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January 2020

[SCS PANEL #61] BEYOND RECEPTION: ADDRESSING ISSUES OF SOCIAL JUSTICE IN THE CLASSROOM WITH MODERN COMPARISONS

Society for Classical Studies (SCS) 2020 Annual Meeting. Washington DC: January 2-5, 2020

Organizers: David J. Wright, Fordham University, and Lindsey A. Mazurek, University of Oregon

This workshop explores the benefits and challenges of “then and now” approaches to issues of social justice in the classroom. The rise of reception studies in classical scholarship has made modern comparisons more common in contemporary classrooms (Hanink 2017). Dramatic incidents like the rape of Lucretia, the Ionian revolts, and the colonization of Gaul can fall flat on the page for modern students, and many better understand the classical world through analogies with the present. While some instructors and even students maintain that the ancient world must be studied and analyzed primarily in contexts divorced from the modern US experience, these comparisons can provide richer and more meaningful points of entry for undergraduates that raise new issues about justice, equality, and minority perspectives.

1. Nicole Nowbahar, Rutgers University - Using Cross-Dressing to Understand Ancient Conceptions of Gender and Identity
2. Curtis Dozier, Vassar College - Classical Antiquity and Contemporary Hate Groups
3. Matthew Gorey, Wabash College - The Reception of Classics in Hispanophone and Lusophone Cultures and Modern Imperialism
4. Lindsey A. Mazurek, University of Oregon - Comparing Present and Past in the Migration Classroom
5. Daniel Libatique, College of the Holy Cross - Cultural and Historical Contingencies in Ancient and Modern Sexuality
6. Sam Flores, College of Charleston - Races in Antiquity and Modernity

 

 

[SCS PANEL #35] CLASSICAL RECEPTION IN CONTEMPORARY ASIAN AND ASIAN AMERICAN CULTURE

Society for Classical Studies (SCS) 2020 Annual Meeting. Washington DC: January 2-5, 2020

Organizers: Christopher Waldo, University of California, Berkeley, and Elizabeth Wueste, American University of Rome

The field of classical reception has experienced a significant boom in the last decade, expanding to encompass receptions by ever more diverse communities of writers and artists. Several prominent scholars, including Emily Greenwood and Dan-el Padilla Peralta, have studied the emergence in the twentieth century of dialogues between the literatures of the Black Atlantic and classical antiquity, and there has been a noticeable surge in publications exploring the staging of Greek tragedies in non-western contexts. The last decade has also seen a relative rise in the visibility of classics in the Far East, as scholars like Jinyu Liu and Mira Seo have forged substantial institutional connections in China and Singapore respectively. This panel situates itself at the convergence of these two broader phenomena, investigating the reception of the classical tradition in contemporary Asian and Asian American culture.

1. Christopher Waldo, University of California, Berkeley - Introduction
2. Stephanie Wong, Brown University - Princess Turnadot, an Occidental Oriental
3. Kelly Nguyen, Brown University - No One Knows His Own Stock: Ocean Vuong’s Reception of Telemachus and Odysseus
4. Kristina Chew, University of California, Santa Cruz - Translating the Voices of Tragedy’s “Other” Women: Theresa Has Kyung Cha’s Dictee and Seneca’s Phaedra
5. Priya Kothari, University of California, Berkeley - A Palimpsest of Performance: The Construction of Classicism in the Vallabha Tradition
6. Melissa Mueller, University of Massachusetts Amherst - Response

 

 

[SCS PANEL #28] CLASSICS AND CIVIL ACTIVISM

Society for Classical Studies (SCS) 2020 Annual Meeting. Washington DC: January 2-5, 2020

Organizers: Yurie Hong (Gustavus Adolphus College), Marina Haworth (North Hennepin Community College), Amit Shilo (UC, Santa Barbara), T. H. M. Gellar-Goad (Wake Forest University)

Classicists at all levels have knowledge, experience, skills, and contacts that can usefully contribute to civic activism outside of academia proper. The Classics & Social Justice Affiliated Group has organized a workshop on the subject of Classics and Civic Activism for the upcoming AIA/SCS meeting. We invite proposals for a lightning round on outward-facing activism in which presenters will spend 3 minutes sharing their own experiences and making recommendations. These presentations will become integral to discussions among participants during the following breakout sessions.

