand, this privileged focus on the sixteenth century may easily result in overlooking the long-term effect of Galen’s rediscovery, which in fact did not cease to exert its powerful influence both on medicine and philosophy during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Galen’s theories appear to be mentioned, endorsed, discussed or even fought in the works of first-rank scientists and philosophers such as Boyle, Cudworth, Malebranche, and Leibniz – just to name the best known ones. A still open question, for instance, concerns the extent to which Descartes’ physiology and especially his sketch of embriology might contain some implicit reference to Galen’s work as their polemical target.

In light of these considerations, the Venice conference aims to broaden the study of Galen’s reception in the early modern philosophy of nature, teleology, physiology, medicine, and philosophy of medicine by investigating his presence from the sixteenth to the eighteenth century. We therefore invite submissions on all aspects of the early modern reception of Galen’s scientific and philosophical works. Proposals on iconographical or iconological issues related to the early modern Galenic tradition will also be considered.

Keynote speakers: Raphaële Andrault, Dennis DesChene, Guido Giglioni, Hiro Hirai.

Please submit your proposal (max. 1,000 words) as a Word or PDF attachment to matteo.favaretti@unive.it

Submission deadline: 15 March 2018. Notification of acceptance will be sent by the end of April.

We will cover both accommodation and travel costs for speakers, provided that they travel in economy class and buy their tickets at least one month before the conference. Conference attendance is free. There are no registration fees.

This conference is organized by Emanuela Scribano and Matteo Favaretti Camposampiero. CREMT – Center for Renaissance and Early Modern Thought, Department of Philosophy and Cultural Heritage, Ca’ Foscari University of Venice

Speakers:

Dennis DesChene (Washington University in St. Louis), TBC
Hiro Hirai (Radboud University), Galen in the medical context of the scientific revolution
Elisabeth Moreau (Université Libre de Bruxelles), Galenism and matter theories in Renaissance physiology
Craig Martin (Ca’ Foscari University of Venice), Galen’s causes in the theoretical and practical medicine of Giambattista da Monte
Guido Maria Giglioni (University of Macerata), Galen and the irritable self: Reading De naturalibus facultatibus in the early modern period
Caroline Petit (University of Warwick), Galen, the early moderns and the rhetoric of progress
Fabrizio Baldassarri (HAB Wolfenbüttel / University of Bucharest) and Robert Vinkesteijn (Utrecht University), A green thread from Galen to early-modern medicine: The analogy between animals and plants
Andrea Strazzoni (University of Erfurt), Galenism as a driving force in ‘Cartesian’ medicine: The case of Henricus Regius
Raphaële Andrault (École Normale Supérieure de Lyon), Leibniz et l’Hymnus Galeni
Brunello Lotti (University of Udine), Galen as a source for natural theology in early modern British philosophy
Emanuela Scribano (Ca’ Foscari University of Venice), De usu partium: Mechanicism versus Galen
Gideon Manning (Claremont Graduate University), How to identify a Galenist: The case of Robert Boyle
Charles Wolfe (Ghent University), Galen’s contribution to the history of materialism
Matteo Favaretti Camposampiero (Ca’ Foscari University of Venice), Christian Wolff’s mechanization of Galen
Tinca Prunea-Bretonnet (University of Bucharest), Galen and eclectic philosophy in eighteenth-century Germany
Charles Goldhaber (University of Pittsburgh), The humors in Hume’s skepticism

Program: https://people.uniud.it/node/2224

Call: https://www.facebook.com/PhilosL/posts/1621409601272049

(CFP closed March 15, 2018)

 

 

CONFERENCE IN HONOUR OF CHRIS STRAY

Corpus Christi College, Oxford: October 27, 2018

A one-day conference on select topics in the history of classical scholarship will be held at Corpus Christi College, Oxford on Saturday 27 October 2018, to mark the 75th birthday of Chris Stray. The speakers will include Mary Beard (Cambridge), Jas Elsner (Oxford), Edith Hall (KCL), Judy Hallett (Maryland), Lorna Hardwick (Open), Chris Kraus (Yale) and Chris Pelling (Oxford).

A detailed programme will be posted nearer the date. Any enquiries should be sent to Stephen Harrison (Stephen.harrison@ccc.ox.ac.uk).

Source: https://listserv.liv.ac.uk/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind1801&L=CLASSICISTS&P=75895

Update (6 Sept, 2018):

Program: https://classicalreception.org/event/classics-and-classicists-a-colloquium-in-honour-of-christopher-stray/

Speakers:
Mary Beard (Cambridge) - Classics?
Jas’ Elsner (Oxford) - Room with a Few: The Fraenkel Room, the Refugee Scholars Room and the reception of Reception
Edith Hall (KCL) - Classics Invented: The Emergence of a Disciplinary Label 1670-1733
Judy Hallett (Maryland) - Gender and the Classical Diaspora
Lorna Hardwick (OU) - Tracking Classical Scholarship: myth, evidence and epistemology
Chris Kraus (Yale) - ‘Pointing the moral’ or ‘adorning the tale?’ Illustrations and commentary on Vergil and Caesar in 19th- and early 20th-century American textbooks.
Chris Pelling (Oxford) - Gomme’s Thucydides and the idea of a ‘historical commentary’.
Chris Stray (Swansea) - Closing remarks

Cost to non-speakers: £15.00 (please bring cash on the day); graduate students free of charge.

To book a place please e-mail Stephen.harrison@ccc.ox.ac.uk by 1st October.

 

 

IL SIMPOSIO INTERNACIONAL DE TRADICIÓN CLÁSICA

Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico: October 29-31, 2018

* Teoría y método
* Tragedia y comedia griegas y su recepción
* Uso y adaptación de los mitos clásicos en la literatura española
* La tradición de la retórica clásica
* Sistemas Culturales

Organizer: Dr. David García Pérez

Information: simposiotradicion@gmail.com & https://www.facebook.com/events/2045900145740753/

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November 2018

19TH UNISA CLASSICS COLLOQUIUM IN COLLABORATION WITH THE ARC DISCOVERY PROJECT, 'MEMORIES OF UTOPIA: DESTROYING THE PAST TO CREATE THE FUTURE (300-650 CE)'

Pretoria, South Africa: 7-10 November, 2018

We are pleased to announce the first call for papers for the annual Unisa Classics Colloquium in collaboration with the Australian Research Council (ARC) Discovery Project: “Memories of Utopia: Destroying the Past to Create the Future (300-650 CE)”.

The conference aims to explore a wide variety of aspects relating to the building, dismantling and reconstructing of memory and reputation across the various cultures bordering on the ancient Mediterranean, and over a wide time-frame. We know that memory and history are not fixed, objective occurrences, but are subjective representations of reality, and we can see evidence of this in the way in which those items which transmit memory are manipulated and used throughout antiquity. Memory and history, for example, are often reconstructed in light of various utopian (or even dystopian) ideals, thereby creating visions of the future that are based on strategic manipulations of the past. The unmaking and reconstitution of memory can be discreet, but more often occurs through violent means, whether through discursive and/or physical violence, which is an important aspect for further investigation.

The proposed conference aims to create fruitful interaction between the disciplines of Classics, Early Christian Studies, Late Antiquity and Byzantine Studies, by exploring both ancient written material and/or ancient material culture within the stated theme. The conference thus offers plenty of areas for further exploration, of which the following fields are a sample:

• Methodological considerations on the use of Memory Studies and Utopia Studies in the field of Ancient History
• From damnatio to renovatio memoriae. The mutilation, transformation and/or re-use of items representing the past such as buildings, statues and iconography
• The effects of iconoclasm and intersectional violence
• Spolia: from the narrative of power to repurposing of architectural fragments
• The importance of promoting or undermining ancestry in the ancient world, for example in Greek or Roman portraiture and busts and the recutting of busts to new portraits
• Continuity and change in historiography – debates on the past among the ancient historians
• The making and breaking of reputations, e.g. techniques and strategies (and their effectiveness) in ancient biography and hagiography
• Memory, utopia and ancient religion
• Utopias and the building of collective identities
• Building genealogies and ancestry, and aristocratic genealogy-competition and rivalry
• The purpose of evoking memory though Classical reception

Paper proposals (approximately 300 words) are invited for papers of 30 minutes debating current issues and problems on any aspect of the above theme.

Abstracts and titles should include your name and university affiliation, and should be submitted to either:
• Prof Martine De Marre (Ancient History and Classics) at dmarrmea@unisa.ac.za or dmarrmea@gmail.com
• Prof Chris de Wet (Early Christian Studies) at chrisldw@gmail.com

Deadline for abstracts: 30 June 2018

We look forward to hearing from you, and please do not hesitate to contact us at the addresses provided above if you have any queries.

Call: https://www.facebook.com/expressum/posts/895844247262821

(CFP closed June 30, 2018)

 

 

[PANEL] CLASSICAL ANTIQUITY: SCREENING THE 'POLITICAL ANIMALS' OF THE ANCIENT MEDITERRANEAN WORLD

An area of multiple panels for the 2018 Film & History Conference: Citizenship and Sociopathy in Film, Television, and New Media

Madison Concourse Hotel and Governor’s Club, Madison, WI (USA): November 7-12, 2018

Full details at: www.filmandhistory.org/conference

Aristotle famously defined humans as “political animals”: organizing themselves within the social structure of the polis and its codes of conduct, defining members from outsiders and different types of member in relation to each other and to the whole. From the time of the city’s foundation, Romans were no less concerned with the civitas and citizen status — increasingly so as Roman imperium expanded to encompass ethnic “Others.” The narratives generated and consumed by these societies both acknowledged and questioned the clarity of these theoretical concepts: the Odyssey marks Penelope’s aristocratic suitors as morally base and condemns them to divinely-authorized death worthy of enemies; Herodotus and Thucydides observe the increasingly despotic behavior of democratic Athens, as compared to both “barbarian” and other Greek adversaries; Livy emphasizes how abducted Sabine women stopped a war by asserting their own status and moral authority as Roman wives. Perhaps Julius Caesar would have been reviled as a traitor for his march on Rome, like the failed insurrectionary Catiline, had Caesar’s heir Octavian not gained control over the state, proclaiming the assassinated dictator in perpetuo divine and himself princeps.

All depictions of socio-political relations within the frameworks of kingdom, ethnos, polis, civitas, and empire in the ancient Mediterranean world have been shaped and reshaped through the lens of subsequent interest—both in antiquity and in modernity. The Classical Antiquity area solicits abstracts for papers that discuss how film, television, video games, and other screen media represent these relations and frameworks, on topics including but not limited to:

--how representations help modern audiences to imagine those social relations through dramatization — or promise to, despite reshaping ancient accounts to modern tastes

--how representations radically re-envision ancient accounts of political actors and communities to suit contemporary purposes (e.g. the noble rebel Spartacus in Kubrick’s 1960 film or the vengeful survivor Artemisia in 2013’s 300: Rise of an Empire)

--how modern social constructs (e.g. race, sexuality, gender) have been retrojected into depictions of ancient communities and individuals’ relations to each other and that whole

--how depictions of epochal shifts (e.g. constitutional, epistemological) redefine enfranchised/disenfranchised, subversive/revolutionary, patriot/traitor, barbarian/civilized

--how a “bad ruler/system” is critiqued by focus on a good/conscientious community member, or a “good ruler/system” is destroyed by criminality/sociopathy

--“rise and/or fall” narratives that turn on revolution, civil war, tyrannical coup, restoration

--use of ancient Mediterranean societies to stage modern romance with e.g. democracy, republicanism, fascism, imperialism

Proposals for complete panels of three related presentations are also welcome, but should include an abstract and contact information (including email) for each presenter.

DEADLINE for abstracts: 1 June 2018.

Please e-mail your 200-400-word proposal to the area chair: Meredith Safran, Trinity College - classicsonscreen@gmail.com

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/scs-news/call-papers-screening-political-animals-ancient-mediterranean

(CFP closed June 1, 2018)

 

 

HEIDEGGER AND THE CLASSICS

Senate House, London: November 8th, 2018

The Centre for the Reception of Greece and Rome (CRGR) at Royal Holloway, University of London is pleased to announce that a one-day workshop on the relationship between Martin Heidegger and the Classics will be held at Senate House, London on November 8th 2018.

Martin Heidegger remains a controversial figure not just in the history of western philosophy but in just about every school of thought that his philosophy pervades. He is widely regarded, along with Wittgenstein, as one of the most important philosophers of the twentieth century and the limit of his influence, encompassing the likes of Gadamer, Foucault, Arendt, Koselleck, Derrida, and Sartre, is beyond measure. The source of Heidegger’s controversy, notwithstanding his political views and allegiances, is the radical nature of his appropriation and reformulation of practically every major philosophical development since antiquity. He conceived of his project as the overcoming of metaphysics that was initiated by Plato, advanced through Aristotle, Descartes, Kant, and Hegel, and brought to completion by Nietzsche. In doing so, he upturned nearly 2,500 years of western thought in order to turn philosophy back to what he conceived to be its fundamental, yet forgotten, question: the question of Being. In the Classics, Heidegger is largely ignored. This is perhaps somewhat puzzling given the extent to which the evolution of Classical scholarship over the past century has been grounded in precisely those conceptual developments - hermeneutics, experientialism, intertextuality, narratology, and postmodernism - that Heidegger has, to some degree or another, influenced. It is the purpose of this workshop to assess the nature and legitimacy of Heidegger’s broad exclusion from Classical discourse and to determine how, if at all, his philosophy might be reconciled with modern studies of the ancient world.

The workshop will focus on the following three core points of discussion, which inevitably interrelate, but all the same require definition:

1) The Classics in Heidegger
* What is the nature of Heidegger’s engagement with the Classics?
* To what extent does Heidegger misappropriate the Presocratics, Plato, and Aristotle?
* How are they incorporated into his work and what do they contribute to his overall project?
* What is Heidegger’s interest in the wider Classical literature (tragedy, poetry, history)?
* How is Greek language employed/manipulated by Heidegger?

2) The Classics against Heidegger
* Does the Classics have a bad relationship with Heidegger?
* Why does such a paucity of Heideggerian philosophy in modern studies of the ancient world endure?

3) Heidegger in Classical Scholarship
* In what ways has Heidegger so far contributed to modern Classical scholarship?
* To what extent can a reading of Heideggerian philosophy, encompassing his observations on concepts such as time, truth, subjectivity, method, and history, inform our understanding of ancient thought?

The workshop consists of four individual papers and three roundtable discussion sessions corresponding to the above divisions.

Confirmed Speakers:
Prof. Andrew Benjamin (Kingston University)
Prof. Robert Eaglestone (Royal Holloway, University of London)
Dr. Katherine Fleming (Queen Mary, University of London)
Prof. Denis McManus (University of Southampton)

Confirmed Discussants
Prof. Emanuela Bianchi (NYU)
Prof. William Fitzgerald (Kings College London)
Prof. Laurence Hemming (Lancaster University)
Prof. Brooke Holmes (Princeton University)
Dr. Kurt Lampe (University of Bristol)
Prof. Miriam Leonard (UCL)
Dr. Daniel Orrells (Kings College London)
Prof. Mark Payne (University of Chicago)
Prof. Thomas Sheehan (Stanford University)

Registration for the workshop will open on August 1st once the programme and other details have been finalised. If you have any queries in the meantime, please get in touch with me at aaron.turner@rhul.ac.uk.

Organisers:
Dr. Aaron Turner (Royal Holloway, University of London)
Prof. Ahuvia Kahane (Royal Holloway, University of London)

Source: https://listserv.liv.ac.uk/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind1806&L=CLASSICISTS&P=80519

Website: https://heideggerandtheclassics.com/

 

 

ANNUAL MEETING OF POSTGRADUATES IN RECEPTION OF THE ANCIENT WORLD (AMPRAW)

2018: University of Coimbra, Portugal: November 8-​10 2018. https://ampraw2018.wixsite.com/home/. See below for CFP (closed June 1, 2018)
2017: University of Edinburgh: 23-24 November 2017 - https://ampraw.wixsite.com/ampraw2017. Twitter: @ampraw2017
2016: University of Oxford: 12-13 December 2016 - https://amprawoxford.wordpress.com/
2015: University of Nottingham: 14-15 December 2015 - ampraw2015.wordpress.com/ - Twitter: @AMPRAW2015
2014: University of London: 24-25 November 2014 - ampraw2014.wordpress.com/.
2013: University of Exeter.
2012: University of Birmingham.
2011: University College London.

AMPRAW 2018: ANNUAL MEETING OF POSTGRADUATES IN THE RECEPTION OF THE ANCIENT WORLD

University of Coimbra, Portugal: November 8-​10, 2018

It is with great pleasure that we announce the Annual Meeting of Postgraduates in the Reception of the Ancient World​ 2018​​.​ AMPRAW ​2018 will be a two-day conference (November 8th-9th)​ ​​aiming to provide postgraduate students from all disciplines with the opportunity to present their research to the growing academic community focusing on classical reception. A third day, Saturday, will be devoted to a cultural visit to Coimbra and Conímbriga Ruins.

We propose Corpus/Corpora as the main theme, more specifically its dialectical relations between physical/individual/material body and social/collective/conceptual body. By motivating submissions on this subject, we intend to open up several corpora to multiple layers of instantiation, from a meditation on the body itself (thus playing with the relation between the literary “corpus” and the lived body) to an ethical assessment of the possibilities laid out by hermeneutics’ continuous reinterpretation of the classical heritage. Following that line of thought, bodily experiments linked to theatre or music are among our range.

In fact, without any chronological restriction, we welcome proposals exploring the reception of corpus/corpora in different areas, such as:
* literary texts (including their transmission and reception), philosophy, and arts (e.g. painting, sculpture, dance, cinema or television).
* How does one envision the religious, social, economical, political and gendered expressions of the body?
* How does a body see, understand and conceive another body?
* How does a body relate to itself?
These are some of the many questions we intend to reflect upon.

We welcome abstracts for twenty-minute papers (250 words). ​All proposals should be sent using the online form at https://ampraw2018.wixsite.com/home/call-for-papers by June 1st 2018.​​​ Languages accepted are English and Portuguese. Some bursaries for two nights accommodation will be available. Lunches and coffee breaks will be provided to all participants.

For more information​ ​on location and accommodation, please visit​ ​https://ampraw2018.wixsite.com/home​ ​and for up-to-date details join Facebook Group AMPRAW 2018 https://www.facebook.com/groups/224418934806398/.

Should you have any other question, please send us an e-mail to​ ampraw2018@gmail.com​​. ​

(CFP closed June 1, 2018)

 

 

CATULLUS IN THE TREEHOUSE RIDES AGAIN

University of Newcastle (NSW), Australia: November 9, 2018

In 2004, Catullus scholars gathered in the Treehouse at The University of Newcastle to talk Catullus. This memorable event, aptly named ‘Catullus in the Treehouse,’ resulted in the first Special Issue of Antichthon, ‘Catullus in Contemporary Perspective’ in 2006.

After 14 years, and due to popular demand, it’s time to revisit ‘Catullus in the Treehouse’ with another one-day conference to celebrate Catullus, his poetry, his life and his legacy.

‘Catullus in the Treehouse Rides Again’ will be held at The University of Newcastle on: Friday 9 November 2018, 9 am – 5 pm.

If you would like to present a paper (30 or 40 minutes), please send an abstract between 300-500 words by 1 September to Marguerite Johnson (The University of Newcastle) marguerite.johnson@newcastle.edu.au & Leah O’Hearn (La Trobe University) ohearn.l@students.latrobe.edu.au.

Postgraduates and honours students who wish to present are welcome. Undergraduates are also welcome to attend the conference.

Registration: Waged: $60; Unwaged / Studying: $30
Registration covers morning/afternoon tea and light lunch.

The events will be held at The University of Newcastle, NSW (Callaghan Campus).

As this is a preliminary call for papers, registration forms and advice on travel and accommodation will be available in the next few weeks. In the meantime, please email to signal your interest, attendance and / or presentation.

More information: https://www.newcastle.edu.au/about-uon/governance-and-leadership/faculties-and-schools/faculty-of-education-and-arts/school-of-humanities-and-social-science/conferences/catullus-in-the-treehouse-rides-again

(CFP closed September 1, 2018)

 

 

MAPPING WORKSHOP [CLAIMING THE CLASSICAL (CTC): CLASSICS AND POLITICS IN THE 21ST CENTURY]

Institute of Classical Studies, Senate House, Malet Street, London: November 9, 2018

This workshop will ‘map’ how Greco-Roman antiquity is being deployed in political rhetoric in the 21st century, identifying differences across national and continental boundaries as well as across the political spectrum.

Does invoking the Spartans mean something different in the banlieues of Paris from what it means in Charlottesville, Virginia? If Europa on the bull represents internationalism in Brussels, what does it signify in Beirut, Brisbane, or Beijing? Looking internationally, does the Right make more use of classical antiquity than the Left? And if so, why?

The workshop will feature a combination of formal papers and discussion sessions. The range, extent, and nature of politicised appropriations of antiquity during the twenty-first century will be mapped; considering geographical, social, and ideological variation.

Following the workshop, we will draft a short paper, offering a ‘snapshot’ of how classics is currently being used in political discourse globally. This will be made available freely online, to inform future research.

Call for papers: We are inviting proposals for brief papers focusing on a specific country or other defined area (15 mins), as well as for spotlight talks on particular cases (5 mins). Funds are available to support travel and accommodation for early career researchers and international participants.

Extended Deadline: 1st July 2018 7th July, 2018.

Please email your proposals to either: Naoíse Mac Sweeney (nm241@le.ac.uk) or Helen Roche (hber2@cam.ac.uk)

Call: https://claiming-the-classical.org/events/

(CFP closed July 7, 2018)

 

 

[PANEL] MEDEA ON THE CONTEMPORARY STAGE & SCREEN

Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association (PAMLA)

Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA: November 9-11, 2018

In recent years, the afterlives of Greek tragedy have received special attention in the rapidly expanding field of classical reception studies. With reincarnations ranging from Japanese Noh theater to the Mexican screen, Euripides’ Medea is now more than ever a truly global “classic.” The time is ripe for dedicated focus on Medea and its traditions in contemporary theater and film.

The panel organizers (Zina Giannopoulou, University of California, Irvine; Jesse Weiner, Hamilton College) invite proposals for papers on receptions of Euripides’ Medea on the contemporary stage and screen, to be presented at the annual meeting of the Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association. The conference will take place Nov. 9-11, 2018 at Western Washington University in Bellingham, WA. Questions papers might address include but are not limited to:

* Medea assumes many roles in Euripides’ play, from abject suppliant to dea ex machina. How do recent adaptations of Medea portray Medea’s inherent theatricality?
* How have different translations of Medea affected the performance of the play?
* How have late 20th and 21st century stagings of Medea departed from previous models and trends?
* How have non-Western dramatic traditions (for example Japanese Noh) adapted Medea and how might they inflect our readings of their classical source text?
* How have recent dramatic productions of Medea staged or rewritten the infanticide?
* How have recent Medeas on stage and screen engaged with social and institutional hierarchies, including (but not limited to) issues of race, class, gender, nationality, and citizenship, and how have these issues and identities intersected with one another?

Paper proposals must be submitted through PAMLA’s online submission platform by May 30, 2018.

Please contact the session organizers, Zina Giannopoulou (zgiannop@uci.edu) and Jesse Weiner (jweiner@hamilton.edu) with any questions.

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/scs-news/call-papers-medea-contemporary-stage-and-screen

(CFP closed May 30, 2018)

 

 

HYBLAEA AVENA - RECEPTION OF THEOCRITUS IN GREEK AND LATIN LITERATURE OF THE ROMAN IMPERIAL AND EARLY MODERN PERIOD

Bergische Universität Wuppertal, Germany: November 15-16, 2018

Keynote Speaker: Prof. Richard Hunter, Trinity College, Cambridge

Pipes being handed down from one shepherd to another in the tradition of music making can easily be imagined as a scenario in real life, whether in ancient times or today. And indeed, some pipes from antiquity are still in use 2000 years later, at least metaphorically speaking. Easy to track are the ones Theocritus used in creating the genre of pastoral poetry with idyllic landscapes and characters that seem to be transported from their real life duties and dialogues into the realm of verses. His pipes are depicted as the instrument of the predecessor offered to a poet of a new era and language in Virgil’s 10th eclogue (Verg. ecl. 10,51: carmina pastoris Siculi modulabor avena), and are from there given to another even later poet in Theocritus’ and Virgil’s footsteps, Calpurnius Siculus (Calp. 4,62f.: Tityrus hanc [sc. fistulam] habuit, cecinit qui primus in istis / montibus Hyblaea modulabile carmen avena). This tradition was renewed, when the Greek text of Theocritus was rediscovered and printed for the first time during the Renaissance. Thus, Joachim Camerarius, for instance, coined Greek and Latin verses inspired both by Virgil and Theocritus. Finally, the Leipzig schoolmaster Johann Gottfried Herrichen even staged his Greek idylls so that they came back to life using perhaps also real pipes.

Hence a tradition and continuity in the bucolic genre and beyond can be traced back to the inventor, still hundreds of years later. As others have recently concentrated on the reception of Theocritus in comparative studies beginning in antiquity moving to modern times and modern languages (e.g. M. Paschalis [ed.]: Pastoral Palimpsests. 2007; H. Seng/I. M. Weis [eds.]: Bukoliasmos. 2016), the two day-conference Hyblaea avena aims at a new focus in a selected and narrower timeframe, namely the reception of Theocritus in Greek and Latin literature in the Roman empire (1st-6th c.) and the early modern age (15th-17th c.). Within the early modern period, we would like to concentrate on imitations in Greek but of course not exclusively. A view into Byzantine literature is also welcome.

Beyond the passing of pipes the main focus of the meeting is exemplified by the following questions that can be asked or can be answered afresh:

- What role did the reception of Theocritus play in Greek and Roman literature?
- How is the imitation of Theocritus made explicit?
- Which part of Theocritus was used and which was neglected?
- Is the imitation of Theocritus sometimes deliberately left out and why?
- What are the new contexts and functions of Theocritean scenarios and allusions?
- How was Theocritus integrated into other literary genres (e.g. epic poetry or anacreontic verse)?
- What was the impact of the edition of Theocritus, either as the original text or as a translation?
- How did the renaissance of Theocritus during the early modern age change the way poetry was written?

We cordially invite papers of approx. 20-30 minutes in length, with following time for questions and discussion. The languages of the meeting are German and English. Please submit titles and abstracts (as pdf-attachments) of approx. 500 words, along with a short CV and contact details by 30th April 2018 to either Stefan Weise or Anne-Elisabeth Beron. Applicants will be notified of the organizers’ decision shortly thereafter.

The publication of a conference volume is planned. Travel and lodging expenses will be covered for selected speakers.

Contact: Jun.-Prof. Dr. Stefan Weise (weise@uni-wuppertal.de) & Anne-Elisabeth Beron (beron@uni-wuppertal.de).

Speakers:

Keynote: Richard Hunter (Cambridge): The Prehistory of Theocritus’ Nachleben
Valeria Pace (Cambridge): Class in Daphnis & Chloe and Theocritus
Anne-Elisabeth Beron (Wuppertal): Standing in Tityrus’ Shadow: Theocritus in the Political Eclogues of Calpurnius Siculus
Hamidou Richer (Rouen): Three Faces of Theocritus during the Roman Empire
Manuel Baumbach (Bochum): Bienenstich und Hyazinthenschläge: die Schattenseiten der Bukolik im poetischen Raum der Carmina Anacreontea
John B. Van Sickle (New York): Traces of Virgil and Ovid in the Translation of Theocritus by Eobanus
Christian Orth (Freiburg i. Br.): Theokritrezeption in den griechischen Eklogen von Joachim Camerarius
Thomas Gärtner (Köln): Die diversen Reflexe des Epitaphium Bionis bei Lorenz Rhodoman
Janika Päll (Tartu): Greek Bucolic Cento in Early Modern European Poetry Merging Theocritus and Virgil
Stefan Weise (Wuppertal): „Der berühmte Leipziger Theocritus“ – Zu Theokritrezeption und Performanz in den Idyllia Graeca solennia von Johann Gottfried Herrichen
William Barton (Innsbruck): Adam Franz Kollár’s Χάριτες εἰδύλλιον (1756): Theocritean Praise of Maria Theresa and her Educational Developments

Call: https://www.facebook.com/expressum/posts/903491503164762

(CFP closed April 30, 2018)

 

 

THE MAKING OF THE HUMANITIES VII

University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands: 15-17 November, 2018

‘The Making of the Humanities’ conference returns to Amsterdam! This is the place where the conference series started in 2008, 10 years ago. The University of Amsterdam will host the 7th Making of the Humanities conference at its CREA facilities, from 15 till 17 November 2018.

Goal of the Making of the Humanities (MoH) Conferences: The MoH conferences are organized by the Society for the History of the Humanities and bring together scholars and historians interested in the history of a wide variety of disciplines, including archaeology, art history, historiography, linguistics, literary studies, media studies, musicology, and philology, tracing these fields from their earliest developments to the modern day.

We welcome panels and papers on any period or region.

Deadline for paper and panel submissions: 1 June 2018.

For the full Call for Papers and Panels, see http://www.historyofhumanities.org/

(CFP closed June 1, 2018)

 

 

II ANIHO YOUNG RESEARCHERS’ CONFERENCE – IV SHRA: ANTIQUITY AND COLLECTIVE IDENTITIES: FROM THE MIDDLE AGES TO THE CONTEMPORARY WORLD

Faculty of Arts of the University of the Basque Country, in Vitoria-Gasteiz (Spain): November 21, 2018

In the following link you can download the CFP for the II ANIHO Young Researchers’ Conference – IV SHRA: Antiquity and Collective Identities: from the Middle Ages to the Contemporary World.

Deadline: September 5, 2018

Call: https://aniho.hypotheses.org/255

(CFP closed September 5, 2018)

 

 

CLASSICAL MATERIAL CULTURE IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY

London (Keynes Library, Birkbeck School of Arts, 43 Gordon Square): November 22-23, 2018

On 1st December 2018 the second cast court at the Victoria and Albert Museum will reopen to the public after an extensive programme of renovation. First opened in 1873 as the Architectural Courts, the two cast courts at the Victoria and Albert Museum contain casts of medieval and renaissance monuments from all over the world, as well as classical casts, including Trajan’s column from the second century AD.

This conference brings together scholars working across a range of disciplines (art history, classics, literature) to discuss the reception of classical material culture in the nineteenth century. It begins on the evening of Thursday 22nd November with a lecture by Holly Trusted, Senior Curator of Sculpture at the V&A on the redesigned cast courts and the following day, speakers discuss the mediation of classical material culture across a range of nineteenth-century cultural production including paintings, photographs, sculpture, book illustrations, and various writing genres including art criticism, theory, the novel and poetry. The conference will ask how writers and artists encountered the materiality of the ancient world. What was the role of reproduction in recreating the antique past? What kind of embodied relationships underpin nineteenth-century engagements with classical material culture? How did the remodelling of ancient histories shape questions of national identity, religion, gender?

Join us as we explore the nineteenth century’s fascination the material culture of the ancient world.

Organised by the Birkbeck Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies. Please contact Dr Vicky Mills (v.mills@bbk.ac.uk) with any queries

Speakers and respondents: Rees Arnott-Davies (Birkbeck), Patrizia di Bello (Birkbeck), Jason Edwards (York), Catharine Edwards (Birkbeck), Stefano Evangelista (Oxford), Melissa Gustin (York), Shelley Hales (Bristol) Victoria Mills (Birkbeck), Kate Nichols (Birmingham) Lindsay Smith (Sussex), Holly Trusted (V&A), Caroline Vout (Cambridge) Rebecca Wade (Leeds Museums and Galleries)

Programme

Thursday 22nd November

Holly Trusted (Senior Curator of Sculpture, V&A) ‘Displaying Plaster Casts at the Museum: South Kensington and the Reproduction of Sculpture’ Introduced by Victoria Mills (Birkbeck)

6-7.30 pm followed by drinks

Friday 23rd November

9.30-10.00 Registration

10.00-11.00 Jason Edwards (York) ‘Sodomising Edward Bulwer-Lytton, or Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick’s Last Days of Pompeii’. Introduced by Luisa Calè (Birkbeck)

11.00-11.30 Coffee break

11.30-1pm. Panel one: Gendering C19 Classical Material Culture.

Victoria Mills (Birkbeck) ‘Text, image and the sculptural body in Victorian antique fiction’

Catharine Edwards (Birkbeck) ‘Encounters with an alien world? C19th British and Irish women travellers to Rome’

Chair: Hilary Fraser, Birkbeck

1pm-2pm Lunch

2-3:30pm Panel two: Sculpture, Reproduction, Aesthetics

Rees Arnott Davies (Birkbeck) ‘‘The most violent enthusiasm’ – Henry Hart Milman’s critique of Winckelmann’s aesthetic experience’.

Rebecca Wade (Leeds Museums and Galleries ) – ‘The Lost Leeds Cast Collection, 1888-1941’

Melissa Gustin (York) ‘American Psychopomp: Harriet Hosmer’s Pompeian Sentinel and Problems with Plaster’

Chair: Carrie Vout, (Cambridge)

3:30-4.00.pm coffee break

4.00-5.00pm: Lindsay Smith (Sussex), ‘Photographers in Athens 1840-1879’. Introduced by Patrizia di Bello (Birkbeck)

5.00-5.45pm – Response panel/discussion: Patrizia di Bello (Birkbeck); Shelley Hales (Bristol); Kate Nichols, (Birmingham); Stefano Evangelista (Oxford)

5.45-7.00 Drinks

Registration is free but required. Please book your free ticket here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/classical-material-culture-in-the-nineteenth-century-tickets-48774520905

Information: http://www.cncs.bbk.ac.uk/thursday-friday-22-23-november-classical-material-culture-in-the-nineteenth-century/

 

 

'CLASSICAL DISPLACEMENT(S)': AN INTERDISCIPLINARY ONE-DAY CONFERENCE ON THE DISPLACEMENT OF MARGINALISED IDENTITIES THROUGH AND WITHIN THE CLASSICS

Senate House, London: November 23, 2018

Keynote Speaker: Katherine Fleming

Voices that were once kept at the fringes of the Classics have begun to claim a role at the heart of the discipline, particularly through the lens of Classical Reception. Yet antiquity is still appropriated to justify nationalism, misogyny and homophobia. How can we negotiate this crisis of representation surrounding the Classics?

This interdisciplinary colloquium aims to explore the involvement of Greco-Roman antiquity, appropriated by societies throughout history, in the displacement and marginalisation of minority identities. It will also consider the response of those marginalised voices - how groups excluded from and through the Classics have used antiquity to reassert subjectivities. We welcome abstracts for 20-minute papers that consider such questions as:

* How have the Classics been used as a tool of displacement and marginalisation?
* How have those who have been marginalised responded to their displacement through the Classics?
* How have the Classics themselves been displaced?
* How have marginalised identities and voices within the Classics been repressed or ‘rescued’?
* How have reactionary narratives used the ancient world to reinforce exclusionary practices?

We also welcome papers on related themes.

We invite contributions from postgraduates and early career researchers. We hope to foster an interdisciplinary dialogue, welcoming historians, linguists, literary scholars, sociologists, archaeologists, classicists, and researchers in related fields.

Please send abstracts of up to 300 words, as well as a biography of 50 words, to classicaldisplacement@gmail.com by 21st September 2018 EXTENDED DEADLINE October 5, 2018. We will let presenters know whether they are successful by 5th October 12th October 2018.

Organizers: Sam Agbamu, Rioghnach Sachs, Sam Thompson (King’s College London)

For further information, please visit: https://classicaldisplacement.wordpress.com

(CFP closed October 5, 2018)

 

 

2ND INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE IN ANCIENT DRAMA: THE FORGOTTEN THEATRE (IL TEATRO DIMENTICATO) #2

University of Turin, Italy: November, 28-30, 2018

Studies and discussions about classic fragmentary theatre and its modern staging.

The Centro Studi sul Teatro Classico (Centre for Studies on Classic Theatre) has scheduled for November 2018 its second academic conference for Professors, Young Researchers and Ph.D. Students of Humanities.

The conference The Forgotten Theatre aims at revitalizing the scientific interest in dramatic Greek and Latin texts, both transmitted and fragmentary, which have been long confined in restricted areas of scientific research and limited to few modern staging. The conference will host academics - Professors, Young Researchers and Ph.D. Students – who wish to contribute in cast new light on the forgotten theatre through their studies, reflections and experiences.

Themes discussed:
• Criticism, commentary, and constitutio textus of complete and fragmentary texts (comedy and tragedy);
• Reasonable attempts of reconstructions of incomplete tetralogies;
• Research on theatrical plots known for indirect tradition;
• Developments of theatrical plots between the Greek and Latin world;
• Influence of foreign theater traditions on the Greek and Roman theatre;
• Influence of other forms of camouflage art (dance, mime) on the development of the Greek and Latin theatre;
• New scenographic considerations based on the testimonies of internal captions, marginalia and scholia to the texts;
• New proposals for modern staging of ancient dramatic texts;
• Medieval, humanistic, modern and contemporary traditions of ancient drama.

In order to participate, the candidates are required to send an e-mail to teatro.classico@unito.it containing:
• an abstract (about 300 words) of the lecture they intend to give at the conference and the title;
• a brief curriculum vitae et studiorum which highlights the educational qualifications of the candidate and the university they are attending.

The candidacies may be submitted until 31st July 2018 -- EXTENDED DEADLINE 31st August 2018. Each lecture should be 20-25 minutes long, plus a few minutes for questions from the public and discussion. The lectures may be given in Italian or English. Within the month of August 2018, the scientific committee will publish the list of the lecturers whose contribution has been accepted.

Refunds for the lecturers coming from other countries than Italy will be quantified thereafter. The scientific committee will also consider publishing the proceedings of the conference on the second issue of Frammenti sulla Scena, the official scientific series of The Centro Studi sul Teatro Classico (University of Turin), directed by Professor Francesco Carpanelli and published by Editore dell'Orso of Alessandria.

Scientific committee: The exact composition of the Scientific Committee, chaired by the Director of the Centro Studi sul Teatro Classico, prof. Francesco Carpanelli, will be announced in April 2018.

Organization: The organization of the conference is entrusted to the Secretary of the Centro Studi sul Teatro Classico, dott. Luca Austa; for any information about the technical and organizational aspects of the event please contact him at teatro.classico@unito.it.

Call: http://www.teatroclassico.unito.it/it/content/cfp-ii-international-conference-ancient-drama-november-2018

(CFP closed August 31, 2018)

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December 2018

PRELIMINARY CONSIDERATIONS ON THE CORPUS CORANICUM CHRISTIANUM. THE QURAN IN TRANSLATION – A SURVEY OF THE STATE-OF-THE-ART

Freie Universität Berlin (Germany), December 5th – 7th, 2018

We are delighted to announce the Call for Papers for our workshop ‘Preliminary Considerations on the Corpus Coranicum Christianum. The Quran in Translation – A Survey of the State-of-the-Art’ at the Freie Universität Berlin (Germany), December 5th – 7th, 2018. In this workshop, we aim to lay the groundwork for an interdisciplinary research project, which will focus on comparing the different translations of the Quran made within Christian cultural backgrounds. The project will study the Quran and its reception from the Christian perspective by analyzing all Greek, Syriac, and Latin translations of the Quran from the 7th century CE until the Early Modern period. The keynote speech will be delivered by Professor Angelika Neuwirth, head of the project Corpus Coranicum (CC) at the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and Humanities. The workshop aims to map out the different scholars and research traditions dealing with varied translations of the Quran. In addition, it seeks to connect these experts and to facilitate the scientific exchange between the multitude of studies previously conducted in this field. Finally, the workshop will examine the possibilities of using methods in the Digital Humanities for building an open-access database for systematically collecting and presenting the material for further research.

The structure of the planned project will correspond with the languages that will be analyzed. The Corpus Coranicum Christianum (CCC) shall, in a first step, consist of the three subprojects: Corpus Coranicum Byzantinum (CCB), Corpus Coranicum Syriacum (CCS), and Corpus Coranicum Latinum (CCL). Papers for the workshop are welcome in one or more of the following four sections:

* Greek translations of the Quran (CCB)
* Syriac translations of the Quran (CCS)
* Latin translations of the Quran (CCL)
* Digital Humanities (DH)

The workshop is focused on interdisciplinary research, which will, the organizers hope, encourage fruitful discussions about the state-of-the-art of the field and highlight potential areas for future research cooperation. For this purpose, we welcome abstracts of up to 300 words, to be submitted in English by May 31st, 2018 to: corpus.coranicum.christianum@klassphil.fu-berlin.de. Abstracts should include your name, affiliation, position, the title of the proposed paper, your specific source(s) you want to work on, and a brief curriculum vitae. Please also indicate the preferred section (see above: CCB, CCS, CCL, DH). Notifications will be sent out in June 2018. Full papers should be submitted by 15th November, 2018. Limited funding will be available for accommodation and/or travel. Proposed workshop languages: English, German, Spanish, and French. Papers will be published as edited volume.

The project initiative Corpus Coranicum Christianum is financed by the Presidency of the Freie Universität Berlin. For further information about the structure of the planned project and for a more detailed Call for Papers, please visit our website. We are looking forward to welcoming you soon in Berlin!