The lightning round is the second of three parts of the workshop:

1) Three featured presenters from Indivisible, the National Humanities Alliance, and the American Federation of Teachers will offer guidance in community organizing, engaging with representatives, and other advocacy work, specifically focusing on how academics and educators can combine their skills and expertise with activism.

2) Lightning-round presentations will allow members to share their own experiences with civic engagement, presenting a broad spectrum of Classics-based activism.

3) Small-group discussion will allow time for participants to actively engage with the topics raised in the lightning round and share their own techniques and resources.

Potential lightning-round topics include, but are not limited to:

* using insights from the ancient world to advocate for social justice today
* engaging in political or community issue advocacy
* public-facing outreach projects
* advocating for educational policy
* organizing and unionizing at colleges and schools
* fostering inclusivity and accessibility in museums and historical sites
* letter-writing campaigns and citizen lobbying
* educating the public about ancient and modern democracy

Submit a 1-2 sentence proposal to be a lightning-round speaker by filling out this brief submission form https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSd1gaRC3BfaAmwri3UfKHYnKFI6OldlR8395x5xRTqaNUNo0Q/viewform no later than midnight September 15. The organizers are committed to ensuring diversity in topics and presenters, including presenters from all parts of the AIA/SCS membership: undergraduate and graduate students, retired members, teachers and professors, independent scholars, curators, editors, and more. We welcome submitters to comment on their own positionality in relation to their topic if they would like.

Due to limited time, not all potential speakers may be able to be accommodated during the lightning round, however there will be time during the following small-group discussion. Giving a lightning-round talk *does not* interfere with giving a paper or chairing a panel elsewhere on the program (per the SCS’ “single-appearance” policy).

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/scs-news/cfp-classics-and-civic-activism

(CFP closed September 15, 2019)

 

 

[SCS PANEL #77] CONSTRUCTING A CLASSICAL TRADITION: EAST AND WEST

Society for Classical Studies (SCS) 2020 Annual Meeting. Washington DC: January 2-5, 2020

John F. Miller, University of Virginia, Presider

1. Nathan M. Kish, Cornell College - Decorum, Obscenity, and Literary Authority in the Letters of Poggio Bracciolini and Panormita
2. Eric Wesley Driscoll, American School of Classical Studies at Athens - “A Single, Easily Managed Household”: Antiquity and the Peloponnese in Late Byzantium
3. Jesús Muñoz Morcillo, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology - Progymnasmatic Ekphrasis at the Latin School of Arezzo and Vasari’s “Memory Images”

 

 

[SCS PANEL #29] EOS: BLACK CLASSICISM IN THE VISUAL ARTS

Society for Classical Studies (SCS) 2020 Annual Meeting. Washington DC: January 2-5, 2020

Eos is a scholarly society dedicated to Africana Receptions of Ancient Greece and Rome. For our next workshop at the annual meeting of the Society for Classical Studies (SCS) in Washington, DC (January 2-5, 2020), we invite abstracts for papers that trace and interpret visual responses to classical materials among people of African descent and relate them to the typically more text-based study of Black Classicisms.

In conceiving of this event, we have sought to combine several convergent strands of scholarly inquiry in the study of the Greek and Roman Classics. The discipline has long noted--and in the recent past increasingly sought to disrupt--the strict separation between the study of literary texts and of material objects, including works of visual art. At the same time, greater attention has been paid to previously marginalized voices, both ancient and modern. Finally and concurrently, Classical Reception Studies has moved closer to the center of the discipline’s attention, as growing numbers of classicists have recognized that one cannot help but look at the past from a perspective that is shaped by the needs of one’s present.

In the words of Romare Bearden, African American artist and creator (among many other works) of a series of collages and water colors entitled “Odysseus Suite”: “An artist is an art lover who finds that in all the art that he sees, something is missing: to put there what he feels is missing becomes the centre of his work.” To foreground these “missing” centers through discussions of visual engagements with classical materials is our workshop’s objective. We hope to deepen our understanding of the intellectual, emotional, and creative responses elicited by the ancient world in people of diverse backgrounds, and contributors therefore need not—and indeed: should not—restrict themselves to the classical “half” of these inter-medial dialogues. Rather, there should be an equal emphasis on the messages the relevant artists seek to send to their contemporaries, and/or on how Greco-Roman materials are combined with other artistic traditions of (e.g.) Africa, the Mediterranean, the Caribbean, etc. in the pursuit of artistic and creative expression. One exemplary study of such processes is Robert G. O’Meally’s 2007 examination of Bearden’s “Black Odyssey,” which reveals among other influences the impact that Jazz improvisation has had on Bearden’s art and how the very method of presentation (i.e., collages availing themselves of rich color palettes) informs the creation of meaning in his work.

Nor need the piece(s) of visual art that stand at the center of each paper necessarily provide the sole focus of discussion. An alternate direction is hinted at in Kwame Dawes’s and Matthew Shenoda’s 2017 collection of poetic responses to Bearden’s Odyssey. On this model, a paper could put classical materials in multi-directional conversation both with visual and with literary reactions. In fact, the presenters should not try too stringently to exclude themselves from the creation of meaning in the multimedial interchanges they uncover. Rather, they should feel free to pursue what Lorna Hardwick and Emily Greenwood have called “frail” or “fuzzy connections.” Any interpretation of a point of contact between different works of art ultimately emerges from the viewer’s or reader’s own mind, not always necessarily from the artist’s. Yet it can still provide insights into the mechanics underlying the ancient and modern materials in question. Another way to make sense of this dynamic is to understand the artist’s role in the process as an act of Signifyin(g). According to Henry Louis Gates’s 1986 exploration of this trope, allusivity in Africa and the African Diaspora tends to combine repetition with revision, even as it remains deliberately open to varied interpretations.

Topics to consider include the work of Romare Bearden himself, but there are many additional artists whose sculptures, paintings, drawings, architecture, etc. invite the attention of Classical Reception scholars. Examples include, but are in no way limited to, Lorraine O’Grady, Simone Leigh, or Jack Whitten.

Eos is committed to creating a congenial and collaborative forum for the infusion of new ideas into Classics, and hence welcomes abstracts that are exploratory in nature as well as abstracts of latter-stage research. Above all, we aim to create a supportive environment for scholars of all stages working on Africana Receptions of Greco-Roman antiquity.

Abstracts of no more than 400 words should be sent as an email attachment to cfp@eosafricana.org by Friday, March 1, 2019. The abstracts will be judged anonymously: please do not identify yourself in any way on the abstract page. All presenters must be members of the SCS.

Edited 22/12/2019. Presentations:

1. Margaret Day Elsner, The University of the South - Sugar Baby’s Riddle: Sphinx or Sibyl?
2. Samuel Agbamu, King’s College London - Metamorphoses in Boots Riley’s Sorry to Bother You (2018)
3. Stefani Echeverria-Fenn, University of California, Berkeley - When and Where I (Don’t) Enter: Afro-Pessimism, the Fungible Object, and Black Queer Representations of Medusa
4. Tom Hawkins, The Ohio State University - Centaurs and Equisapiens
5. Stuart McManus, Chinese University of Hong Kong - Frank M. Snowden, Jr. and the Origins of the Image of the Black in Western Art
6. Michele Valerie Ronnick, Wayne State University - “Every Time I Think about Color It’s a Political Statement”: Classical Elements in the Art of Emma Amos
7. Shelley Haley, Hamilton College - Response

Organizers: Mathias Hanses, The Pennsylvania State University, Caroline Stark, Howard University, Harriet Fertik, University of New Hampshire, and Sasha-Mae Eccleston, Brown University.