Call: http://www.geisteswissenschaften.fu-berlin.de/we02/griechisch/byzantinistik/projekte/corpus-coranicum-christianum/workshop/index.html

(CFP closed May 31, 2018)

 

 

#CFP COMBAT STRESS AND THE PRE-MODERN WORLD

Manchester Metropolitan University: Friday 7th December, 2018

Since the genesis of ‘shell shock’, the pre-modern world has been used to aid our understanding of the psychological and moral injuries incurred during military service. From the turn of the millennium, there has been a surge of research that has tried to identify the symptomology of combat stress and post-traumatic stress in the source material, leading to the retrospective diagnosis of such prominent figures as: Achilles, Alexander the Great, Henry V, Samuel Pepys, to name but a few. This universalist approach has recently been challenged, giving birth to an important debate about the use of the modern PTSD model as a way to explore pre-modern combat, and post-combat, experiences. The aim of this one-day workshop is to bring together scholars from ancient, medieval, and early-modern history in order to examine the use of PTSD in the study of the pre-modern world and invigorate a cordial and lively debate within a friendly network.

We would like to invite papers of 20 minutes from postgraduates, ECRs, and established scholars working on ancient, medieval, or early-modern history, which might cover such topics as (but are not restricted to):

* The presence of combat stress in the written evidence and relevant case-studies.
* The experience of combat and military service.
* The use of historical precedents in the study of combat stress, PTSD, ‘shell shock’ and so forth.
* The dialogue between the disciplines of Psychology and History.
* The ‘PTSD in history’ debate and methodological considerations.
* Moral injury as an alternative historical model.
* PTSD and non-combatants: women, children, the elderly, the enslaved.

A title and 250 word abstract should be sent to Owen Rees at o.rees@mmu.ac.uk or Dr Jason Crowley j.crowley@mmu.ac.uk by Friday 26th October 2018. Postgraduate speakers and ECRs and warmly encouraged to submit a paper.

Call: https://listserv.liv.ac.uk/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind1809&L=CLASSICISTS&P=121165

 

 

SENSUAL REFLECTIONS: RE-THINKING THE ROLE OF THE SENSES IN THE GRECO-ROMAN WORLD

Faculty of Classics, University of Cambridge, UK: 8-9 December, 2018

Confirmed Keynote Speakers:
George Gazis (Durham University)
Emma-Jayne Graham (The Open University)
Katerina Ierodiakonou (University of Athens/Université de Genève)
Chiara Thumiger (University of Warwick/Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin)

The study of the classical past is currently experiencing a spatial and sensory turn, affecting the work of classicists, classical archaeologists, ancient philosophers and historians alike. Despite the growing number of ideas and approaches developed by individual specialists, so far the attempts to develop an interdisciplinary conversation on the matter have been limited. The aim of this conference is therefore to bring together scholars from a variety of disciplines and to create a lively and challenging setting for discussion of new methodological approaches to ancient senses.

The conference will be divided into four sessions, each focused on specific aspects of ancient senses and their study:

(i) ‘Sensing the world’ will explore some of the theories of sense-perception put forward in antiquity. The emphasis will be placed on some of the epistemological issues that follow from the different ways in which ancient philosophers explained the relation between the perceiver and the external world, e.g. on the kind of knowledge we acquire through our senses, and the phenomenon of misperception.

(ii) ‘Sensing ruins’ will explore the possibilities offered by sensorial approaches to the study of material culture in classical antiquity. We invite contributions engaging with all the aspects of the physicality of the ancient world and its reception and welcome proposals which seek to present the material in a sensorially engaging and non-traditional way.

(iii) ‘Sensing the body’ will investigate the involvement of the senses in ancient beliefs and theories about disease and the body. This session will be particularly devoted to exploring the connections between literature, medicine and philosophy in the Greco-Roman world, by focusing on their relations with the senses and the human body.

(iv) ‘Sensing beauty’ will broaden the discussion, debating the role of the senses in early aesthetic theory. While encouraging contributions on traditional themes, e.g. mimesis and the sublime, the organizers will give priority to papers that focus specifically on the role of sensorial perception in the theorising of beauty in antiquity, and on how the ‘sensorial turn’ in classical scholarship can deepen our understanding of the early philosophical engagement with beauty and art.

*We aim to publish the results as an edited volume in the Mind Association Occasional Series published by Oxford University Press. Speakers will present preliminary versions of articles to be published in the conference volume.

Submission Guidelines

We especially encourage academics in the early stages of their career to apply (including final-year PhD students), but also welcome proposals from established academics. Applicants are kindly invited to submit the following documents:

1. An anonymised abstract of no more than 500 words (papers should be suitable for 30 min presentations). Abstracts should include (i) the thesis of your paper; (ii) a clear presentation of the main argument you will put forward in support of that thesis; (iii) a brief explanation of the novelty of your argument/thesis; (iv) and an indication of how the argument/thesis fits within the current scholarship on the matter.

2. A separate cover sheet indicating (a) your name, (b) the title of your paper, (c) institutional affiliation, (d) contact details, and (e) the session you would like to be part of. We particularly encourage applications from underrepresented groups in academia. Please feel free to indicate in the cover sheet whether you are a member of such a group.

Deadlines: Proposals should be sent to the organisers (sensual.reflections2018@gmail.com) by 21 September 2018, 11:59pm. Selected applicants will be contacted by 1 October 2018 and will be expected to send a draft of their papers to circulate among speakers and attendees by 15 November 2018.

A limited number of bursaries (of around 70£) will be available for selected speakers to cover part of their travel expenses, but we encourage them to apply for bursaries from their home institutions. We are aiming to offer a limited number of bursaries to attendees too. Further details will be given at a later stage. The registration fee will be 25£ (covering welcome reception, coffee and lunches), and 15£ for graduate students.

The conference is made possible thanks to a generous grant from the Mind Association.

Please do not hesitate to contact us with any queries at sensual.reflections2018@gmail.com

The organisers:
Chiara Blanco (University of Cambridge)
Giacomo Savani (University of Leicester)
Rasmus Sevelsted (University of Cambridge)
Cristóbal Zarzar (University of Cambridge)

Call: https://philevents.org/event/show/64038

(CFP closed September 21, 2018)

 

 

THE ROMAN ART WORLD IN THE 18TH CENTURY AND THE BIRTH OF THE ART ACADEMY IN BRITAIN

The Accademia Nazionale di San Luca and the British School at Rome, Rome: December 10-11, 2018

The Accademia Nazionale di San Luca and the British School at Rome (BSR) invite submissions for papers for the conference The Roman Art World in the 18th Century and the Birth of the Art Academy in Britain, to be held in Rome between 10 and 11 December 2018. The conference will focus on the role of the Roman pedagogical model in the formation of the British academic art world in the long 18th century.

Even as Paris progressively dominated the modern art world during the 18th century, Rome retained its status as the ‘academy’ of Europe, attracting a vibrant international community of artists and architects. Their exposure to the Antique and the Renaissance masters was supported by a complex pedagogical system. The Accademia Nazionale di San Luca, the Capitoline Accademia del Nudo, the Concorsi Clementini, and numerous studios and offices, provided a network of institutions and a whole theoretical and educational model for the relatively young British art world, which was still striving to create its own modern system for the arts. Reverberations of the Roman academy system were felt back in Britain through initiatives in London such as the Great Queen Street Academy, the Duke of Richmond’s Academy, the Saint Martin’s Lane Academy and the Royal Society of Arts. But it was a broader national phenomenon too, inspiring the likes of the Foulis Academy in Glasgow and the Liverpool Society of Artists. The foundation of the Royal Academy of Arts in London in 1768 officially sanctioned the affirmation of the Roman model.

If past scholarship has concentrated mainly on the activities of British artists while in Rome, this conference wishes to address the process of intellectual migration, adaptation and reinterpretation of academic, theoretical and pedagogical principles from Rome back into 18th- century Britain. It responds to the rise of intellectual history, building on prevalent trends in the genealogy of knowledge and the history of disciplines, as well as the mobility and exchange of ideas and cultural translation across borders.

The conference welcomes diverse approaches to investigating the dissemination of the academic ideal from Rome to Britain. These might address, but are by no means limited to, the following topics:

• The impact of the Roman academic structure, theory and pedagogy on British art academies, artists’ studios and architects’ offices.

• The impact of art and architectural theory in Rome on the formation of a public discourse on art and architecture in Britain.

• The process of adaptation and reinterpretation of Roman theoretical and pedagogical principles to the British artistic and architectural context, and the extent to which British art academies developed new principles, absorbed the Roman model, or derived them from elsewhere.

• The role played by Roman and Italian artists and architects in the formation and structuring of the 18th-century British art academies and, in particular, of the Royal Academy of Arts.

• The presence and activities of British artists and architects in Roman studios, offices and academies and the presence of Italian artists in British academies.

• The role played by other relevant academies – such as those at Parma and Florence – on the formation of British artists and architects in relationship/opposition to the Roman model.

This conference will conclude a series of events celebrating the 250th anniversary of the foundation of the Royal Academy of Arts in London. It will also be part of a series of conferences and exhibitions focusing on the role of the Accademia Nazionale di San Luca in the spread of the academic ideal in Europe and beyond, inaugurated in 2016 with an exhibition and conference on the relationship between Rome and the French academy, held at the Accademia Nazionale di San Luca and at the Académie de France à Rome.

Please provide a concise title and abstract (250 words maximum) for a 20-minute paper. Send your proposal, with a current CV of no more than two pages, to humanities@bsrome.it. Proposals must be received by midnight, Monday 12 March 2018. Speakers will be notified of the committee’s decision in mid-April 2018. Travel grants will be available.

Organizers: Dr Adriano Aymonino, Professor Carolina Brook, Professor Gian Paolo Consoli, Dr Thomas-Leo True

Call: http://www.bsr.ac.uk/call-for-papers-the-roman-art-world-in-the-18th-century-and-the-birth-of-the-art-academy-in-britain

(CFP closed March 12, 2018)

 

 

AMPLIFYING ANTIQUITY: MUSIC AS CLASSICAL RECEPTION

Strand Campus, King’s College London: December 12-13, 2018

The departments of Classics, Music, and Comparative Literature at King’s College London are delighted to announce a call for papers for an upcoming conference: Amplifying Antiquity: Music as Classical Reception.

The focus of the conference is deliberately wide, and we welcome proposals to speak on any aspect of how the culture, history, and myth of the Greek and Roman worlds have influenced the music of the 17th-21st centuries. We hope that papers will demonstrate the scope for fresh work and new collaborations in this area.

Musical works addressed need not be conventionally viewed as part of the classical tradition. Papers might touch on topics such as: the use of antiquity in the invention of new musical genres and development of aesthetic priorities; the relationship between performative speech and song, past and present; the gendering of ancient voices in modern productions; the social contexts of musical commissioning and performance; the conservative and radical political potential in music inspired by the classical world.

Speakers already confirmed include Sina Dell’Anno (Basel), Edith Hall (KCL), Wendy Heller (Princeton), Sarah Hibberd (Bristol), and Stephanie Oade (Oxford).

We are currently awaiting the outcome of applications to support the funding of this conference, and plan to cover at least the expenses of each speaker's stay in London. While King’s does not have on-site childcare, every effort will be made to accommodate speakers with caring commitments.

Please send abstracts (no more than 300 words) to amplifyingantiquity@gmail.com, by July 9th. Any questions can be directed either to amplifyingantiquity@gmail.com, or to the organisers.

Organisers: Emily Pillinger (emily.pillinger@kcl.ac.uk) and Miranda Stanyon (miranda.stanyon@kcl.ac.uk)

Call: https://listserv.liv.ac.uk/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind1806&L=CLASSICISTS&P=38992

(CFP closed July 9, 2018)

 

 

TRANSLATING GREEK TRAGEDY IN 16TH-CENTURY EUROPE

St Hilda’s College (Oxford) - Vernon Harcourt Room: December 14, 2018

Programme:

10.00-10.30 Registration and Coffee (Vernon Harcourt Room)
10.30-11.00 Welcome from Fiona Macintosh and the organizers; presentation of APGRD Translating Ancient Drama project by Cécile Dudouyt

11.00-12.00 Southern Europe I – Chair: Sarah Knight (Leicester)
Elia Borza (Université Catholique de Louvain) – Neo-Latin Sophocles; an Overview of the Neo-Latin Translations of Sophocles in Renaissance Europe
Giovanna Di Martino (Oxford) – Theatre Translation and Aeschylus in Early Modern Italy: three case studies 12.00-12.15 Coffee Break

12.15-1.15 Southern Europe II – Chair: Blair Hoxby (Stanford)
Claudia Cuzzotti (Independent) – The Hecuba by Michelangelo the Younger (1568-1647): translation and adaptation of Greek tragedy in the Italian Renaissance
Luísa Resende (Coimbra) - Sophocles in sixteenth-century Portugal. Aires Vitória’s Tragédia del Rei Agaménom
1.15-2.30 Lunch

2.30-3.50 Northern Europe I – Chair: Blair Hoxby (Stanford)
Malika Bastin-Hammou (Université Grenoble Alpes) – Translating Greek (para)tragedy in the Renaissance
Thomas Baier (Würzburg) – Camerarius on Greek Tragedy
Angelica Vedelago (Padua) – Thomas Watson’s Antigone: the didacticism of Neo-Latin academic drama
3.50-4.10 Coffee Break

4.10-5.30 Northern Europe II – Chair: Tiphaine Karsenti (Paris X)
Cécile Dudouyt (Paris 13) - Translating and Play-writing: Robert Garnier’s patchwork technique
Tristan Alonge (Université de la Réunion) - Praising the King, Raising the Dauphin: an unknown sixteenth-century French translation from Euripides recovered
Tanya Pollard (CUNY) – Translating and Transgendering Greek Heroines in Early Modern England

5.30-6.30 Plenary led by Stuart Gillespie (Glasgow)

6.30-7.45 Drinks Reception (Senior Common Room): book launch of Epic Performances from the Middle Ages into the Twenty-First Century, eds. Fiona Macintosh, Justine McConnell, Stephen Harrison and Claire Kenward (OUP 2018)

Register: https://translatinggreektr.wixsite.com/sixteenthcentury

For more information: giovanna.dimartino@classics.ox.ac.uk

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January 2019

[PANEL] ANCIENT DRAMA, NEW WORLD

Society for Classical Studies Annual Meeting - San Diego: January 3-6, 2019

Sponsored by the Committee on Ancient and Modern Performance

Organizers: Anna Uhlig, (asuhlig@ucdavis.edu), University of California, Davis & Al Duncan, (al.duncan@unc.edu), The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Research Fellow, University of the Free State

The performance of ancient drama, whether in updated stagings or more radically adapted variations, represents one of the most significant influences on contemporary views of the ancient world. As Helene Foley and others have shown, the “reimagining” of ancient drama in the New World has a long and fascinating history, and one that continues to be written. The recent flurry of scholarly work on the performance of ancient drama in the Americas attests to the range and complexity of new-world engagement with Greece and Rome. Landmark studies include Foley’s Reimagining Greek Tragedy on the American Stage (2012) and the Oxford Handbook of Greek Drama in the Americas (2015) among diverse other publications. In the years since the publication of these volumes, ancient drama has continued to demonstrate its ability to speak to a changing New World, whether in Harrison David Rivers’ And She Would Stand Like This (2017), a transgender version of Euripides’ Trojan Women, Bryan Doerries’ evolving “Theater of War” Productions (2009-present), or Elise Kermani’s juxtaposition of contemporary and ancient in Iphigenia: Book of Change (2016). In many ways, theater artists in the Americas are once again redefining our relationships with ancient Greek and Roman culture.

In light of the overall goal of the Sesquicentennial Program to celebrate the past and future of Classical Studies in the Americas, this panel will focus on the dynamic forms that ancient drama has taken in new-world performances. This rich and still-unfolding history provides a powerful window on how the performance of classical drama constitutes a vital channel through which the future of Classics has taken—and continues to take—shape. As theater has long been recognized as a bellwether within our discipline, a goal of this panel is to highlight emergent trends in new-world theater that may presage future turns in Classical Studies as a whole.

We invite submissions on any aspect of the performance of ancient drama in the Americas, but are especially eager for contributions that focus on the cultural or political immediacy of ancient drama as demonstrated in staged productions from the last decade or so. Possible areas of focus include, but are not limited to:

* How does a synchronic approach facilitate our understanding of ancient drama within an interconnected world?
* How does the shared history of colonialism and/or slavery in the Americas shape approaches to ancient drama?
* What similarities/differences are found in the performance/adaptation of ancient drama in distinct linguistic communities of the Americas (e.g. Spanish, English, Portuguese, French)?
* How have recent changes in social or economic conditions in the Americas found form in the performance/adaptation of ancient drama?
* How are contentious issues of borders, identity, nationality, and culture reflected in the performance/adaptation of ancient drama in the Americas?
* How are shifting discourses on gender, sexuality, and race making themselves felt in the performance/adaptation of ancient drama?

The session will conclude with a response to the papers by Helene Foley.

Please send anonymous abstracts following SCS guidelines (http://apaclassics.org/annual-meeting/guidelines-authors-of-abstracts) by email to Timothy Wutrich (trw14@case.edu), not to the panel organizers. Review of abstracts will begin 1 March 2018. The deadline for submission is 15 March 2018.

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/2019/150/call-abstracts-ancient-drama-new-world

(CFP closed March 15, 2018)

 

 

[PANEL] CLASSICAL & EARLY MODERN EPIC: COMPARATIVE APPROACHES & NEW PERSPECTIVES

Society for Classical Studies Annual Meeting - San Diego: January 3-6, 2019

The Society for Early Modern Classical Reception (SEMCR) invites proposals for papers to be delivered at the 2019 meeting of the Society for Classical Studies in San Diego. For its fourth panel, SEMCR invites abstracts on the subject of “Classical and Early Modern Epic: Comparative Approaches and New Perspectives”. In particular, we welcome papers offering reassessments of the current state of the field from cross-cultural and cross-temporal perspectives, or proposing new approaches to the connections between classical and early modern epic using methodologies from philology, digital humanities, cognitive studies, visual studies, or world literature.

In the shadow of a rising nationalism, epic poetry has taken on an ever greater importance through its mediation of national identity and as a focal point of reference and contestation. Even within rarefied scholarly discussions, the study of the genre, like epic itself, can appear to dominate other material, whether less canonical genres or non-Western epic. While the genealogical bonds between classical and early modern epic can seem to strengthen national ideologies and academic conventions, however, the content of the poems often works against such assumptions. Moreover, increasing diversity in research methods and scope, especially through collaboration, enables the scholarly community to renew the study of epic in more expansive and imaginative ways. Our panel aims, therefore, to reflect on the reception of Greco-Roman epic in early modernity partly as a topic in its own right, and partly as a means of understanding more general issues of theory, practice, and canonicity in literature and culture at large.

Proposals responding to recent developments in the scholarship might address, but are not limited to, one of the following questions:

* In light of recent work by Mazzotta, Ramachandran, Laird, and others, how might attention to worldmaking, post-colonial thought, and classical reception in the New World reframe our understanding of the relationship between ancient and early modern epic?

* Does the study of the relationship between classical and early modern epic have anything to gain from comparison with non-Western material, e.g., the Indic tradition? More generally, what are the advantages and disadvantages of analysing these traditions in terms of genealogy, ecology (cf. Beecroft), cosmopolitanism (cf. Pollock), or other systemic relationships?

* What light can cross-disciplinary approaches, especially those using computational tools (cf. Coffee and Bernstein) or cognitive models (cf. Jaén and Simon), shed on continuities and disjunctions between ancient and early modern forms of the genre?

* How did the idea of epic change as a genre during the early modern period, in particular given the different transmission histories of classical epics, especially works in ancient Greek? How might the growing attention to neo-Latin literature affect the fields of epic and/or reception studies?

* Are there developments in the aesthetics of a particular period that shed light on goings-on elsewhere? Besides substantial interest in the sublime (Cheney) and the mock-epic (Rawson), recent work has also focused on the quotidian (Grogan). More generally, what comparative understanding of epic can be gleaned from a study of contemporary critics and theorists, e.g., Horace or Tasso?

* What areas of research in early modern epic might benefit from the contributions of classicists without an extensive background in the field, and vice versa?

We are committed to creating a congenial and collaborative forum for the infusion of new ideas into classics, and hence welcome abstracts that are exploratory in nature as well as abstracts of latter-stage research. Above all, we aim to show how the field of early modern classical reception can bear on a wide range of literary and cultural study, and to dispel the notion of an intimidating barrier to entry.

Abstracts of no more than 400 words, suitable for a 15-20 minute presentation, should be sent as an email attachment to Pramit Chaudhuri (pramit.chaudhuri@austin.utexas.edu). All persons who submit abstracts must be SCS members in good standing. The abstracts will be judged anonymously: please do not identify yourself in any way on the abstract page.

Proposals must be received by February 19th, 2018.