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/2020/151/eos-black-classicism-visual-arts

(CFP closed March 1, 2019)

 

 

[SCS PANEL #37] FOUCAULT AND ANTIQUITY BEYOND SEXUALITY

Society for Classical Studies (SCS) 2020 Annual Meeting. Washington DC: January 2-5, 2020

Organizer: Charles Stocking, Western University

The political climate of Europe and North America has rendered the work of Michel Foucault relevant now more than ever, especially with regard to concepts such as biopolitics, power, and will to truth, among others. Furthermore, with the recent publication of several lecture series and other works, it has become increasingly clear that Foucault’s formulation of these seemingly modern political concepts was born out of a sustained engagement with antiquity throughout his career. This panel therefore offers the first collaborative effort to analyze Foucault’s engagement with ancient Greece and Rome beyond the topic of sexuality. The papers in this panel do not offer “Foucauldian” readings of antiquity per se. Rather, each paper engages with the genealogy and influence of Foucault’s thought as an occasion to reconsider specific themes, topics, and texts in the ancient world within a broader intellectual context.

1. Charles Stocking, Western University - Introduction
2. Marcus Folch, Columbia University - Foucault in the Roman Carcer
3. Charles Stocking, Western University - Foucault and the Funeral Games: Ancient Roots for a Modern Problematic of Power
4. Miriam Leonard, University College London - The Power of Oedipus: Michel Foucault with Hanna Arendt
5. Brooke Holmes, Princeton University - Biopolitics and the Afterlife of Michel Foucault’s Concept of Life
6. Paul Allen Miller, University of South Carolina - The Body Politic: Foucault and Cynics

 

 

[SCS PANEL #58] GLOBAL RECEPTIONS

Society for Classical Studies (SCS) 2020 Annual Meeting. Washington DC: January 2-5, 2020

Cynthia Damon, University of Pennsylvania, Presider

1. David Wray, University of Chicago - “Learned Poetry,” Modernist Juxtaposition, and the Classics: Three Case Studies
2. Christopher Stedman Parmenter, New York University - Frank Snowden at Naukratis: Revisiting the Image of the Black in Western Art
3. Kathleen Noelle Cruz, Princeton University - Norse Gods in Tyrkland: The Manipulation of the Classical Tradition in Snorra Edda
4. Adriana Maria Vazquez, University of California, Los Angeles - Dreaming of Hector in the Brazilian Neoclassical Period: Conceptualizing “Window Reception”
5. James R. Townshend, University of Miami - “Keep Quiet! You Can’t Even Read Latin!” The Satirical Purpose of Western Classics in Natsume Sōseki’s I Am a Cat

 

 

[SCS PANEL #32] HOMER IN THE RENAISSANCE

Society for Classical Studies (SCS) 2020 Annual Meeting. Washington DC: January 2-5, 2020

The Society for Early Modern Classical Reception (SEMCR) welcomes proposals for papers to be delivered at the 2020 meeting of the Society for Classical Studies in Washington, DC. For its fifth annual panel, SEMCR invites abstracts on the reception of Homer in all its manifestations in the early modern world.

The last fifteen years have seen an explosion in studies of the scholarly and creative reception of Homer in the Renaissance. Work by scholars including Marc Bizer, Tania Demetriou, Philip Ford, Filippomaria Pontani, and Jessica Wolfe--to name but a few--has illuminated the manuscript and print transmission of the Homeric texts and revealed the enormous range of contexts in which Homer was put to use and the immense variety of artistic, cultural, political, philosophical, and theological issues the Homeric poems were used to explore. Today it is possible to investigate questions in Homeric reception that would have been difficult to ask, let alone answer, fifteen years ago.

Proposals may address (but are not limited to) the transmission, translation, or book history of the Homeric texts; the commentary tradition; artistic, literary, or musical responses to Homer; political, philosophical, or scientific uses of Homer. We welcome the consideration of topics including the perspectives Homeric reception provides on Renaissance philology, knowledge of Greek or of oral composition, or the reconfiguration of literary or cultural histories; the discovery of Homer as a source of innovation or inspiration in a wide range of genres and media, or as an alternative to the authority of Latin poets or Roman culture; the geographical, political, or religious factors that influenced Homeric reception in different areas or communities, and the myriad uses to which the Homeric poems were put to explore those factors; the ways in which digital technologies might influence our understanding of Homer’s Renaissance reception.

We are committed to creating a congenial and collaborative forum for the infusion of new ideas into classics, and hence welcome abstracts that are exploratory in nature as well as abstracts of latter-stage research. Above all, we aim to show how the field of early modern classical reception can bear on a wide range of literary and cultural study, and to dispel the notion of an intimidating barrier to entry.