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/2019/150/call-abstracts-classical-and-early-modern-epic

(CFP closed February 19, 2018 EXTENDED DEADLINE March 1, 2018)

 

 

[PANEL] CLASSICS & SOCIAL JUSTICE AFFILIATED GROUP: WHO "OWNS" CLASSICS? WHO IS THE FIELD OF CLASSICS FOR? DEFINING THE FIELD/DIVERSIFYING THE FIELD.

Society for Classical Studies Annual Meeting - San Diego: January 3-6, 2019

Chair: Amy Pistone (apistone@nd.edu) and Kassandra Miller (millerk3@union.edu)

Many initiatives, many possibilities come to mind when we think of Classics and Social Justice. But as we pursue these initiatives, or even before, an important early task for us, is that of self-reflection. Classics traditionally has been the preserve of elites, and has served to exclude individuals and groups from power, institutions, and resources thereby perpetuating their definition as inferior. Let us examine and confront this element of our history carefully, and more particularly our behaviors. Is Classics white? In the light of the appropriation of classical themes and motifs by the alt right, we need to think about how we ourselves have presented the field so as to render such (mis)appropriations possible. At the same time "ownership" of classics has always been contested--and the classics deployed-- by those very same groups who have been defined as outsiders. What are we doing when we say “classics for all” or teach these ancient materials to members of marginalized groups? Why do we do what we do?

We solicit 650-word abstracts by Feb. 20, 2018, for 15-20 minute papers. Paper topics might include but are by no means limited to questions such as the following: the "gatekeeping" and imperialist traditions of classics; the pedagogy of canons and unchanging tradition; the challenges from perceived outsiders to the discipline, for instance working class individuals, people of color, women. How do such individuals fare in our national meetings? Or in our discipline?

Please submit anonymous abstracts of less than 650 words to Kaitlyn Boulding (boulding@UW.EDU).

Call: https://classicssocialjustice.wordpress.com/2018/01/13/cfp-society-for-classical-studies-2019/

(CFP closed February 20, 2018)

 

 

[PANEL] GLOBAL FEMINISM AND THE CLASSICS

Society for Classical Studies Annual Meeting - San Diego: January 3-6, 2019

WCC Sponsored Panel. Chairs: Andrea Gatzke (SUNY-New Paltz) and Jeremy LaBuff (Northern Arizona University)

Global/transnational feminism is a framework that challenges the universalizing tendencies of Western feminism, and works toward a more expansive appreciation of the diversity inherent to the experiences of women and sexual minorities across the globe. It accomplishes this by taking into consideration the wide variation of cultural, economic, religious, social, and political factors that differentially impact women in different places. Yet the potential utility of this concept to the discipline of classical studies remains largely untapped. For all of the modifications and corrections made to Foucault’s History of Sexuality, the Greco-Roman world’s position as ancestor to the Modern West too often frames how we situate the study of gender and sexuality in antiquity. Global/transnational feminism offers ways to make the discipline more inclusive by transcending this ancient-modern comparison and further contextualizing classical phenomena through contemporary cross-cultural study and consideration of how gender and sexuality might intersect with other social categories like ethnicity or class. Such approaches can help us identify important connections and differences between distinct cultures, but perhaps more importantly, can serve to establish the value and limitations of the theories and methodologies we implement in studying gender and sexuality.

This panel seeks to provide a venue for advancing discussions of gender and sexuality in classical antiquity in both scholarship and the classroom through the lens of global/transnational feminism. Among the questions we hope to explore are:

* How can we make fruitful comparisons between Greek and Roman constructions of gender and sexuality and those of other ancient societies, whether neighboring and interacting (e.g., Celtic, Egyptian, Persian) or disparate (China, Japan, South Asia, etc.)?
* How might a global/transnational feminist approach help us and our students more critically compare ancient constructions of gender and sexuality to our own modern ones?
* How might an emphasis on intersectionality complicate our understanding of the diverse experiences of women and sexual minority groups in antiquity?
* How does Western feminism limit our ability to understand and analyze concepts of gender and sexuality in antiquity?
* What does a global/transnational feminist approach mean for our relationship to the ancient past, more broadly conceived?
* We solicit papers from both scholarly and pedagogical perspectives that consider the above and related questions regarding the study of gender and/or sexuality in the ancient world from a global/transnational perspective.

Abstracts of ca. 450 words, suitable to a 15-20 presentation, should be sent as a .pdf file to Martha Teck (teckm@newpaltz.edu). Please do not identify yourself in any way in the abstract itself so that all submitted abstracts can be evaluated anonymously. Please follow the formatting guidelines for abstracts that appear on the SCS website: https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/guidelines-authors-abstracts. All persons who submit abstracts must be SCS or AIA members in good standing, and all proposals must be received by March 1, 2018. Any questions about the panel should be directed to the organizers.

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/2017/150/call-abstracts-global-feminism-and-classics

(CFP closed March 1, 2018)

 

 

[PANEL] LITERARY TRANSLATION OF GREEK AND LATIN (SINCE 1869)

Society for Classical Studies Annual Meeting - San Diego: January 3-6, 2019

Organizers: SCS Committee on Translations of Classical Authors

From Livius Andronicus to the multifarious translation landscape of the twenty-first century, the re-creation of classic works in new languages has brought ancient literature to new audiences and new cultural contexts.

This panel seeks papers that focus on the art of literary translation. For our society’s sesquicentennial, we especially welcome papers that address translation into English since 1869.

All translation is interpretation: Textual decisions drive interpretations, yet interpretive stances also drive textual decisions. Translation is an especially intimate and visible active reading in which the reader of the source language work becomes the writer of the English work.

Possible areas of focus include, but are not limited to:

* How literary translations of single authors have changed over time.
* Trends in literary translation
* Translation in times of crisis
* The status of translation in classics
* How translation engages with scholarship
* The responsibilities of the translator
* Theories of and approaches to translation
* Political or cultural use of translation

The Committee on Translations of Classical Authors is in the process of producing a searchable database bibliography of all translations of Greek and Latin authors translated from 1869 (and ongoing) initially in English, French, German, Italian, and Spanish. Grand Valley State University developed the Tiresias database, before transferring it to UC-Irvine, who has agreed to host the project at the International Center for Writing and Translation.

Abstracts for papers should be submitted electronically as Word documents by January 31, 2018 to Donald Mastronarde (djmastronarde@berkeley.edu), preferably with the subject heading “abstract_translation_SCS2019”. All abstracts will be judged anonymously and so should not reveal the author’s name, but the email should provide name, abstract title, and affiliation. Abstracts should be 650 words or fewer and should follow the guidelines for individual abstracts (https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/guidelines-authors-abstracts), except that works cited should be put at the end of the document, not in a separate text box.

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/2019/150/call-abstracts-literary-translation-greek-and-latin-1869

(CFP closed January 31, 2018)

 

 

[PANEL] MOISA (SCS 2019): MUSIC AND THE DIVINE

Society for Classical Studies Annual Meeting - San Diego: January 3-6, 2019

Many literary and philosophical sources throughout antiquity attest the view that music serves as a connection between human and the supernatural realities. The concept of music as a “gift of the gods,” also applicable to instruments and divine (or divinely inspired) musicians, already points at this relationship. From the Pythagoreans to Aristides Quintilianus and beyond, cosmological speculations are frequently aligned with the structure and dynamics of the human soul and described in musical terms. Hence the need of a deeper inquiry about the relationship between music and the divine.

Possible questions to be investigated and topics to discuss include (but are not limited to):
* What are historical, psychological, philosophical, and theological reasons for the perception that music is something divine, which surpasses what is properly human?
* Greek and Roman mythology is full of stories where gods or divine figures are related to or the origin and practice of music as such, instruments, tunes, practices, etc. What does divine patronage reveal about the character of music and its impact on human life?
* The “divinely inspired” musician: origin, role, and development of the concept of musical genius.
* Dionysian “frenzy”: how does the “dark side” of music become associated with divinities? How is this represented in other cultural traditions?
* Human music as a competition or rebellion against the divine (for instance, the stories of Marsyas or Orpheus).
* Cosmology and mathematical musicology: to what degree can modern science support the parallelism between musical and cosmic processes as first described by the Pythagoreans and still thoroughly developed by Kepler? How does such “ideal” music relate to “real” music?
* Contributions of individual classical authors or schools: what are the various views on the relationship between music and creation, and how do they compare? How are these theories reflected and further developed in post-classical traditions?
* Music as mediation between the human and the divine.
* Is the numinous character of music particular, or is it found similarly in other art forms?
* How do ethnomusicological findings support – or question – the idea of a universal notion of music being a privileged link between the human sphere and the divine?
* Is there a continuity or rather a discontinuity between the classical and the Christian (Western or Eastern) view on the role of music in worship or on its divine character?

In an effort to showcase the best papers and the most innovative research in the field of ancient music, we also welcome abstracts that deal with interdisciplinary aspects of Greek and Roman music and its cultural heritage within the framework of the panel theme.

Abstracts for 20-minute papers to be presented at the 2019 SCS annual meeting should observe the instructions for the format of individual abstracts that appear on the SCS web site. The deadline for submission is March 9th, 2018, and all prospective presenters should be SCS members in good standing at the time of submission. Please address your abstract to gurds@missouri.edu and any question related to the panel to akramarz@legionaries.org. In accordance with SCS regulations, all abstracts for papers will be read anonymously by two referees.

Call: http://www.fasticongressuum.com/single-post/2018/02/22/CALL-09032018-PANEL-16-Music-and-the-Divine-MOISA-at-SCS-2019---San-Diego-CA-USA

(CFP closed March 9, 2018)

 

 

[WORKSHOP] THEORIZING AFRICANA RECEPTIONS

Society for Classical Studies Annual Meeting - San Diego: January 3-6, 2019

For our inaugural workshop at the annual meeting of the Society for Classical Studies, we invite abstracts for papers that develop trans-historical and transnational models of Africana reception. Contributions will be pre-circulated and then discussed at the 2019 SCS meeting in San Diego.

As Classical Reception Studies has burgeoned, existing models of appropriation, creativity, and dialogue have struggled to capture the complexity of the relationship between classical works and their receptions. For example, studies often focus exclusively on one temporal point over the other, trace a direct line of influence from source to target, or hierarchize in such a way that source works become the privileged creative inspiration to a later 'political' manifestation. This is not just a scholarly problem. Artists themselves have rejected attempts to categorize their refigurations without acknowledging their idiosyncratic perspectives: as Romare Bearden said, 'we must remember that people other than Spaniards can appreciate Goya, people other than Chinese can appreciate a Sung landscape, and people other than Negroes can appreciate a Benin bronze...an artist is an art lover who finds that in all the art that he sees, something is missing: to put there what he feels is missing becomes the center of his life's work' (S. Patton, Memory and Metaphor 1991: 31).

Classicists have already begun to find new paths forward. Drawing on the work of Deleuze and Guattari, Lorna Hardwick has argued for utilizing a rhizomatic network of classical connections that recognizes multiple, non-hierarchical points of entry ("Fuzzy Connections" 2011: 43). Emily Greenwood has further developed Hardwick's classical connectivity model by advocating the 'omni-localism' of classical works and of their Africana Receptions ("Omni-Local Classical Receptions" 2013). Striation or layering, as discussed in Deep Classics (Butler, ed. 2016) and "The Reception of Classical Texts in the Renaissance" (Gaisser 2002) respectively, has also been proposed as an alternative metaphor for conceptualizing the varied processes of reception.

To that end we seek papers that go beyond a focus on one point of entry, privileged viewpoint or implied 'tradition' into the network of classical connections and offer a distinctive methodological contribution, a case study of a model through multiple receptions, or a novel theoretical analysis.

Proposals may address (but are not limited to) the following sub-disciplines: intellectual history; literature; visual art and performance studies; music; political activism; and education.

Eos is committed to creating a congenial and collaborative forum for the infusion of new ideas into Classics, and hence welcomes abstracts that are exploratory in nature as well as abstracts of latter-stage research. Above all, we aim to create a supportive environment for scholars of all stages working on Africana Receptions of Greco-Roman antiquity.

Abstracts of no more than 400 words should be sent as an email attachment to cfp@eosafricana.org. All persons who submit abstracts must be SCS members in good standing. The abstracts will be judged anonymously: please do not identify yourself in any way on the abstract page. Proposals must be received by February 23rd, 2018.

Website: http://eosafricana.org/posts/theorizing-africana-receptions/

(CFP closed February 23, 2018 EXTENDED DEADLINE March 2, 2018)

 

 

[PANEL] TURNING QUEER: QUEERNESS AND THE TROPE

Society for Classical Studies Annual Meeting - San Diego: January 3-6, 2019

The Lambda Classical Caucus invites abstracts for papers that investigate relationships between tropes and queerness in the ancient Mediterranean. Ancient and modern scholars have enumerated and explored tropes in visual arts, language, literature, politics, and other parts of ancient cultures. A trope may be “a figure which consists in using a word or a phrase in a sense other than that which is proper to it” (OED), such as a metaphor, or a theme or device used commonly in a particular style, genre, or discourse, such as the lament of the exclusus amator, and it may also be thought of in its root sense: a turning. We understand queerness broadly as questioning, ignoring, resisting, or in other ways not conforming with norms of gender, sex, sexuality, and/or erotics in a society. We welcome submissions on tropes and queerness in any part of an ancient Mediterranean culture or its later reception. We hope that, by examining ideas of turning, figurative representation, and commonly used themes or devices in relation to queer modes of non-conformity, this panel will reveal new dimensions of tropes and queerness.

Possible topics include but are not limited to the following:

How have tropes been used to represent queer people and queerness?
* Have people tried to control or limit non-conformity with tropes?
* How have non-conforming people found empowerment in tropes? Have they used tropes to understand themselves? To question norms? To communicate with each other?
* How does queerness interact with a particular trope or with an idea of a trope?
* How have modern queers troped cultures of the ancient Mediterranean or interacted with tropes of the ancient Mediterranean?

Please email abstracts for 20-minute papers to by February 1, 2018. Abstracts may be up to 500 words (not including works cited). Please submit abstracts as anonymized PDF’s, and include 1) the author’s name and 2) contact information and 3) the title of the proposed paper in the text of the email. Membership in the Society for Classical Studies is required for participation in this panel. Please email any questions to David Wray at dlwray@uchicago.edu, Hannah Mason at hannahzm@usc.edu, and Rob Matera at materar@beloit.edu.

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/2019/150/call-abstracts-turning-queer

(CFP closed February 1, 2018)

 

 

[PANEL] WRITING THE HISTORY OF EPIGRAPHY & EPIGRAPHERS

Society for Classical Studies Annual Meeting - San Diego: January 3-6, 2019

The American Society of Greek and Latin Epigraphy invites submissions for a panel at the 2019 Annual Meeting of the Society for Classical Studies in San Diego. The history of epigraphy as a discipline stretches back to antiquity itself. In the same manner that Herodotus used inscriptions in order to list the temple inventories from Delphi and Delos and Suetonius appears to have drawn on the myriad inscriptions that dotted the Roman Forum, modern epigraphers continue to publish, interpret, and interweave epigraphic remains today. Although the focus is normally on the ancient content of these epigraphic remains, this panel turns its focus on the epigraphers themselves.

As the Society for Classical Studies looks back on 150 years of its existence as an academic organization in 2019, epigraphers should similarly take a moment to reflect on the evolution of our field. From the Rosetta Stone to the Vindolanda Tablets, behind every great inscription is a great woman, man, and sometimes an entire archaeological team. We often contextualize inscriptions in their original time and provenance as a means of understanding the context and historical milieu in which they were written, yet understanding the motives, biases, and ethics of an epigrapher are similarly enlightening. Moreover, the role of the epigrapher as both historian and philologist is extensive. Whether it be Louis Robert’s (1904-1985) and his wife Jeanne’s publication of the Bulletin épigraphique from 1938 to 1984 or Joyce Reynolds’ publication of The inscriptions of Roman Tripolitania in 1952, epigraphers have helped to influence classics, ancient history, and digital humanities in many meaningful ways.

The main objective of this panel is to explore broadly the relationship between classical antiquity and the epigrapher. This might include but is not limited to how ancient and early medieval writers used epigraphic evidence, how Renaissance antiquarians drew on classical epigraphy in order to create new fonts for the printing press, the impact of German scholars publishing over 250,000 inscriptions in the Corpus Inscriptionum Latinarum and the Inscriptiones Graecae from the latter half of the 19th century up until the present. The role of epigraphers in shaping the current state of digital humanities today is of equal import. Histories of epigraphers dedicated to working with ancient Near Eastern, Hebrew, Greek, Roman, Syriac, Etruscan, and any other language inscribed within the ancient Mediterranean world are welcome to apply.

Abstracts will be evaluated anonymously by members of the ASGLE Executive Committee and external readers, and should not be longer than 650 words (bibliography excluded): please follow the SCS “Guidelines for Authors of Abstracts.” All Greek should either be transliterated or employ a Unicode font. The Abstract should be sent electronically as a Word file, along with a PDF of the Submission Form by March 3, 2018 to Sarah E. Bond at sarah-bond@uiowa.edu.

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/2019/150/call-abstracts-writing-history-epigraphy-and-epigraphers

(CFP closed March 3, 2018)

 

 

#CFP ANTIQUE WORLDS - MODERN PERSPECTIVES

Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg, Germany: January 18-19, 2019

Although the scientific knowledge gained in humanistic and cultural research is generally theory-based, the explicit and reflective use of different and disparate theory-concepts has only in recent years found it´s way into the field of classical studies. The so called 'cultural turn', that happened in the early 90s of the last century, can be marked as a starting point, as it led to an increased development and use of cultural studies-theories.

This movement also reached the different disciplines of classical studies, in which henceforward there can be witnessed a steadily increased use and development of these cultural studies-key concepts. Now theories, such as the 'Material-Agency Theory' or 'Actor-Network Theory', that already have been used for some time in the English-speaking regions, make their way into classical studies-investigations around here and complement for instance spatial-sociological or media-theoretically studies, whose potential already has been discussed for some time. But what about the concrete applicability and reflection of those methods and theories, that at first seem to be outside the subject area? How to utilize certain theoretical concepts for one's own questioning and material? And are there any adjustments to those theoretical concepts necessary, in order to assure their fruitful use? These and further questions shall be elaborated in this Barcamp 'Antique Worlds - Modern Perspectives'!

The main focus of this Barcamp is to discuss these questions in an interdisciplinary context: There will not only be the classical conference format with talks and following discussions but also more intensive debates, that will be held in smaller groups after short keynote-speeches. The papers shall present and discuss different theory-concepts and show how they can be used for certain questionings and how exactly they are being applied 'in praxi' on different matters – both of textual and material nature. The paper is expected to point out, how the use of the theory offers new insight.

There is neither limitation to specific theories, nor periods, cultures, or material. The theory-concepts being presented can either be ones, that are already well known and have been extensively discussed for quite a while or innovative and so far in the German-speaking research field mostly unknown concepts and ideas.

This Barcamp addresses PhD students from all disciplines within the field of classical studies. We are looking forward to abstracts in either German or English that do not exceed 400 words. The talk is restricted to 25 minutes followed by a 15-minute discussion.

Please send your proposal for papers and short academic CV to us by 15th October 2018: info@antike-welten-freiburg.de.

Cost-sharing is subject to funding.

Organisation: Working Group “Antike Welten – Moderne Perspektiven” of the Graduate School 'Humanities' at the University of Freiburg

Website: https://www.antike-welten-freiburg.de

Call: https://www.antike-welten-freiburg.de/?page_id=38#A1

 

 

ILIAS LATINA – INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP

Erlangen, Germany: January 24-25, 2019

The Ilias Latina has been one of the reference texts of the Homeric poem until the rediscovery of Greek in the West. After the richly commented edition by Scaffai (1997) and the translation in French with a brief commentary by Fry (2014), the aim of this international Workshop is to focus on this peculiar cultural product.

We warmly encourage PhD students, Post-docs and early-career researchers to present papers of 20 minutes in length. Proposals may focus on one of the following topics:

a)metaphrastic devices and the comparison with the Greek model
b)the text and the manuscript tradition
c)the Ilias Latina in the literary context of the Neronian age
d)its reception, starting from Late Antiquity.

We welcome abstracts of up to 350 words, to be submitted per email by July 31th 2018, including brief curriculum vitae.

Proposed workshop languages: English, Italian, German, and French.

A flat-rate reimbursement of travel and accommodation expenses is offered.

Confirmed invited speakers: Anton BIERL (Basel), Caterina CARPINATO (Venezia), Maria J. FALCONE (Erlangen), Thomas GÄRTNER (Köln-Bonn), Gerlinde HUBER-REBENICH (Bern), Christiane REITZ (Rostock), Christoph SCHUBERT (Erlangen).

Public evening lecture: Maurizio BETTINI (Siena), on the cultural meaning of translation.

Contacts:
Maria Jennifer FALCONE: maria.jennifer.falcone@fau.de
Christoph SCHUBERT: christoph.schubert@fau.de

Call: https://www.mommsen-gesellschaft.de/call-for-papers/2067-ilias-latina-internationaler-workshop-erlangen-24-25-januar-2019

(CFP closed July 31, 2018)

 

 

GLACIE CIRCUMDATUS UROR – DER NEULATEINISCHE PETRARKISMUS

Einladung zur Teilnahme an einer internationalen Tagung an der Universität Bonn: January 24-26, 2019

Der Petrarkismus hat die volkssprachliche europäische Lyrik der Frühen Neuzeit entscheidend geprägt. Der Einfluss auf die frühneuzeitliche lateinische Literatur ist dabei bislang allenfalls konstatiert und vereinzelt besprochen, aber nur sporadisch in größerem Zusammenhang untersucht worden. Explizite Übersetzungen, wie etwa Nicolas Bourbons lateinische Übertragung von RVF 134 („Pace non trovo“), der sich das Zitat im Veranstaltungstitel verdankt, sind jedoch in der neulateinischen Liebesdichtung des gesamten frühneuzeitlichen Europas ebenso zu finden wie subtile sprachlich-formale, strukturelle und konzeptionelle Bezugnahmen auf das petrarkistische Modell.

Dem neulateinischen Petrarkismus kommt im Vergleich zu den nationalsprachlichen Petrarkismen aus zwei Gründen eine Sonderstellung zu: Zum einen steht das Neulateinische in einem besonderen Nahverhältnis zur lateinischen Literatur der Antike. Hierdurch ist mit starken sprachlichen, motivischen und inhaltlichen Interferenzen zwischen dem Petrarkismus und Modellen antiker (Liebes-)Dichtung zu rechnen. Die zweite besondere Eigenart des neulateinischen Petrarkismus liegt im soziokulturellen ,Sitz im Leben‘ des Lateinischen, das in der Frühen Neuzeit als paneuropäische lingua franca fungierte. Die neulateinische Literatur oszilliert hierdurch zwischen Regionalität und Internationalität, sie interagiert mit regional unterschiedlichen Kontexten und kann gleichzeitig international rezipiert werden.

Die Tagung möchte sich nun erstmals gezielt dem Phänomen des neulateinischen Petrarkismus widmen und in Fortsetzung der Arbeiten Scorsones 2004 und Cintis 2006 wesentliche Spielarten der Petrarkismus-Aneignung in der lateinischen Poesie der Frühen Neuzeit diskutieren. Es soll dabei insbesondere auch nach Gemeinsamkeiten und Unterschieden zwischen dem neulateinischen und volkssprachlichen Petrarkismus gefragt werden.

Den Vortragenden können die Kosten für Anreise und Übernachtung erstattet werden. Eine Veröffentlichung der Beiträge im Anschluss an die Tagung ist geplant.

Für Vorträge von ca. 30 Minuten werden Themenvorschläge zum neulateinischen Petrarkismus in Europa, insbesondere aber in England, Skandinavien, Osteuropa, Spanien und Portugal – vorzugsweise als Email-Attachment – bis zum 15.06.2018 erbeten an: Alexander Winkler (a.winkler@uni-bonn.de). Der Themenformulierung sollte ein kurzes Exposé (max. 300 Wörter) beigefügt sein.

Call: https://www.philologie.uni-bonn.de/de/medneolat/nlat-petrarkismus

(CFP closed June 15, 2018)

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February 2019

AUSTRALASIAN SOCIETY FOR CLASSICAL STUDIES 40TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE

University of New England, Armidale (NSW): February 4-7, 2019.

CFP: http://www.ascs.org.au/news/ascs40_call_for_papers.html. Abstracts due by: July 31, 2018.

Conference website: http://www.une.edu.au/about-une/faculty-of-humanities-arts-social-sciences-and-education/school-of-humanities/australasian-society-for-classical-studies

ASCS: http://www.ascs.org.au/

(CFP closed July 31, 2018)

 

 

#CFP COMPLAINT AND GRIEVANCE: LITERARY TRADITIONS

National Library of New Zealand/Victoria University of Wellington, NZ: February 14-15, 2019

‘O woe is me / To have seen what I have seen, see what I see’. Shakespeare’s Ophelia, wooed and cast aside by her one-time lover, Hamlet, amplifies her woe in the open-ended expression of grief that characterises complaint, a rhetorical mode that proliferates from the poetry of Ovid to the Bible, from the Renaissance to the modern day.

This symposium explores the literature of complaint and grievance, centring on the texts of the Renaissance but welcoming contributions from related areas. Shakespeare (A Lover’s Complaint) and Spenser (Complaints) are central authors of Renaissance complaint, but who else wrote complaint literature, why, and to what effect? Female-voiced complaint was fashionable in the high poetic culture of the 1590s, but what happens to complaint when it is taken up by early modern women writers? What forms—and what purposes—does the literature of complaint and grievance take on in non-elite or manuscript spheres, in miscellanies, commonplace books, petitions, street satires, ballads and songs? What are the classical and biblical traditions on which Renaissance complaint is based? And what happens to complaint after the Renaissance, in Romantic poetry, in the reading and writing cultures of the British colonial world, in contemporary poetry, and in the #metoo movement?

Keynote speakers:
Professor Danielle Clarke, University College, Dublin
Professor Kate Lilley, University of Sydney
Professor Rosalind Smith, University of Newcastle, Australia

We invite anyone with an interest in the literature of complaint and the politics of grievance to submit a 250-word paper proposal by 31 October 2018 to the conference organiser, Sarah.Ross@vuw.ac.nz.

This conference is supported by the Royal Society of New Zealand’s Marsden Fund, as part of the three-year project ‘Woe is me: Women and Complaint in the English Renaissance’.

Call: https://arts.unimelb.edu.au/amems/resources/conferences#complaint

 

 

"MIND AND BODY": 7th LIVING LATIN AND GREEK IN NEW YORK CITY

New York City, USA: Feb 16-17, 2019

The Paideia Institute is pleased to welcome abstract submissions to the seventh iteration of Living Latin and Greek in New York City. This conference, which features papers delivered in Latin and Ancient Greek as well as small breakout sessions where participants practice speaking Latin and Greek under the guidance of expert instructors, will be held at Fordham University on February 16th and 17th.

The theme of this year's conference is "Mind and Body." How are the life of the mind and the life of the body related? Are they friends or enemies, equals or unequals? Are human beings made up of essentially different "parts" — and, if so, are there two, three or more such parts? How, ideally, do these parts interact? Does the body rule the mind, or the mind the body?

We invite proposals for short talks in Greek or Latin on this theme with examples from Ancient Greek and Latin literature. Topics might include: advice on the upkeep of the mind and/or body; literary treatments of the mind and/or body; discussions of material culture relating to the theme of mind and body. We also welcome submissions on how the theme of mind and body relates to classical language pedagogy. Outstanding submissions on other topics, especially on Latin or Greek pedagogy, will also be considered.

Please follow the link https://www.paideiainstitute.org/llinyc_abstract_submission to send in an abstract of no more than 500 words. The deadline for submissions is September 15, 2018. Travel bursaries are available and can be applied for through the same link. We encourage accepted speakers to apply for external funding as well since the number of travel bursaries is limited. All talks will be recorded, subtitled, and (with each speaker's permission) published on Paideia's Youtube channel.

Call: https://www.paideiainstitute.org/llinyc_2019_call_for_papers

(CFP closed September 15, 2018)

 

 

#CFP CLASSICAL REPRESENTATIONS IN POPULAR CULTURE

Southwest Popular / American Culture Association (SWPACA) - 40th Annual Conference

Hyatt Regency Hotel & Conference Center, Albuquerque, New Mexico: February 20-23, 2019

Proposals for papers and panels are now being accepted for the 40th annual SWPACA conference. One of the nation’s largest interdisciplinary academic conferences, SWPACA offers nearly 70 subject areas, each typically featuring multiple panels. For a full list of subject areas, area descriptions, and Area Chairs, please visit http://southwestpca.org/conference/call-for-papers/

Classical Representations in Popular Culture

Papers on any aspect of Greek, Roman, or Mediterranean antiquity in contemporary or popular culture are eligible for consideration.

Potential topics include representations of ancient literature or culture in:

* Classical Motifs/Allusions/Parallels in Popular Music
* Graphic Novels and Cartoons
* Cinema directly or indirectly reflecting aspects of the ancient world in cinema: recent films involving * Classical themes which you might consider include The Legend of Hercules, Pompeii, La Grande Belezza, Inside Llewyn Davis, the new Ben Hur, as well as television series which engage with classical themes like Doctor Who, Game of Thrones, Spartacus, Battlestar Galactica.
* Literary Theory/Postcolonial Theory/Reception Studies: Literary or theoretical analysis of literature employing classical references or motifs, like Anne Carson’s Autobiography of Red, or Margaret Atwood’s Penelopiad.
* Classical themes in productions of theater, opera, ballet, music, and the visual arts.
* Science Fiction/Fantasy: Analysis of representations of classical history, literature, or philosophy in science fiction movies or books, as Edward Gibbons to Asimov’s Foundation Trilogy or the impact of Thucydides in Cold War cinema. Or, conversely, the influence of Science Fiction on representations of the ancient world in later cinema (e.g., how did George Lucas’ empire of the Star Wars franchise influence later representations of the Roman Empire?)
* Pedagogy: applications of classics in popular culture: how can we use contemporary films, literature in the classroom?
* Children’s Literature: Greek and Roman mythology in children’s film, television, or literature.

All proposals must be submitted through the conference’s database at http://register.southwestpca.org/southwestpca

For details on using the submission database and on the application process in general, please see the Proposal Submission FAQs and Tips page at http://southwestpca.org/conference/faqs-and-tips/

Individual proposals for 15-minute papers must include an abstract of approximately 200-500 words. Including a brief bio in the body of the proposal form is encouraged, but not required.

For information on how to submit a proposal for a roundtable or a multi-paper panel, please view the above FAQs and Tips page.

The deadline for submissions is November 1, 2018.

SWPACA offers monetary awards for the best graduate student papers in a variety of categories. Submissions of accepted, full papers are due January 1, 2019. For more information, visit http://southwestpca.org/conference/graduate-student-awards/

Registration and travel information for the conference is available at http://southwestpca.org/conference/conference-registration-information/

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/scs-news/cfp-classical-representations-popular-culture

 

 

#CFP AUTHORITY IN CREATING CONTEMPORARY NARRATIVES ABOUT THE CLASSICS

Newcastle University, UK: 21-22 February, 2019

The current boom of works and media about the Ancient World aimed at a general audience is a product of some converging circumstances: the rethinking of meaning and value of the Classics among scholars, in need of justifying our very own existence in contemporary academia; a market-driven demand for either recalling Western tradition and exempla from the ancients – on the conservative side, or questioning the multiple facets of elite privilege – on a progressive approach; and ultimately as a consequence of the “explosion of information” in the hyper-connected XXI century. In this last regard, narratives from non-scholars ranging from fairly accurate Wikipedia articles to “fake news” tweets are now competing with classicists for space and authority.

This new “shared authority”, a term coined by public historian Michael Frisch, calls for reflection. We invite papers on topics related to the topics above, inviting discussion on themes such as:

* What is the role of the scholar in determining narratives for the general audience?
* How to understand and respond to the public’s demand on topics, old and new, about the ancients?
* Forms of dialogue with non-scholar producers of knowledge about the Classics, esp. online;
* Political and global aspects of conservative and progressive approaches to Ancient World.

We invite abstracts for 20-minute papers, which will be followed by debates led by assigned commentators. Presenters will be requested to participate as commentators in at least one other presentation. The conference will be published in a proceedings volume, including the resulting debate.

Please send abstracts (PDF format) of no more than 350 words, including 3-5 keywords to authorityinclassics@gmail.com. Submissions from PhD students are welcome.

Deadline: 30 October 2018.

The event will have no submission or attendance fees.

Keynote speakers:
Neville Morley (University of Exeter)
Sarah E. Bond (University of Iowa)
Rebecca Futo Kennedy (Denison University)

Conference organisers: Juliana Bastos Marques (Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro) and Federico Santangelo (Newcastle University). This conference is supported by a Newton Advanced Fellowship funded by the British Academy.

Call: https://listserv.liv.ac.uk/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind1809&L=CLASSICISTS&P=112362

 

 

#CFP KEATS AND MYTHOLOGY (1819-2019)

Rome, 22-23 February 2019

This conference celebrating the bicentenary of Keats’s annus mirabilis, 1819, the year he wrote the Odes, will be organised by the Keats-Shelley Memorial Association in collaboration with the Société d'Études du Romantisme Anglais and hosted at the British School at Rome.

All papers will be given on Friday 22nd February, and delegates remaining in Rome on Saturday 23rd February will be invited to take part in special tours of the Non-Catholic Cemetery, where Keats and Shelley are buried, and of the Keats-Shelley House, Keats’s final dwelling place, in order to mark the anniversary of Keats’s death.

Mythological considerations of Keats’s life and art will be welcomed: myths and literary influences, myth and tradition, myth and science, myth and genre, myth and painting, myth and literary criticism, myth and modernity (including cinema and popular culture). Papers may explore the study of Greek and Roman myths in Keats’s poetry (Psyche, Apollo, Endymion, Hermes, Hyperion). They could also consider the modern mythology (from the Middle French, mythologie, ‘legend or story’) which has amassed around Keats’s life and work, and engage with the complexity of the Keatsian mythologia, a subtle mix of poetic fiction (mythos) and romanticised discourse (logia).

The conference is being organised by Giuseppe Albano, Curator of the Keats-Shelley House, Caroline Bertonèche, from the University of Grenoble Alpes and President of the SERA (Société d’Études du Romantisme Anglais), and Maria Valentini from the University of Cassino and Chair of the Keats-Shelley Memorial Association in Rome.

Papers may be given in English, French or Italian, and abstracts accepted in any one of these languages.

Deadline for submission of abstracts (c. 200 words): 1st November 2018.

For further information on registration, and to send your abstract, please contact:

Dr Giuseppe Albano: giuseppe.albano@ksh.roma.it or
Prof. Caroline Bertonèche caroline.bertoneche@univ-grenoble-alpes.fr or
Prof. Maria Valentini: gerrima@tiscali.it

Registration fee €50. We plan to publish a selection of papers from the conference in an issue of the Keats-Shelley Review.

Call: http://www.keats-shelley-house.org/en/news/keats-and-mythology-1819-2019-%E2%80%93-a-call-for-papers

 

 

2019 HISTORICAL FICTIONS RESEARCH CONFERENCE

Manchester, UK: 22-23 February, 2019

The Call for Papers is now open. Papers on all topics and from all disciplines are welcomed.

This year, in honour of the 100th anniversary of the “Peterloo Massacre” we welcome in particular papers on the loose topic “Radical Fictions”.

Historical fictions can be understood as an expanded mode of historiography. Scholars in literary, visual, historical and museum/re-creation studies have long been interested in the construction of the fictive past, understanding it as a locus for ideological expression. However, this is a key moment for the study of historical fictions as critical recognition of these texts and their convergence with lines of theory is expanding into new areas such as the philosophy of history, narratology, popular literature, historical narratives of national and cultural identity, and cross-disciplinary approaches to narrative constructions of the past.

Historical fictions measure the gap between the pasts we are permitted to know and those we wish to know: the interaction of the meaning-making narrative drive with the narrative-resistant nature of the past. They constitute a powerful discursive system for the production of cognitive and ideological representations of identity, agency, and social function, and for the negotiation of conceptual relationships and charged tensions between the complexity of societies in time and the teleology of lived experience. The licences of fiction, especially in mass culture, define a space of thought in which the pursuit of narrative forms of meaning is permitted to slip the chains of sanctioned historical truths to explore the deep desires and dreams that lie beneath all constructions of the past.

We welcome paper proposals from Archaeology, Architecture, Literature, Media, Art History, Musicology, Reception Studies, Museum Studies, Recreation, Gaming, Transformative Works and others. We welcome paper proposals across historical periods, with ambitious, high-quality, inter-disciplinary approaches and new methodologies that will support research into larger trends and which will lead to more theoretically informed understandings of the mode across historical periods, cultures and languages.

We aim to create a disciplinary core, where researchers can engage in issues of philosophy and methodology and generate a collective discourse around historical fictions in a range of media and across period specialities.

Paper proposals consisting of a title and abstract of no more than 250 words should be submitted to: historicalfictionsresearch@gmail.com. The CfP closes on July 1st 2018.

Call: https://historicalfictionsresearch.org/conference-2019/

(CFP closed July 1, 2018)

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March 2019

ANCIENT IMAGES, MODERN EYES: THE CLASSICAL WORLD IN MODERN MEDIA & ADVERTISING

The University of Warwick, UK: Wednesday March 6, 2019

An exciting day of interactive workshops, discussions and activities on the theme of Classical Antiquity as it appears in modern media and advertising.

Beginning with the Renaissance and happening as recently as Ariana Grande’s video for the hit song 'God is a Woman', the ancient – and most often the Classical – world has been a constant source of inspiration for the visual media we create. Whether we reference it allusively or borrow from it directly, the Classical World has never gone out of fashion when it comes to art, advertising and design – and shows no sign of doing so.

Why does modernity seemingly have such an obsession with all things ancient and mythical? In what ways has classical imagery been used to be persuasive, beautiful, aspirational or evocative? How might our continued reliance on this imagery serve to enshrine negative or derogatory ideas concerning race, gender and aesthetics?

This event will involve a series of interactive talks and activities on numerous themes pertaining to the depiction of the ancient world in modern media – including issues of diversity, gender expectations and beauty ideals - hosted by researchers from Department of Classics and Ancient History at Warwick University, culminating in participants designing their own advertising campaign inspired by an aspect of ancient society. The day will get young people engaging with Classics and Ancient History in a way that is purposeful and feels strongly relevant to them – not just as students, but also as consumers of modern media.

This event is open to students in secondary school Years 9 – 11. ALL are welcome; however, it may be of particular interest to those studying Media, English Literature, Sociology, Fine Art, and Classics/Ancient History. Indeed, this event will provide a stimulating vehicle for putting into practice some of the wider aims of the various GCSE Media syllabi, helping to inform students’ critical understanding of the role of the media on its contemporary society.

To book please visit: https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/classics/research/outreach/warwickclassicsnetwork/events/ancientimages

Attendance at this event is entirely FREE OF CHARGE. Lunch & refreshments will be provided. Please kindly arrange your own transport – for information regarding transport links, parking & accessibility, please get in touch.

Any questions? ancimagesmodeyes@gmail.com

 

 

FLESHING OUT WORDS: POETRY ON OBJECTS, FROM CLASSICAL EPIGRAMS TO MODERN 'LIGHT POEMS'

University of Warwick, UK: March 9, 2019

Confirmed Keynote Speakers:
Prof. Richard Hunter, University of Cambridge
Robert Montgomery, London

When in 2012 the artist Robert Montgomery placed the aluminium letters of his poem ‘All palaces are/ temporary palaces’ in an empty swimming pool (Stattbad Wedding, Berlin), he deliberately embodied the written word into a physical context. With his ‘light poems’, he demonstrates how poetry can be a billboard, a tattooed body or even a gift to exchange for coffee: this interplay between word and object was already a quintessential feature of Graeco-Roman 'epigrammatic' poetry, which could be scratched or carved into walls, statues and stones. In our era of ‘Instagram poets’ and the quotation-culture of tweets, bits of poetry are spread across urban landscapes and social networks in the most variated forms, ingeniously combining words and objects, and making us aware of our inheritance of ideas developed in different ways in classical antiquity, linking poetry, materiality and objects.

The ancient epigram, a poetic form conscious of its ‘writtenness’ which originated as inscription (on gravestones, monuments and other objects) and which in fascinating ways lives on in our contemporary society, foregrounds questions about the materiality of texts in ways that we will take as a point of departure for this inter-disciplinary conference. When poetry is engraved on stones, scratched into walls, written on an object, how does the nature and use of that object affect our interpretation of the text? To what extent and how does the medium on which a poem is viewed influence the reader/viewer’s perception of it? This conference aims to investigate the shift between the epigram as embodying an inseparability of text and materiality, as conceived in the classical period and in the Renaissance (Neo-Latin epigram), and the modern re-interpretation of poetry on objects. The conference aims to create cross-disciplinary discussion amongst scholars in Classics, Arts, Comparative Literature, Renaissance.

We therefore welcome proposals engaging with - but not limited to - the following topics:

• Theoretical/ philosophical perspectives on poetry and materiality;
• The epigram book/ epigram as inscription;
• Continuities and differences between the conception of object and text in ancient/Renaissance epigrams and the new material expressions of modern poetry;
• (Responses to) the visual context/visuality of epigrams;
• The extent to which readings of ancient and/or Renaissance epigram might spur new perspectives on the contemporary production and consumption of poetry;
• The extent to which ‘epigram’ is a useful category/ recognizable poetic form in the modern world;
• The emergence of the Neo-Latin epigram.