Abstracts of no more than 400 words, suitable for a 15-20 minute presentation, should be sent as an email attachment to ariane.schwartz@gmail.com. All persons who submit abstracts must be SCS members in good standing. The abstracts will be judged anonymously: please do not identify yourself in any way on the abstract page.

Proposals must be received by Friday, March 8, 2019.

Edited 22/12/2019. Presentations:

1. Joseph Farrell, University of Pennsylvania - Introduction
2. Richard Armstrong, University of Houston - Lodovico Dolce’s L’Ulisse: Rethinking Homeric Translation and Reception from the Material to the Imaginary
3. Julia Claire Hernandez, Washington and Lee University - Juan de Mena’s Omero Romançado: On (Not) Translating Homer in the Court of Juan II of Castile
4. William Theiss, Princeton University - The Abbé d’Aubignac and the Death of Homer
5. Nathaniel Hess, University of Cambridge - From Peisistratus to the Papacy – Homeric Translation and Authority in the Reign of Nicholas V
6. Emily Wilson, University of Pennsylvania - Response

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/2020/151/semcr-homer-renaissance

(CFP closed March 8, 2019)

 

 

[SCS PANEL #4] IMPERIAL VIRGIL

Society for Classical Studies (SCS) 2020 Annual Meeting. Washington DC: January 2-5, 2020

Whether one emphasizes his ambivalence or his applause, Virgil was unquestionably the poet of the nascent Roman empire. Like Homer, the Zeus of poets, Virgil was also the magisterial predecessor for all subsequent authors of pastoral, didactic, or epic. He was thus “imperial” in a double sense, as a commentator on the Roman world being transformed by Augustus and as a kind of poetic doppelgänger for the princeps himself.

This panel seeks to explore both aspects of Virgil and his legacy. Topics might include, without being limited to, Virgil’s response to the rise of Augustus and his role in shaping Roman response more broadly; how Virgil’s contemporaries or later authors used his imperial themes to mirror or to create a contrast with their own works and/or times; and the figure of Virgil himself in later literature, including late antique and early modern works.

Abstracts for papers should be submitted electronically as Word documents by March 1, 2019 to Julia Hejduk (Julia_Hejduk@baylor.edu), preferably with the subject heading “abstract_imperial_SCS2020”. The abstracts will be judged anonymously and so should not reveal the author’s name, but the email should provide name, abstract title, and affiliation. Abstracts should be 650 words or fewer and should follow the guidelines for individual abstracts (https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/guidelines-authors-abstracts), except that works cited should be put at the end of the document, not in a separate text box.

Edited 22/12/2019. Presentations:

1. Patricia Craig, The Catholic University of America - Aeneas, Hercules, and Augustus: The Ambiguous Heroes of Virgil’s Aeneid
2. David West, Ashland University - Imperial Venus Venatrix in the Aeneid
3. Adalberto Magnavacca, Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa - Virgil’s Teachings: Competitive Ecphrasis in Stat. Silv. 4.2
4. Vergil Parson, University of Virginia - Imperial Tityrus: Virgil in Calpurnius Siculus
5. Stephanie Quinn, Rockford University - Broch Reads Virgil
6. Vassiliki Panoussi, College of William & Mary - Response

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/2020/151/imperial-virgil

(CFP closed March 1, 2019)

 

 

[SCS PANEL #53] NEO-LATIN IN THE OLD AND NEW WORLDS: CURRENT SCHOLARSHIP

Society for Classical Studies (SCS) 2020 Annual Meeting. Washington DC: January 2-5, 2020

Organized by Frederick J. Booth, Seton Hall University

The AANLS invites proposals for a panel of papers on current research on Neo-Latin texts from around the world to be held at the annual meeting of the Society for Classical Studies (SCS) in Washington, DC in early January 2020. We seek to highlight the variety and depth of Neo-Latin Studies; to underscore the importance of contemporary scholarship in the complex, global field of Neo-Latin literature; and to give scholars an opportunity to share the results of their research with colleagues in the many disciplines that comprise Neo-Latin studies. We welcome papers on all aspects of the study of literary, historical, scholarly, legal, scientific, and technical works written in Latin in the Renaissance and early Modern Period (to about 1800), as well as papers dealing with more recent Neo-Latin works.

Abstracts should be sent (and arrive no later than midnight EST on Saturday, February 23, 2019) to Dr. Frederick J. Booth at boothfre@shu.edu. Abstracts should be a maximum of 650 words (not including a brief bibliography). In accordance with SCS regulations, all abstracts for papers will be read anonymously by three referees. Please follow the instructions for the format of individual abstracts that appear on the SCS web site. In your cover letter or e-mail, please confirm that you are an SCS or AIA member in good standing (and please note your membership number), with dues paid through 2020.

Edited 22/12/2019. Presentations:

1. Bryan Whitchurch, Fordham University - Turks as Trojans: Intertext and Allusion in Ubertino Posculo’s Constantinopolis
2. Annette M. Baertschi, Bryn Mawr College - Exemplarity in Petrarch’s Africa
3. Carl P. E. Springer, University of Tennessee, Chattanooga - Rhyming Rome: Luther’s In Clementem Papam VII 4. John Izzo, Columbia University
Aztec Physicians in Greco-Roman Garb - 5. Benjamin C. Driver, Brown University
Galileo the Immortalizer: Classical Allusions in the Dedication of Sidereus Nuncius
6. Nicolò Bettegazzi, University of Groningen - The Pax Augustea in Facist Italy: A Catholic Response to the Augustan Bimillenary

https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/2020/151/aanls-2020

(CFP closed February 23, 2019)

 

 

[SCS PANEL #51] PROBLEMS IN PERFORMANCE: FAILURE AND CLASSICAL RECEPTION STUDIES

Society for Classical Studies (SCS) 2020 Annual Meeting. Washington DC: January 2-5, 2020

Organizer-Refereed Panel. Organized by Rosa Andújar and Daniel Orrells, King’s College London

Scholars who work on the modern performance and reception history of classical drama have often focused on the manner in which Greek and Roman plays successfully provide modern writers with a ready-made vocabulary for expressing painful and complex realities. This emphasis on the “success” of classical drama in the modern world could arguably be seen as a continuation of a long history of Euro- American philhellenism and idealization of the ancient world.

This panel aims to move away from what may be seen as a partial and skewed history of the performance and reception of Greek and Roman theatre in modernity, which focuses on positive case studies that celebrate the successful adaptation and application of ancient drama in diverse contexts. This panel instead proposes to explore a fuller and more nuanced history, focusing in particular on “failed” moments of classical theatre.

Possible areas of scrutiny include, but are not limited to:

* Invocations of Greek and Roman plays that were received with indifference or with lukewarm interest
* Modern performances of classical plays that “sort of” worked, or received negative receptions
* Moments of bewilderment and puzzlement in modern audiences, stemming from classical references, themes and motifs

In emphasizing scenes of “failed” reception and problems in performance in modernity, we seek to explore a larger question: how does an understanding of such an alternative performance history provide us with a fuller and different history of classical reception in modern theatre and more broadly, in the modern world? Through such an inquiry, this panel aims to unsettle the polarized state of Classical Reception Studies, in which classical texts are viewed on a binary system, as either agents of liberation or oppression. Rather than looking for more examples of how ancient theater has “successfully” administered the power to say the unsayable, we are especially eager for contributions that can help us think about performances which generated problems around conflicted subjectivity – about the awkward and difficult closeness between perpetrators and victims of political and sexual violence; about the complicities between the colonizer and the colonized.

Please send an anonymous abstract for a 20-minute paper as an email attachment to info@classicalstudies.org by February 8, 2019, listing the title of this panel as the subject line of the email. The text of the abstract should not mention the name of the author. Submissions should follow the SCS guidelines for individual abstracts and will be reviewed by the organizers, who will make final selections by the end of March.