Abstracts for 20-minute papers of no more than 300 words should be sent to fleshingoutwords.warwick@gmail.com by Monday September 24, 2018 (end of the day) Extended deadline October 1, 2018.

Please include in the body of your email: name, university affiliation and current position. Following the conference, we intend to submit proposal to the Warwick Series in the Humanities (with Routledge) for a collected volume: potential speakers should state with their abstract whether they wish to participate in this volume. Abstracts should be attached in PDF format with no identifying information.

We will inform participants of our decision by 31st October 2018.

Please see our conference website https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/hrc/confs/words, follow us on twitter (@fleshingw) and feel free to contact the organisers at fleshingoutwords.warwick@gmail.com for any queries.

We are looking forward to receiving your abstracts!

The Conference Organisers: Paloma Perez Galvan (p.perez-galvan@warwick.ac.uk) and Alessandra Tafaro (A.Tafaro@warwick.ac.uk).

Website: https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/hrc/confs/words

(CFP closed September 24, 2018 Extended deadline October 1, 2018)

 

 

SAPPHIC VIBES: LESBIANS IN LITERATURE FROM THE RENAISSANCE TO THE PRESENT

Université de Haute-Alsace (Mulhouse): March 14-15, 2019

Sappho’s poetry was rediscovered by the humanists in the 1540s, and translated into English for the first time in 1652. While her poems remain significant as a benchmark of lesbian representation in high literature, the name Sappho has become synonymous with desire and love between women in wider popular culture. In the first episode of the Netflix series Orange Is the New Black (2013–pres.), for instance, one inmate says to the protagonist: “I’m feeling some Sapphic vibes coming off you.” The word “vibes” calls into question the widely accepted belief that sexual identity can be reduced to a heterosexual–homosexual binary, and invites us to consider representations of love between women other than through explicit acts, words and relationships. Indeed, it recalls Adrienne Rich’s concept of a “lesbian continuum”—that is, “a range […] of woman-identified experience; not simply the fact that a woman has had or consciously desired genital sexual experience with another woman” (Rich 648). For this conference, then, we use the term “vibes” as a starting point for exploring the lesbian continuum as depicted in literature, from the explicit to the implicit, the said to the unsaid, the visible to the hidden. We will examine literary currents and movements, viewing the “vibe” as a reflection of the continuity and fluctuations in the representations of lesbianism from period to period, author to author.

We invite proposals for 20-minute papers in English or French focusing on any language area, but quotations and titles should be translated into English or French; comparative approaches are also welcome. Papers could explore, but are not limited to, the following questions:

How have the central motifs of lesbian-themed writing changed over time?
* Are some literary forms and genres more conducive to Sapphic representation than others? Is there a specific language that will transcribe the lesbian vibe?
* Is there a lesbian literary canon?
* What about texts in which desire and love between women are concealed, muted or repressed? Are there any “classic” texts that can be (re-)read from a lesbian perspective?
* How does literature depict female companionship and solidarity?
* How does lesbian-themed writing engage with debates on the place of sexual minorities in society?

A second conference, organised by Irma Erlingsdottir, will be held at the University of Iceland in 2020 exploring the same theme through history, literature, politics and philosophy.

Please send abstracts of up to 250 words and a brief CV to Carine Martin (carine.martin@univ-lorraine.fr), Claire McKeown (claire.mc-keown@univ-lorraine.fr), Maxime Leroy (maxime.leroy@uha.fr) and Robert Payne (robert.payne@uha.fr) by 1 October 2018.

Organisers: Carine Martin (Université de Lorraine), Claire McKeown (Université de Haute Alsace), Maxime Leroy (Université de Haute Alsace), Robert Payne (Université de Haute Alsace).

Scientific Committee: Organisers and Jennifer K Dick (Université de Haute Alsace), Irma Erlingsdottir (University of Iceland), Marion Krauthaker (University of Leicester), Guyonne Leduc (Université de Lille), Marianne Legault (University of British Columbia), Frédérique Toudoire-Surlapierre (Université de Haute Alsace).

Call: https://www.ille.uha.fr/803-2/

(CFP closed October 1, 2018)

 

 

[PANEL] ANCIENT ENMITIES: CLASSICISM AND RELIGIOUS OTHERS

Society for Early Modern Classical Reception (SEMCR): Panel at the 2019 Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America

Toronto, Canada: 17–19 March, 2019

Renaissance Europe sought to define itself in relation to multiple models, prominent among which were ancient Greco-Roman culture and contemporary non-Christian (as well as Christian heterodox) cultures. The Humanist emulation of classical ideals in text and image occurred within a larger context of religious, ethnic, and frequently military interactions: the expansion of the Ottoman Empire, harassment from North African Corsairs, mass migrations of Jews, and internecine tensions resulting from the Protestant Reformation. The “classical” provided a discourse through which scholars and artists could negotiate a religious, national, or pan-European identity transhistorical in scope yet ultimately presentist in defining “the other”. This panel seeks to explore the function of the classical and classicism across these identities in both textual and material sources.

Points of contact between classical culture and religious others turned antiquity into a battleground of competing traditions. Underlying such tensions was a longstanding sense dating from Homer and Herodotus onwards of classical identity as culturally and geographically contested, its meaning located variously in Western Europe, the Mediterranean, and the Near East. Both as traces of ancient ethnographies and as largely presentist rhetoric, projections of classical identity in the Renaissance could be deployed in numerous and diverse ways. Trojan ancestry was claimed not only by various European noble lines, such as the Habsburgs and the Estes of Ferrara, but also by the Turks. Orthodox Greeks under Ottoman rule were ostracized as the barbaric descendants of their enlightened ancestors. Antiquarians in post-Reconquest Spain invented Roman origins to Andalusi architectural marvels, while Roman ruins in North Africa and the Ottoman Empire, represented both visually and through ekphrastic description, fueled dreams of European conquest. At the same time, the means by which the classical past were known could be diminished or lost: despite its importance during the Medieval period for accessing intellectual traditions, for example, Arabic struggled to maintain its place in European scholarship as a learned language alongside classical Greek and Latin, and even as other distant foreign traditions, such as Egyptian Hermeticism, fascinated artists and scholars.

The panel addresses two areas that have been the focus of recent research in Renaissance studies: intercultural relations and concepts of temporality. While the importance of the classics for European identity has been extensively studied, their role in defining what lay beyond Europe’s margins has received less attention. Some scholarship, however, has shown the potential richness of the field: Craig Kallendorf’s reading of the Aeneid’s portrayal of colonized entities (The Other Virgil, 2007), for example, and Nancy Bisaha’s study of the competing portrayals of the Ottoman Turks as either Goths, Vandals, Scythians or heirs to the Trojans and Romans (Creating East and West, 2006). Furthermore, the panel seeks to understand the temporal and explanatory concepts undergirding various early modern genealogies, ethnographies, and histories. Although a topic of theory since Warburg, the problem of time and temporal relations in early modernity has received renewed attention with the publication of Nagel and Wood’s Anachronic Renaissance (2010). Applied beyond the original domain of art history, Nagel and Wood’s ideas prompt a wider re-evaluation of the importance of antiquity in framing our understanding of Renaissance Europe. At stake is a view of the central conflicts in Europe’s formative years not as exclusively early modern events, but rather as events crucially shaped by the vital force of classicism.

Potential topics include:

-- How did differing claims to Greco-Roman heritage shape religious rhetoric and antagonisms? How did the interpretation of classical texts evolve with the shifting needs of their early modern readers, either in marginalizing or legitimizing particular groups? How do these texts transcend class lines, especially among the uneducated and illiterate?

-- How did different national traditions of Humanism approach the contrasting degrees of religious alterity? How did classical writings and thought provide agency for marginalized groups?

-- How can a deeper knowledge of classical texts reshape historical understandings of crusades, jihads, reformations, expulsions, and heresies? In teaching these encounters, what pedagogical methodologies can guide students toward recognition of the pervasive relevance of these texts?

Abstracts of no more than 150 words and a short CV should be sent as separate email attachments to pramit.chaudhuri@austin.utexas.edu (please see RSA guidelines for abstracts and CVs). Abstracts will be judged anonymously, so please do not identify yourself in any way on the abstract page.

Please include the following in the body of your email:
• your name, affiliation, email address
• your paper title (15-word maximum)
• relevant keywords

Proposals must be received by August 10, 2018.

Organized by David M. Reher (University of Chicago) and Keith Budner (UC-Berkeley) with the sponsorship of the Society for Early Modern Classical Reception (SEMCR)

Call: https://www.rsa.org/blogpost/1696718/305579/Ancient-Enmities-Classicism-and-Religious-Others

(CFP closed August 10, 2018)

 

 

[PANEL] CLASSICAL AND EARLY MODERN EPIC: COMPARATIVE APPROACHES AND NEW PERSPECTIVES

Society for Early Modern Classical Reception (SEMCR): Panel at the 2019 Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America

Toronto, Canada: 17–19 March, 2019

The Society for Early Modern Classical Reception (SEMCR) welcomes proposals for papers to be delivered at the 2019 meeting of the Renaissance Society of America in Toronto. For one of its four panels, SEMCR invites abstracts on the subject of “Classical and Early Modern Epic: Comparative Approaches and New Perspectives”. In particular, we welcome papers offering reassessments of the current state of the field from cross-cultural and cross-temporal perspectives, or proposing new approaches to the connections between classical and early modern epic using methodologies from philology, digital humanities, cognitive studies, visual studies, or world literature.

In the shadow of a rising nationalism, epic poetry has taken on an ever greater importance through its mediation of national identity and as a focal point of reference and contestation. Even within rarefied scholarly discussions, the study of the genre, like epic itself, can appear to dominate other material, whether less canonical genres or non-Western epic. While the genealogical bonds between classical and early modern epic can seem to strengthen national ideologies and academic conventions, however, the content of the poems often works against such assumptions. Moreover, increasing diversity in research methods and scope, especially through collaboration, enables the scholarly community to renew the study of epic in more expansive and imaginative ways. Our panel aims, therefore, to reflect on the reception of Greco-Roman epic in early modernity partly as a topic in its own right, and partly as a means of understanding more general issues of theory, practice, and canonicity in literature and culture at large.

Proposals responding to recent developments in the scholarship might address, but are not limited to, one of the following questions:

- In light of recent work by Mazzotta, Ramachandran, Laird, and others, how might attention to worldmaking, post-colonial thought, and classical reception in the New World reframe our understanding of the relationship between ancient and early modern epic?

- Does the study of the relationship between classical and early modern epic have anything to gain from comparison with non-Western material, e.g., the Indic tradition? More generally, what are the advantages and disadvantages of analysing these traditions in terms of genealogy, ecology (cf. Beecroft), cosmopolitanism (cf. Pollock), or other systemic relationships?

- What light can cross-disciplinary approaches, especially those using computational tools (cf. Coffee and Bernstein) or cognitive models (cf. Jaén and Simon), shed on continuities and disjunctions between ancient and early modern forms of the genre?

- How did the idea of epic change as a genre during the early modern period, in particular given the different transmission histories of classical epics, especially works in ancient Greek? How might the growing attention to neo-Latin literature affect the fields of epic and/or reception studies?

- Are there developments in the aesthetics of a particular period that shed light on goings-on elsewhere? Besides substantial interest in the sublime (Cheney) and the mock-epic (Rawson), recent work has also focused on the quotidian (Grogan). More generally, what comparative understanding of epic can be gleaned from a study of contemporary critics and theorists, e.g., Horace or Tasso?

- What areas of research in early modern epic might benefit from the contributions of classicists without an extensive background in the field, and vice versa?

The Society is committed to creating a congenial and collaborative forum for the infusion of new ideas into classics and early modern studies, and hence welcomes abstracts that are exploratory in nature as well as abstracts of latter-stage research.

Abstracts of no more than 150 words and a short CV of no more than 300 words should be sent as separate email attachments to caroline.stark@howard.edu (see the RSA's abstract guidelines and CV guidelines and models). The abstracts will be judged anonymously: please do not identify yourself in any way on the abstract page. Proposals must be received by August 10, 2018.

Please include in the body of the email:
• your name, affiliation, email address
• your paper title (15-word maximum)
• relevant keywords

Call: https://www.rsa.org/blogpost/1696718/305583/Classical-and-Early-Modern-Epic-Comparative-Approaches-and-New-Perspectives

(CFP closed August 10, 2018)

 

 

[PANEL] CLASSICAL ORIGINS OF RENAISSANCE AESTHETICS

Society for Early Modern Classical Reception (SEMCR): Panel at the 2019 Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America

Toronto, Canada: 17–19 March, 2019

The Society for Early Modern Classical Reception (SEMCR) welcomes proposals for papers to be delivered at the 2019 meeting of the Renaissance Society of America in Toronto. For one of its four panels, SEMCR invites abstracts on the reception of classical theories of poetics and aesthetic experience in Renaissance art and music.

Plato’s and Aristotle’s theories of mimesis, Horace’s Ars Poetica, and “Longinus”’s sublime have long dominated discussions of early modern aesthetics. Scholars have also sought to trace the influence of other, less explicitly didactic texts in defining the origin and value of art and the aesthetic experience in the Renaissance. Paul Barolsky, for example, has argued that Ovid's Metamorphoses lies at the heart of Renaissance aesthetics, whether in the story of Pygmalion bringing art to life or, conversely, Medusa's petrifaction of the living as competing metaphors for sculpture. Barolsky likewise sees Ovidian transformation behind Michelangelo’s “non finito” and in the depiction of Botticelli’s Chloris becoming Flora in the Primavera. Wendy Heller has explored the ways in which Monteverdi and Busenello’s groundbreaking opera L’incoronazione di Poppea draws upon and challenges Tacitus’ methods of historiography. More recently, Sarah Blake McHam has argued for the pervasive influence of Pliny’s Natural History and its emphasis on life-like “naturalism” from Petrarch to Caravaggio and Poussin.

Building on these and other studies that move beyond questions of classical influence on the subject matter of Renaissance texts, this panel seeks papers that explore the strategies through which visual artists and musicians draw on classical aesthetics and the extent to which these hidden roots underlie Renaissance theory and practice.

The Society is committed to creating a congenial and collaborative forum for the infusion of new ideas into classics and early modern studies, and hence welcomes abstracts that are exploratory in nature as well as abstracts of latter-stage research.

Abstracts of no more than 150 words and a short CV of no more than 300 words should be sent as separate email attachments to caroline.stark@howard.edu (see the RSA's abstract guidelines and CV guidelines and models). The abstracts will be judged anonymously: please do not identify yourself in any way on the abstract page. Proposals must be received by August 10, 2018.

Please include in the body of the email:
• your name, affiliation, email address
• your paper title (15-word maximum)
• relevant keywords

Call: https://www.rsa.org/blogpost/1696718/305576/Classical-Origins-of-Renaissance-Aesthetics

(CFP closed August 10, 2018)

 

 

[PANEL] CONNECTING WITH THE ANCIENTS: PHILOLOGICAL RECEPTION IN THE RENAISSANCE

Society for Early Modern Classical Reception (SEMCR): Panel at the 2019 Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America

Toronto, Canada: 17–19 March, 2019

As an Associate Organization of the Renaissance Society of America, the Society for Early Modern Classical Reception (SEMCR) invites proposals for papers on classical philology in the Renaissance to be delivered at the 2019 meeting of the Renaissance Society of America in Toronto.

Renaissance engagement with the linguistic and literary culture of antiquity - whether in the form of language study, textual transmission, or translation - constitutes a relatively coherent body of evidence through which to understand the processes of and motivations for ‘receiving’ the classics. Renaissance appropriations of Greek and Latin philology become vehicles of cross-cultural communication in an increasingly divided early modern Europe. We welcome proposals that highlight the mutual benefits arising from closer engagement between classicists and early modernists on the topic of classical philology in the Renaissance.

The Society is committed to creating a congenial and collaborative forum for the infusion of new ideas into classics and early modern studies, and hence welcomes abstracts that are exploratory in nature as well as abstracts of latter-stage research.

Abstracts of no more than 150 words and a short CV of no more than 300 words should be sent as separate email attachments to caroline.stark@howard.edu (see the RSA's abstract guidelines and CV guidelines and models). The abstracts will be judged anonymously: please do not identify yourself in any way on the abstract page. Proposals must be received by August 10, 2018.

Please include in the body of the email:
• your name, affiliation, email address
• your paper title (15-word maximum)
• relevant keywords

Call: https://www.rsa.org/blogpost/1696718/305582/Connecting-with-the-ancients-Philological-reception-in-the-Renaissance

(CFP closed August 10, 2018)

 

 

DIVERSITY OF WRITING SYSTEMS: EMBRACING MULTIPLE PERSPECTIVES

12th International Workshop of the Association for Written Language and Literacy

Faculty of Classics, University of Cambridge: March 26-28, 2019

The Association of Written Language and Literacy’s twelfth gathering (AWLL12), organized in conjunction with the Faculty of Classics, University of Cambridge, will focus on the wealth of diversity within the world’s historical and contemporary writing systems. The conference sets out to offer an opportunity for exchange between a wide range of scholars interested in writing systems and written language, in order to foster greater mutual understanding of their multiple perspectives on the typological, structural, historical, sociocultural, technological, and individual variety present within writing systems. Abstracts are therefore welcome from researchers working on reading and writing within any academic discipline, including, but not limited to, linguistics, psychology, archaeology, sociology, education and literacy, technology, digital humanities, and computer science. PhD students and early-career researchers are also especially encouraged to apply.

Key issues to be addressed include:
• What fundamental principles underlie the structure and function of the world’s historical and contemporary writing systems? Is a single unified typology of writing systems possible or are separate taxonomies preferable?
• What linguistic and psychological processes are at work in the adaptation of one writing system to another? How are these affected by the cultural and social context of the adaptation?
• What linguistic, psychological, cultural and social, and technological factors bring about diversity within writing systems? How do such factors influence literacy acquisition and shape the use of writing?
• How can studying the development of historical writing systems enhance our understanding of contemporary writing systems? How can contemporary research on reading and writing contribute to the study of historical writing systems?
• How are the world’s writing systems likely to develop in the future? What principles should guide orthography development for as yet unwritten languages?

The 2.5-day programme will include two keynote lectures, a symposium focusing on research into ancient Mediterranean and Chinese writing systems at Cambridge, oral and poster presentations, and a panel discussion.

Keynote speakers:
Sonali Nag, University of Oxford (Research interests: literacy and language development and the relationship between writing systems and learning, particularly in South and South-East Asian languages).
Kathryn Piquette, University College London (Research interests: Egyptian and Near Eastern writing and art, and the development and application of advanced imaging techniques for the elucidation of ‘visual’ culture from the wider ancient world and beyond).

Local organisers: Robert Crellin and Anna Judson (University of Cambridge, U.K.)

Programme committee: Lynne Cahill (University of Sussex, U.K.), Robert Crellin (University of Cambridge, U.K.), Terry Joyce (Tama University, Japan), Anna Judson (University of Cambridge, U.K.), Dorit Ravid (University of Tel Aviv, Israel)

Abstract submission: Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be submitted as a PDF attachment to AWLL12.2019@gmail.com by September 30th, 2018. Please indicate whether you would prefer to be considered for an oral presentation (20-25min) or a poster presentation (maximum size portrait A0 or landscape A1). Applicants will be notified on the acceptance of their abstracts by the end of November 2018. Details of registration for presenters and for others wishing to attend without presenting will be circulated along with the final programme after this date.

Further information:
Conference website: https://awll12.wordpress.com/
AWLL website: http://faculty.tama.ac.jp/joyce/awll/index.html
Twitter: @awll2014
Facebook: Association for Written Language and Literacy

If you have any queries regarding the conference please contact the local organisers, Anna and Robert, at AWLL12.2019@gmail.com. For queries about AWLL, please contact Terry Joyce, at terry@tama.ac.jp.

(CFP closed September 30, 2018)

 

 

ORALITY & LITERACY IN THE ANCIENT WORLD XIII: REPETITION

The University of Texas at Austin, USA: March 27-31, 2019

The Department of Classics at the University of Texas at Austin invites all classicists, historians, religious studies and biblical scholars, and scholars with an interest in oral cultures to participate in the Thirteenth Conference on Orality and Literacy in the Ancient World, to take place in Austin (TX) from Wednesday 27 March 2019 to Sunday 31 March 2019.

The conference will follow the same format as the previous conferences, held in Hobart (1994), Durban (1996), Wellington (1998), Columbia, Missouri (2000), Melbourne (2002), Winnipeg (2004), Auckland (2006), Nijmegen (2008), Canberra (2010), Ann Arbor (2012), Atlanta (2014), and Lausanne (2016). It is planned that the refereed proceedings once again be published by E.J. Brill as Volume 13 in the "Orality and Literacy in the Ancient World" series.

The theme for the conference is "Repetition", and papers in response to this theme are invited on topics related to the ancient Mediterranean world or, for comparative purposes, other times, places, and cultures. Also welcome are papers that engage with the transition from an oral to a literate society, or which consider the topic of reception.

Further details about accommodations and other conference-related activities will be circulated later.

Papers should be 30 minutes in length. Any graduate student who would prefer a 20-minute paper slot is invited to express their preference in the cover email accompanying their abstract. Anonymous abstracts of up to 350 words (not including bibliography) should be submitted as Word files by June 30, 2018. Please send abstracts to: OralityLiteracyxiii@austin.utexas.edu.

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/scs-news/call-papers-orality-and-literacy-ancient-world

(CFP closed June 30, 2018)

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April 2019

#CFP SEVENTH ANNUAL CORK/LEXINGTON NEO-LATIN SYMPOSIUM

University College Cork, Ireland: 11-13 April, 2019

The Seventh Annual Cork/Lexington Neo-Latin Symposium will take place 11-13 April, 2019 in Cork, Ireland, hosted by the Centre for Neo-Latin Studies, University College Cork.

The Neo-Latin Symposium is devoted to the presentation of scholarly research in the area of Renaissance and Post-Renaissance Latin Studies. The symposium was established in 2013 by Professor Jennifer Tunberg at the University of Kentucky, Lexington, under the auspices of the Kentucky Foreign Language Conference (KFLC). Since 2017 it has been held in Lexington and Cork in alternate years as part of a continuing collaboration between University College Cork and the University of Kentucky (Lexington).

Abstracts are invited in all areas and aspects of Neo-Latin Studies, which may embrace linguistic, literary or historical approaches to the examination of texts and their contexts.

Relevant topics include, but are not limited to:
Neo-Latin Literature, Neo-Latin Historiography and Ethnography, Neo-Latin Language and Style, Neo-Latin Imitation, Adaptation or Translation from the Vernacular, Neo-Latin Letter Collections, Journals, Biographies, Autobiographies, Neo-Latin Pedagogy, Neo-Latin Rhetoric, Neo-Latin Treatises on Architecture, Botany, Cartography, Geography, Mathematics, Medicine, Music, Philosophy, Theology, Science, etc.

Papers are 20 minutes followed by a 10-minute question & answer session. In addition to individual abstracts for paper presentations, proposals for panels of 3 papers will be considered. The deadline for abstract submission is 16 November 2018.

Individually submitted abstracts should be no more than 250 words.

Proposals for individual papers should be submitted as follows:
The proposer should email a panel proposal to j.harris@ucc.ie. The proposal should consist of the name, contact information, and affiliation of the speaker(s), and an abstract of the proposed paper.

anel proposals of 3 presentations should be submitted as follows:
The panel organizer should email a panel proposal to j.harris@ucc.ie. The panel proposal should consist of a single document containing the theme of the panel, the organizer's name and contact information, the names, contact information and affiliations of the panel participants, and an individual abstract for each participant.

Deadline for Abstract Submission: 16 November, 2018

Papers should be read in English. Acceptance of a paper or complete panel implies a commitment on the part of all participants to register and attend the conference. A registration fee of €50 will apply to all participants of the symposium. All presenters must pay the registration fee by 15 February, 2019 in order to confirm participation and be included in the program.

For further information about the conference, registration process, and guidelines for paper presentation, please visit our website: http://www.ucc.ie/en/cnls/symposium2019

 

 

#CFP RECONSTRUCTIONS OF THE PAST: HOW DO WE MAKE THEM AND DO THEY MATTER?

25th Archaeology and Theory symposium organised by Stichting Archaeological Dialogues.

University of Leiden, The Netherlands: April 17, 2019

Archaeology studies the past through material remains of this same past, but these material remains only go so far. A leap of imagination is required to bridge the gap between the soil marks interpreted as post-holes and the reconstructed shape of the house that occupies the mind of the lay visitor to a site, the reconstruction drawing at the site, but also the scholarly discussion of whether they would have had conical or domed roofs. This reconstructive gap between the physical evidence and interpretation is the subject of the 25th Archaeology and Theory symposium organised by Stichting Archaeological Dialogues on April 17th 2019 at the University of Leiden, for which we invite abstracts for papers.

We are interested in the topic of reconstruction in a broad sense. Topics that we hope to address include, but are not limited to:

* Reconstruction drawings, are they art or science? How can an artistic approach help the scholarly pursuit and vice versa?
* What role does laboratory science play in (engagement with) reconstructions of the past?
* How can experimental archaeology help us in creating better and more engaging reconstructions of the past? What are its pitfalls?
* What role can re-enactment play in reconstructions and interpretations, or how can those engaged in traditional archaeology (academic, professional and interested public) meaningfully engage with the re-enactment community?
* Can we ethically make things up when we fill in the blanks, in reconstruction drawings, archaeological stories or fictionalised archaeological pasts?
* What role do the reconstructions we make play in the interaction between all those engaged with the profession (be they (interested) public, professional or academic)?
* How do reconstructions influence our research questions?

Abstracts should be no longer than 250 words and should be sent to archaeologicaldialogues@gmail.com. Closing date for submission of abstracts is 20 December 2018. Proposers will be informed of the committee’s decision early January 2019.

Stichting Archaeological Dialogues: http://www.archaeologicaldialogues.nl/

Call: https://listserv.liv.ac.uk/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind1810&L=CLASSICISTS&P=70378

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May 2019

#CFP RITRATTI DI CICERONE - PORTRAYING CICERO

Rome, Italy: May 15-17, 2019

The Department of Ancient World Studies, Sapienza University of Rome (http://www.antichita.uniroma1.it/), and the International Society of Cicero’s Friends (SIAC, www.tulliana.eu), with the support of the Cultural Association Italia Fenice (http://www.italiafenice.it/), are pleased to announce the International Conference ‘Portraying Cicero’, to be held in Rome from 15th to 17th May 2019.

Cicero has exerted a durable impact on intellectual life throughout the centuries. Universally recognized as a master of Roman prose and the embodiment of the art of words, he has influenced the history of ideas and contributed to the intellectual maturation of generations of students and scholars. Yet his controversial position in Roman politics has elicited different reactions since late Republic. As a historical figure, he has encountered criticism from intellectuals and men of culture. As Zielinski (Cicero im Wandel der Jahrundherte) has shown, each age has reacted to Cicero with its own sensibility. This conference aims to explore how Cicero has been represented- and interpreted- over the times. It seeks to shed light on the multiple, often contrasting, ways in which Cicero was received by later scholars and intellectuals. Special attention will be paid then to the reception of Cicero as an individual and man of letters, including his fortune as philosopher, epistolographer, and orator and his presence in literature and culture in modern times.

PhD students and young or early career scholars are invited to submit a proposal (400 words max) on the reception of Cicero as a historical figure and man of letters over the centuries.

Papers should be 20 minutes long (followed by discussion of 5-10 minutes). All the papers will be considered for publication in the peer-reviewed Series ‘Cicero’, edited by the Patrum Lumen SustineFoundation (Basel), under the supervision of the SIAC, and published by De Gruyter (Berlin).

Please send an abstract of no more of 400 words to Giuseppe La Bua (giuseppe.labua@uniroma1.it) by the end of October 2018. Notification of acceptance will be sent by the end of November 2018.

Confirmed speakers are: Y. Baraz, F.R. Berno, A. Casamento, R.A. Kaster, T. Keeline, G. La Bua, R. Pierini, F. Prost, Ph.Rousselot, C. Steel, H. van der Blom, J. Zeztel.

The Conference is organized by: Francesca Romana Berno, Leopoldo Gamberale, Giuseppe La Bua, Ermanno Malaspina, Emidio Spinelli.

Call: https://www.academia.edu/36126973/Call_for_papers_Portraying_Cicero

 

 

#CFP GAME OF THRONES: VIEWS FROM THE HUMANITIES

Seville, Spain: May 16-18, 2019

The series of novels by G.R.R. Martin, A Song of Ice and Fire, adapted for the screen with the title Game of Thrones, has become a true mass phenomenon worldwide. The books are eagerly awaited by their fans, while the broadcast of the episodes of the series breaks ratings and HBO subscriptions, and any news about it is featured in the first page of newspapers worldwide. The episodes of the last season have become the most downloaded files on the Internet ever.

Previous studies have shown the richness of both the books and the series. The battles, the political plots, the internal or family struggles, the landscapes and scenarios, the motivations of the characters, the ethnic groups represented, the expressly invented languages??, among many other subjects, provide numerous possibilities for analysis. The study of this world through the diverse perspectives provided by the Humanities and its academic rigor, will offer a new and enriching vision of this fantasy land and our own world.

What does a linguist have to say about the Dothraki language? A specialist of Communication studies about the phenomenon of fans? A political scientist about the machinations in King's Landing? A historian of the Roman world about the circle formation of the "Battle of the Bastards"? A jurist about the possibilities of bastard children to inherit? An economic historian about the Iron Bank? A classicist about the motives of Roman literature in the world of Game of Thrones? A geographer on the topography of the Seven Kingdoms? Etc, etc.

If you are interested in participating with a 20-minute presentation on any aspect of that world through the prism of the Humanities, in a totally relaxed but academically rigorous way, send us your name, affiliation, a title and an abstract (maximum 300 words), before 30th November 2018 to the following address: gotsevilla@gmail.com

The congress will take place in Seville, Spain, 16th to 18th May 2019. The proposals will be evaluated by the organizing committee and the participants will be informed of the decision throughout the month of January 2019.

Organized by: Rosario Moreno and Cristina Rosillo-López (Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Departments of Ancient History and Latin); Alfonso Álvarez-Ossorio and Fernando Lozano (Universidad de Sevilla, Department of Ancient History)

Call: https://listserv.liv.ac.uk/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind1809&L=CLASSICISTS&P=95823

 

 

#CFP ISRAEL SOCIETY FOR THE PROMOTION OF CLASSICAL STUDIES: 48th ANNUAL CONFERENCE

Tel Aviv University, Israel: May 29-30, 2019

Our keynote speaker in 2019 will be Professor Robert Kaster, Princeton University.

The conference is the annual meeting of the society. Papers on a wide range of classical subjects, including but not limited to history, philology, philosophy, literature, reception, papyrology and archaeology of Greece and Rome and neighboring lands, are welcome. The time limit for each lecture is 20 minutes. The official languages of the conference are Hebrew and English. The conference fee is $50.

Accommodation at reduced prices will be available at local hotels.

Registration forms with a list of prices will be sent to participants in due course.

All proposals should consist of a one page abstract (about 250-300 words). Proposals in Hebrew should also be accompanied by a one-page abstract in English to appear in the conference brochure.

Proposals, abstracts and other correspondence should be sent to Dr. Lisa Maurice, Secretary of the ISPCS at lisa.maurice@biu.ac.il.

ALL PROPOSALS SHOULD REACH THE SECRETARY BY 20th DECEMBER, 2018.

Decisions will be made after the organizing committee has duly considered all the proposals. If a decision is required prior to early February, please indicate this in your letter and we will try to accommodate your needs.

Call: https://www.archaeological.org/events/28645

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June 2019

ARS ET COMMENTARIUS

Paris - Sorbonne Université: 05-07 juin 2019

Colloque international organisé par l’EA 4081 Rome et ses renaissances, Sorbonne Université, l’Université Lyon 2, l’UMR 5189 HiSoMA et l’Institut Universitaire de France.

En plus de la tradition proprement fragmentaire, notre connaissance de la grammaire latine antique dépend de plusieurs sources : les manuels scolaires (artes), les glossaires et les commentaires aux auteurs littéraires.

La grammaire des commentaires, mêlée à d’autres notes de toutes sortes, forme un champ d’étude encore largement sous-exploité, sans doute en raison de son caractère épars et difficile à synthétiser : il s’agit d’un savoir diffracté, morcelé, et qui, loin de s’organiser de façon méthodique, n’a de justification que dans des explications ad locum ; c’est en particulier le cas pour Servius, qui sera l’objet du présent colloque.

Il n’existe quasiment aucune étude sur la question. Si l’on excepte les travaux inspirés de la Quellenforschung (notamment H. Kirchner 1876 et 1883), on peut citer la thèse de R.J. Bober (1971, un classement sans analyse), les travaux de R. Kaster (1978, 1980, entre autres) et d’A. Uhl (1998) sur les méthodes de Servius et leurs bases intellectuelles, mais rien en ce qui concerne le contenu linguistique proprement dit.

L’objectif de cette rencontre sera donc d’étudier les scolies grammaticales dans le commentaire de Servius à Virgile, en mettant en valeur ce qui peut constituer l’ars commentarii dans ses grandes lignes linguistiques : catégories, morphologie, syntaxe, concepts – en soi et dans son rapport aux artes grammaticae conservées.

Comité scientifique: Frédérique Biville (Lyon 2), Paolo De Paolis (Cassino), Maria Luisa Delvigo (Udine), Jean-Yves Guillaumin (Franche-Comté).

Informations pratiques:

-Les propositions de communication (titre et 15 lignes maximum de présentation, dans une des principales langues européennes) sont à adresser à Alessandro Garcea et Daniel Vallat (alessandro.garcea@sorbonne-universite.fr; Daniel.Vallat@univ-lyon2.fr) avant le 30/09/2018.
-La durée de chaque intervention est fixée à 30 minutes maximum (25 + 5 min de discussion).
-L’organisation du colloque ne pourra prendre en charge que les frais de séjour ; les frais de transport seront à la charge des participants.
-La publication des Actes du colloque est prévue après expertise des contributions, qui devront être impérativement remises avant le 30/09/2019.

Call: http://www.compitum.fr/appels-a-contribution/11752-ars-et-commentarius

(CFP closed September 30, 2018)

 

 

#CFP 2019 SYMPOSIUM CUMANUM: VIRGIL AND THE FEMININE

Villa Virgiliana, Cuma, Italy: June 20-22, 2019

The Vergilian Society invites proposals for papers for the 2019 Symposium Cumanum at the Villa Virgiliana in Cuma, Italy.

Co-Directors: Elena Giusti (Warwick) and Victoria Rimell (Warwick)

The ‘Father of the West’ has not escaped scrutiny by feminist criticism. Since identifying the repressed female voice with Virgil’s subversive voice of loss (Perkell 1997, Nugent 1999), scholars have turned from a practice of reading Virgilian women to an investigation of women reading Virgil (Desmond 1993, Cox 2011), from accounts of the patriarchal structures underpinning the Aeneid, and the poem’s performances of masculinity (Keith 2000), to readings that assert the centrality of the feminine in what is after all a history of reproduction (McAuley 2016, Rogerson 2017). Yet feminist approaches to Virgil still represent a tiny portion of contemporary scholarship, and Virgil – unlike Homer, or Ovid – has traditionally not been seen as fertile territory for feminist philosophy. This Symposium asks how ever-evolving contemporary feminisms might engage in new dialogues not just with the Aeneid, Eclogues and Georgics, but also with the Appendix Vergiliana, and aims to reassess, through Virgil, the role and potential of feminist modes of reading within classical philology. We welcome papers on any aspect of Virgil and the feminine/feminist criticisms and theories, and particularly encourage proposals by scholars interested in engaging across disciplines, and/or with any of the following topics:

abuse, affect, agency, animal, circularity, colour, desire, ecology, hysteria, identity, identity politics, ineffectiveness, intersubjectivity, lack, maternity, metaphor, metonym, nature, origin, pain, pleasure, the political, post-critique, pregnancy, queer, race, resistance, silence, song, teleology, time, touch, transferral, translation, virginity.

Confirmed Speakers: Sergio Casali (Roma Tor Vergata), Rita Degl’Innocenti Pierini (Firenze), Alex Dressler (Wisconsin-Madison), Erik Gunderson (Toronto), Alison Keith (Toronto), Helen Lovatt (Nottingham), Sebastian Matzner (KCL), Mairéad McAuley (UCL), Ellen Oliensis (Berkeley), Christine G. Perkell (Emory), Amy Richlin (UCLA), Sarah Spence (Georgia).

Papers will be 30 minutes with 15 minutes for discussion. Participants will arrive on Wednesday 19th June and the Symposium will include visits to Virgilian sites.

Anonymised abstracts of no more than 400 words in length should be sent to virgilandthefeminine@gmail.com by December 1, 2018.

NB. We are committed to make the event as inclusive as possible, so please do get in touch directly with the organisers if you have any enquiries regarding access or childcare, and for any further information:

Dr Elena Giusti E.Giusti@Warwick.ac.uk
Prof. Victoria Rimell V.Rimell@Warwick.ac.uk

For further information on this event and previous symposia, please visit the page of the Vergilian Society: https://www.vergiliansociety.org/symposium_cumanum/symposium-cumanum/

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/scs-news/cfp-%E2%80%9Cvirgil-and-feminine%E2%80%9D-vergilian-society%E2%80%99s-symposium-cumanum-2019.

 

 

#CFP 12TH CELTIC CONFERENCE IN CLASSICS

Coimbra, Portugal: 26-29 June, 2019

FIRST CALL FOR PANELS

Suggestions are invited, from potential convenors, for themes to form panels at the 12th edition of the Celtic Conference in Classics, at Coimbra (Portugal), 26th-29th June 2019. The Conference is expected to consist of upward of 15 specialist panels, which may be on any theme concerning Greek or Roman Antiquity.

Panels run in parallel and are open to every member of the overall Conference. Convenors propose and recruit their own panels, in liaison with the overall organizers of the Conference. Panels usually consist of some 15-18 speakers. Some may be smaller, with a minimum of about 10 speakers, but to exceed 18 involves shortening the time of some papers.

The official languages of the CCC are English and French. For 2019, papers in Portuguese and Spanish are also welcomed, provided that the speakers make available a substantial summary of their text in French or English.

For general guidance on the nature of the CCC, details of the previous two Conferences may be found at: (for 2017, Montreal) www.celticconferenceclassics.com; (for 2018, St. Andrews): www.st-andrews.ac.uk/classics/events/conferences/2017-2018/ccc/

A website specific to the 2019 conference will be available later.

For more information, contact Delfim Leão (leo@fl.uc.pt).

Call: https://listserv.liv.ac.uk/cgi-bin/wa?A2=CLASSICISTS;9a5160ec.1809

 

 

POETICS AND POLITICS: NEW APPROACHES TO EURIPIDES

Lyon, France: June 27-29, 2019

P. Brillet-Dubois, A.-S. Noel, B. Nikolsky and research center HiSoMA (https://www.hisoma.mom.fr/) invite paper proposals for an international conference to be held in Lyon, June 27-29th 2019.

In recent years, the tragic art of Euripides has been examined in more eclectic ways than during the peak of new historicist studies, and methods have been developed involving not only social, political, anthropological and religious but also (meta-)poetic, structural, dramaturgical and musical considerations. These perspectives are either juxtaposed to encompass the complexity of Euripides's drama or articulated to each other, aesthetic form being seen as a mode of political thought. The context within which drama needs to be interpreted has been expanded to include not only the institutions and dynamics of the Athenian city, but also other forms of poetry, art and thought to which the poet alludes in a constantly creative way or with which he competes. The conference aims at bringing together such diverse approaches to reexamine the relation between Euripides's poetics and the politics of his time.

Some of the questions that the conference hopes to raise are the following:

* How would we define today the political meaning of Euripides's plays?
* How is this meaning articulated to their form, structure, rhythm and other poetic aspects? How do studies on the materiality of Greek drama contribute to the question of politics?
* How does performance actualize or enhance the political impact of the tragic text and how do performance studies contribute to the political interpretation of Euripides's plays?
* Should we renounce the idea that Euripides is conveying a precise political message in a given play or does the combination of new methods allow us to identify his voice in a more subtle way than before? What is the specificity of his tragedies and of his approach to politics?
* Does a political interpretation preclude a search for a universal human meaning? When both meanings coexist, what are the poetical or dramaturgical means that unite or distinguish them?
* How can we integrate the fragmentary plays in the interpretation of Euripides's politics?
* Can the political reception of Euripides's plays throughout the centuries help us frame in a fresh way the relation between Euripides's poetics and the politics of his time?

Questions and abstracts (no more than half a page) should be sent before [extended deadline] October 12th October 7th, 2018 to: pascale.brillet@mom.fr.

Submissions will be examined by the members of the scientific committee: P. Brillet-Dubois (Université Lumière Lyon 2-HiSoMA), A. Beltrametti (Università di Pavia), D. Mastronarde (UC Berkeley), B. Nikolsky (RANEPA, Moscow), A.-S. Noel (ENS Lyon-HiSoMA), V. Wohl (University of Toronto).

Call: [pdf] https://www.hisoma.mom.fr/sites/hisoma.mom.fr/files/docs/Recherche/appels2018-2019/Euripidesconferenceannouncement.pdf

(CFP closed October 12, 2018)

 

 

#CFP CAROLUS QUINTUS: IMAGE AND PERCEPTION OF EMPEROR CHARLES V IN NEO-LATIN LITERATURE (21ST NEOLATINA CONFERENCE)

Freiburg im Breisgau, 27–29 June 2019

The reign of Charles V (1519–1556) coincided with the diffusion of Renaissance humanism throughout Europe. Whereas various research projects and a host of publications in the domain of history and art history have significantly improved our knowledge about Charles V and his court, it is surprising to see that his reception in literature, and especially in Neo-Latin literature, has to date received much less scholarly attention. Important work has nonetheless paved the way for further research. Suffice it to mention John Flood’s Poets Laureate in the Holy Roman Empire: A Bio-Bibliographical Handbook (Berlin / New York 2006), the investigation of Habsburg panegyric, conducted by a Neo-Latin research team in Vienna, led by Franz Römer and Elisabeth Klecker (see, among others, their contributions in Karl V. 1500–1558. Neue Perspektiven seiner Herrschaft in Europa und Übersee, edd. Alfred Kohler e.a. [Vienna 2002]), and the collection of essays, published by Roland Béhar and Mercedes Blanco (“Les Poètes de l’Empereur. La cour de Charles-Quint dans le renouveau littéraire du XVIe siècle”, in: e-Spania, 13, 2 [2012]), as well as seminal studies by Peter Burke (“Presenting and Re-Presenting Charles V”, in: Charles V 1500–1558 and his Time, edd. Hugo Soly / Wim Blockmans [Antwerp 1999], 393–475) and Hermann Wiegand (“Das Bild Kaiser Karls V. in der neulateinischen Dichtung Deutschlands”, in: Acta conventus Neo-Latini Bonnensis, edd. Rhoda Schnur e.a. [Tempe, AZ 2006], 121–143).

Neo-Latin authors have played a substantial role in fashioning the image and perception of Charles V. Their writings help us to refine and correct our understanding of the image-building and communication strategies surrounding the Emperor. The 500th anniversary of the election of Charles V as King of Germany and Holy Roman Emperor on 28 June 1519 offers a symbolic occasion for a fresh look at the Latin literature devoted to or connected with him. At stake are not only contemporary authors, but also litterati from later periods, who looked back and reflected on his rule. The range of possible topics is very wide and includes, among others, the following themes and questions:

The imperial myth: Neo-Latin authors have contributed substantially to the development of an imperial ideology surrounding Charles V in all its allegorical and symbolic dimensions. Charles’s chancellor, Mercurino Gattinara (1465–1530), in particular, propagated the idea of an empire, established by divine providence, and others elaborated upon this concept with messianic motifs and prophetic claims. In this perspective, the Emperor was entrusted with the task of uniting the world under his sole pastoral care, waging war against the heretics and infidels, and re-installing a universal monarchy. At the same time, the Emperor was styled as a hero and a saint according to literary, historical, philosophical and religious norms, conventions and models, drawn from both Classical Antiquity and the Middle Ages. The rich Neo-Latin source material, that is abundantly available in both printed and manuscript form, yields a multiplicity of literary contexts to be explored, topics and techniques of praise and blame to be analyzed and different forms of imperial representation to be examined.

Divergences and similarities: Beyond the universal ambitions of the Emperor, the relevant texts offer a multitude of both laudatory and critical statements and judgments about Charles V, which need to be scrutinized in their respective historical contexts. In addition to the special case of foreign enemies of Charles and his opponents within the Empire, such as the Protestants, there are various national or regional perspectives to be taken into account: How did other courts and territories position themselves vis-à-vis the Emperor and the Holy Roman Empire? How were dramatic events, such as the Sacco di Roma of 1527, commented upon in different milieus? Did all Neo-Latin authors share the same ethical and aesthetical ideals in the way they portrayed Charles? To what extent were the literary discourses surrounding Charles determined by the rules and principles of distinctive literary genres?

Social strategies and patronage: The Latin literature devoted to or connected with Charles V plays a special role in the context of patronage and, more generally, in the construction of social relationships in a court environment. Throughout the early modern age Neo-Latin literature, in particular, often served as a literary instrument for securing the support of a mecenas and gaining access to specific communities. At times the Emperor himself acted as a patron, but high-ranking persons from his entourage assumed that role as well. It will thus be interesting to pursue the question how the relationships between these different partners were constructed and staged in Neo-Latin texts. The panegyrical Poemata of Antonio Sebastiano Minturno (1500–1574), e.g., published in 1564 but partly written already during Charles’s lifetime, illustrate both options at the same time: the poems eulogize not only Charles V, but also his secretaries Nicolas Perrenot de Granvelle (1484–1550) and Francisco de los Cobos (ca. 1477–1547), as well as Miguel Mai (ca. 1480–1546), who served as Charles’s ambassador in Rome from 1528 to 1533 and was thereafter Vice-Chancellor of the Crown of Aragón. The timing of the publication is, in this case as in many others, a further factor that merits attention.

Practical information:

Topics: We welcome papers on specific case studies that focus on individual texts, authors or courts, but it will also be possible to combine various facets and analyze, e.g., specific events, such as a coronation or a Joyous Entry, from different points of view. Neo-Latin texts in both verse and prose can be dealt with.

Proposals and registration: Paper proposals, containing a provisional title and an abstract of ca. 10 lines, should reach one of the organizers by 1 December 2018 via e-mail. Participants who will not give a paper do not need to register.

Travel and accommodation: The conference will start with a key-note lecture on 27 June in the evening and close on 29 June around noon. Rooms will be booked by the organizers, unless participants explicitly point out that they prefer to make their own arrangements. Further practical details will be communicated after the deadline for proposals has passed and the list of speakers has been established. The organizers will make every effort to raise the funds necessary for covering travel and accommodation costs of all speakers.

Location: Haus zur Lieben Hand (Löwenstraße 16) and the library of the Seminar für Griechische und Lateinische Philologie of the University of Freiburg.

Format: 20 minutes for the paper and 10 minutes for discussion. Papers can be delivered in German, English, French, Italian or Latin.

Publication: The conference proceedings will be published in the series ‘NeoLatina’ (Tübingen: Gunter Narr-Verlag).

About the ‘NeoLatina’ conferences: The Neo-Latin conferences in Freiburg were initiated in 1999 by Eckard Lefèvre and Eckart Schäfer under the title ‘Freiburger Neulateinisches Symposion’. Since then, they have been organized every year and have become an acclaimed event in the community of Neo-Latin scholars. Since 2013 the conference runs under the title ‘NeoLatina’ in order to document its link with the Gunter Narr publishing house, which produces the conference proceedings.

Organizers: Virginie Leroux (École pratique des hautes études, EPHE, PSL; virginie@leroux.netv), Marc Laureys (Universität Bonn; m.laureys@uni-bonn.de), Florian Schaffenrath (Ludwig Boltzmann Institut für Neulateinische Studien, Innsbruck; florian.schaffenrath@neolatin.lbg.ac.at), Stefan Tilg (Universität Freiburg; stefan.tilg@altphil.uni-freiburg.de)

Call: http://neolatin.lbg.ac.at/upcoming-conferences/call-papers-carolus-quintus-image-and-perception-emperor-charles-v-neo-latin-literature

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July 2019

CLASSICAL ASSOCIATION ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2019 / 15TH FIEC CONGRESS

Institute of Education (University College London), July 4-8, 2019

Call for Panels & Posters: http://fiecnet.blogspot.com.au/2018/04/fiec-congress-call-for-panels-and.html. Revised deadline: September 1, 2018

Website/Program: http://www.fiec2019.org.

Twitter: @Fieca2019.

(CFP closed September 1, 2018)

 

 

#CFP DESCENT OF THE SOUL: KATABASIS AND DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY

Freud Museum, London: July 5-6 [TBC] 2019

Jung regarded the Nekyia as a ‘meaningful katabasis ...a descent into the cave of initiation and secret knowledge’ (CW5). He saw this as an appropriate model for deep self-descent toward healing. Famously he allowed himself to drop deep within the Self during a time of near-psychosis, and encountered the archetypal figures who formed crucial elements of his psychology: the old man, the hero, anima and animus. Included in this insight is acknowledgement of the paradoxical idea of one of his often cited sources, Heraclitus: descent and ascent are the same.

From Poe to Nietzsche, the self has always presented as an ‘abysmal’ problem as it was also for the ancients: the self is a dilemma to be resolved in confronting the risks of staring into the depths, exposing oneself to the risks, and moving on, possibly to acceptance...

Seneca advises ‘[that even the bravest of men go] blind with dizziness if he looks down on an immense depth (vastem altitudinem) when standing on this brink (in crepidine eius)’ (57.4)

‘So cast, the brink of life begins to resemble the brink of nothingness ... and the point is that the destitution of the self is not an aberration: it is one of the commonest ways in which subjects are formed in antiquity. Self-destitution paradoxically is a finely honed technique of the self, a practice that produces, literally constitutes – the self.’ (Porter, Foucault Studies 2017).

Using these insights as a springboard we want to explore the formation of self as a look into the abyss: as Poe proposed in ‘The Imp of the Perverse’ staring into the abyss was dangerous because it looked back at you. Nietzsche attests to this in more dire terms in Beyond Good and Evil. Yet Seneca would scoff at fear of this examination of the self; the momentous problem of self-formation was an ethical imperative.

And in his essay about the collective unconscious, projection of universal anxieties that the ‘rumours’ of flying saucers attest to, Jung quotes Goethe’s Faust: ‘Then to the depths!/I could as well say height:/It’s all the same.’

The achievement of the Self is a life-long endeavour involving confrontations or engagements to dissolve elements of projection that split the self into dissociated fragments. It could be argued that fragments or multiplicity is also what Jung meant by Self. This has been a considered motif since ancient times, in many cultures. During this conference the different modes of self-formation, as problem, or rather as self-fashioning endeavour/process or one of discovery can be seen through depth psychology’s enterprise as a therapy to heal the soul, or the self.

We are looking for papers exploring the abyss, and how it constitutes and heals the Self, or does not. Papers will be accepted that explore aspects of this problematic of descent/ascent into the depths within the frame of analytical and all theoretical orientations of depth psychology and archaic thought. Please present a proposal by end of October 2018 of approx. 300 words to lgardn@essex.ac.uk.

5th July (+ tentatively also 6th July) 2019: Freud Museum, Hampstead London.

Leslie Gardner (University of Essex), Richard Seaford (University of Exeter), Paul Bishop (University of Glasgow), Terence Dawson (Singapore), Ben Pestell (University of Essex), Mark Saban (University of Essex), Catriona Miller (Glasgow Caledonian University), Alan Cardew (University of Essex).

Call: https://katabasisdepthpsychology.wordpress.com/2018/06/23/the-descent-of-the-soul-katabasis-and-depth-psychology/

 

 

#CFP PACIFIC RIM ROMAN LITERATURE SEMINAR 33: ROMAN MEMORY

University of Newcastle (Australia): 10 to 12 July 2019

The thirty-third meeting of the PacRim Roman Literature Seminar will be held at the University of Newcastle from 10 to 12 July 2019. The theme for the 2019 conference will be Roman Memory.

We are inviting papers on Roman literature on the subject of memory. This might include: representations of Roman history in subsequent periods, the ways in which Latin authors rewrite earlier Roman literature, the use of the Muses as repositories of cultural memory, commemorations of the dead, the methods by which Roman writers position themselves in the literary tradition, the reception of Latin literature in both antiquity and later eras, the loss and recovery of historical memory, the processes of collective memory, the art of forgetting, and resistance to official efforts to erase memory through damnatio memoriae.

The theme may be interpreted broadly and papers on other topics will also be considered.

Papers should be 30 minutes in length (with fifteen minutes of discussion time). The Pacific Rim Seminar does not run parallel sessions; participants may attend any or all papers. Abstract proposals of 200-300 words should be sent to Marguerite Johnson (marguerite.johnson@newcastle.edu.au) and/or Peter Davis (peter.davis@adelaide.edu.au). Submissions from graduate students and early-career researchers are welcome. Please submit abstracts by 28 February 2019. Earlier submissions are of course welcome.

We expect that conference will be held in a venue in the city of Newcastle. A conference website will be built in due course.

 

 

#CFP THE MARY RENAULT PRIZE

Applications close: July annually.

The deadline for the 2019 Mary Renault Prize competition is: TBA.

The Mary Renault Prize is a Classical Reception essay prize for school or college sixth form pupils, awarded by the Principal and Fellows of St Hugh’s College, and funded by the royalties from Mary Renault’s novels.

The Principal and Fellows of St Hugh’s College offer two or more Prizes, worth up to £300 each, for essays on classical reception or influence submitted by pupils who, at the closing date, have been in the Sixth Form of any school or college for a period of not more than two years. The prizes are in memory of the author Mary Renault, who is best known for her historical novels set in ancient Greece, recently reissued by Virago. Renault read English at St Hugh’s in the 1920s and subsequently taught herself ancient Greek. Her novels have inspired many thousands of readers to pursue the study of Classics at University level and beyond. At least one prize will be awarded a pupil who is not studying either Latin or Greek to A-level standard. The winning essay will be published on the College’s website. Teachers wishing to encourage their students to enter the competition can download, display and circulate the competition poster in the ‘related documents’ section.

Essays can be from any discipline and should be on a topic relating to the reception of classical antiquity – including Greek and Roman literature, history, political thought, philosophy, and material remains – in any period to the present; essays on reception within classical antiquity (for instance, receptions of literary or artistic works or of mythical or historical figures) are permitted. Your submission must be accompanied by a completed information cover sheet. Essays should be between two-thousand and four-thousand words and submitted by the candidate as a Microsoft Word document through the form below.

Website: https://www.st-hughs.ox.ac.uk/prospectivestudents/outreach/mary-renault-prize/

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August 2019

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September 2019

#CFP HELLENIC POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY AND CONTEMPORARY EUROPE

Herceg Novi (Montenegro): September 29-October 4, 2019

Center for Hellenic Studies, from Podgorica (Montenegro) is happy to announce the international conference on the topic "Hellenic Political Philosophy and Contemporary Europe", to be held in Herceg Novi (Montenegro), from 29 September to 04 October 2019.

The Conference is of an interdisciplinary character, and aims at addressing different social and political issues from perspectives of history, philosophy, economics, theology, history of ideas, anthropology, political theory and other disciplines. Such conception of the scholarly exchange does not fulfill only the purpose of an historical investigation, but will provide a systematic treatment of the topic, thus clarifying existing ideas and advancing new ones. We welcome papers on topics like:

* The concept of the polis in antiquity and modernity
* Freedom and democracy
* Politics and economy
* Democracy, liberalism, totalitarianism
* The philosophy of the polis: Citizen, polis and cultural ideals
* Autonomy and responsibility in politics
* The philosophy of the cosmopolis
* The polis and happiness
* Ethics and politics
* and other relevant themes.

Please see the full call for papers at: http://ichs.me/call-for-papers/

Abstracts of up to 200 words should be submitted by 1 March 2019, via the registration form, or sent by email to conference@ichs.me

For more information please visit the website: http://ichs.me which will be constantly updated with new information.

Website: http://ichs.me.

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October 2019

#CFP METAMORPHOSIS AND THE ENVIRONMENTAL IMAGINATION, FROM OVID TO SHAKESPEARE

UCLA: October 11-12, 2019

Narratives of metamorphosis, from human into other living forms, have long provided an important site for thinking through the complexities of our relationship with the world around us. From Ovid to David Cronenberg, thinkers and artists have used the trope of physical transformation to figure the ways in which human and non-human agencies have evolved from and adapted to one another in a relationship characterised by fluctuating perceptions of friction and symbiosis, distance and proximity. This conference seeks to locate the theme of metamorphosis in the early history of the western environmental imagination, from Classical antiquity to the Early Modern period; and to explore the ways in which the various cultural and historical manifestations of metamorphosis from this earlier period resonate with the environmental approaches and concerns of our present day.

Metamorphosis may be an idea with a long history, yet it continues to answer to the eco-critical imperatives of our own era. Its exposure of the porousness of human and non-human categories calls into question many other dualisms that current environmental discourses seek to deconstruct: between mind and matter, self and other, subject and object, culture and nature, all these the legacy of an epistemic shift introduced in the Early Modern period that laid the groundwork for the widely prevailing view of human exceptionalism that subsequently took hold. Eco-criticism has, since the nineteenth century, sought to reposition man as the object of environmental factors and forces, and to invest the non-human world with an agency and dynamism that was hitherto held to be the exclusive domain of humankind, even as, more recently, ideas of the Anthropocene have brought this process of redistribution full circle. Nowadays, we are invited to think more of an entangled mesh of human and non-human forces, a hybridizing compound of natureculture, and a fusion of material and discursive practices as biosemiotics and related ideas concerning the creative biosphere transform the world's contents into so much storied matter. Increasingly, eco-critics have turned back to the pre-modern era to search for intellectual analogues for the kinds of ontological continuum and/or hybridization between human and non-human that we are currently seeking the conceptual terminology to describe. Narratives of metamorphosis, a popular theme in Classical, Medieval and Renaissance storyworlds, provide a ready resource for this quest: on the one hand, the transformation of human into non-human bodies stages metamorphosis as a subordination to 'lower' forms of life. At the same time, it also offers a parable (admittedly, a highly anthropocentric one) for explaining the kinds of mind and agency that we now find attributed to non-human matter. Indeed, the emphasis that accounts of metamorphosis characteristically place on the physical aspects of transformation displaces the hegemony of the cognitive faculties as any kind of privileged index of human identity, and speaks rather to a mode of trans-corporeality that sees the human as just one bodily interface among many others.

While Ovid is by no means the first author in the western canon to draw on the theme of metamorphosis in order to reflect on man's relationship with the environment, his epic poem is a cultural landmark that enshrines this theme as a crux for later environmental discourse. Yet its significance as such has garnered more attention from cultural receptions of the poem, above all in the English Renaissance, than from modern scholarship on it (an imbalance that might in turn be attributed to the relative explosion of eco-critical studies of Renaissance culture since the 1990s as compared to a more incipient trend in Classical scholarship). Authors from Chaucer to Shakespeare, whose connection with antiquity is often owed overwhelmingly to a familiarity with Ovid's texts, frequently draw on images of metamorphosis to figure their own environmental questions and concerns, and have attracted a range of modern eco-critical approaches in recent times: from eco-feminist readings of Chaucer's bird narratives to the panoply of environmental concerns located in Shakespeare's probing of the limits of the human.Drawing inspiration from the poem's reception history, the organizers of this conference seek to reposition the Metamorphosesas a foundational text for the history of environmental thought, by investigating how its central theme of metamorphosis resonates with the environmental questions and discourses of the pre-modern era, and by considering how these echo and/or diffract our own. Using Ovid and Shakespeare as bookends for this important chapter in the history of environmental thought, we will invite scholars of Classical, Medieval and Renaissance culture to approach metamorphosis as a prism through which to explore both the continuities and the breaks in a tradition of environmental thinking that connects us, however discontinuously, with the distant past.

Please send a proposal of approximately 500 words to fmartelli@humnet.ucla.edu

DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACTS: October 15, 2018

Confirmed Participants
Jonathan Bate, Professor of English, University of Oxford
Lara Bovilsky, Associate Professor of English, University of Oregon
Emily Gowers, Professor of Classics, University of Cambridge
Lesley Kordecki, Professor of English, DePaul University
Mark Payne, Professor of Classics, University of Chicago
Alex Purves, Professor of Classics, UCLA
Robert Watson, Distinguished Professor of Humanities, UCLA
Bronwen Wilson, Professor of Art History, UCLA

Organizers:
Francesca Martelli, Assistant Professor of Classics, UCLA
Giulia Sissa, Professor of Classics and Political Science, UCLA

Call: https://www.facebook.com/expressum/posts/931031740410738

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November 2019

#CFP HOME & HOMECOMINGS: 33RD BIENNIAL CONFERENCE OF THE CLASSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SOUTH AFRICA

University of Stellenbosch, South Africa: November 7-10, 2019

The Classical Association of South Africa (CASA) invites proposals for papers for its 33rd Biennial Conference, to be hosted by the Department of Ancient Studies at the University of Stellenbosch.

We invite submissions that focus on the conference theme "Homes & Homecomings" as well as individual proposals on other aspects of the classical world and its reception. Panels are strongly encouraged and should consist of 3 to 8 related papers put together by the panel chair. We also welcome postgraduate students currently busy with Master’s or Doctoral programmes to submit papers for a "work-in-progress" parallel session.

Please submit a paper title, an abstract (approximately 300 words), and author affiliation to Annemarie de Villiers at amdev@sun.ac.za. The deadline for proposals is 31 May 2019.

Further information on conference fees and accommodation to follow in due course.

Call: https://listserv.liv.ac.uk/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind1810&L=CLASSICISTS&P=39235

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December 2019

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January 2020

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December 2020

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