Please address questions about the panel to the organizers: rosa.andujar@kcl.ac.uk and daniel.orrells@kcl.ac.uk

Edited 22/12/2019. Presentations:

1. Daniel Orrells, King’s College London - Introduction
2. Ronald J. J. Blankenborg, Radboud University - Discomfort in Performance? Aigeus Seduced in Euripides’s Medea
3. Kay Gabriel, Princeton University - Euripides, Ultra-Moderniste: H. D. and Avant-Garde Failure
4. Edmund V. Thomas, Durham University - Bernini’s Two Theatres and the Trauma of Classical Reception in Seventeenth-Century Rome
5. Peter Swallow, King’s College London - The Birds Doesn’t Take Off: Aristophanes’s Victorian Burlesque and Why It Failed
6. Marios Kallos, University of British Columbia - Challenging Expectations: The Notorious Productions of Peter Sellar’s Ajax and Anatoly Vasiliev’s Medea
7. Melissa Funke, The University of Winnipeg - Dionysus on Tour: Cross-Cultural Performance in a Beijing Opera Bacchae
8. Rosa Andújar, King’s College London - Response

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/2020/151/problems-performance-failure-and-classical-reception-studies

(CFP closed February 8, 2019)

 

 

[SCS PANEL #18] SCREENING TOPOGRAPHIES OF CLASSICAL RECEPTION

Society for Classical Studies (SCS) 2020 Annual Meeting. Washington DC: January 2-5, 2020

Organizers: Stacie Raucci, Union College, and Hunter Gardner, University of South Carolina

The theme of the panel is space and place in the reception of the ancient world on screen. The “spatial turn” has had a prominent role in recent years in scholarly writings in classics. A number of these works have utilized spatial theory as an interpretative framework, including the writings of theorists Michel de Certeau, Michel Foucault, and Henri Lefebvre. Likewise, there has been significant work on space and place in film studies. Yet this theme has been understudied in the reception of the ancient world in film and television. While there are some notable exceptions, there remains much room for work in this area, in particular work that engages with the valuable theoretical frameworks already being used in other areas of classics. Such work is particularly important for the study of the ancient world on screen, given the highly visual nature of the cinematic texts under examination. In light of cinema’s long celebrated capacity to immerse viewers in temporally and geographically ancient spaces, we argue that space and place have become even more important in classical reception than in other areas of film studies. Since the ancient world is being recreated or often (re)imagined, the way cinematic artists envision and frame spaces becomes a noteworthy vehicle for audience engagement with the past.

1. Stacie Raucci, Union College - Introduction & Reverse Archaeology: Constructing Ancient Roman Spaces on Screen
2. Hunter Gardner, University of South Carolina - Visual Archaeology and Spatial Disorientation in Fellini
3. Dan Curley, Skidmore College - A View with (a) Room: Spatial Projections in Ancient and Screen Epic
4. Meredith Safran, Trinity College - Lost in Space: Matrices of Exilic Wandering in the Aeneid and Battlestar Galactica
5. Jon Solomon, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign - Response

 

 

[SCS PANEL #60] SISTERS DOIN’ FOR THEMSELVES: WOMEN IN POWER IN THE ANCIENT WORLD AND THE ANCIENT IMAGINARY

Society for Classical Studies (SCS) 2020 Annual Meeting. Washington DC: January 2-5, 2020

A panel sponsored by the Women’s Classical Caucus for the 2020 annual meeting of the Society for Classical Studies in Washington, D.C.

Organized by Serena S. Witzke (Wesleyan University) and T. H. M. Gellar-Goad (Wake Forest University)

Among the most prominent anxieties expressed in sources from the ancient world are the fears of the wrath of the gods, of the destruction brought on by war, and of women in charge. Oppressed and controlled by the patriarchies of antiquity, women were not often allowed constitutional or legal roles in official affairs, but nevertheless found ways to exercise autonomy and accrue authority in the home, the community, and the state — and in some places and times, women wielded legitimate and public power.

This proposed panel will gather papers exploring both historical expressions of women’s authority and influence (both formal and informal) and the imagined incarnations of women’s power, as well as the intersections of gender, status, ethnos, ability, and power. Panelists might approach the issue through literature both historical and fictive, through art or architecture, through epigraphic evidence or papyri, and through archaeology or material culture. Potential topics include, but are not limited to, empresses and foreign queens; priestesses or philosophers; business proprietors and political campaigners; Hellenistic patronesses and local benefactors; the historiographical and literary figure of the dux femina; elegiac beloveds, hetairai, and meretrices; matronae and other powerful women heads of household; and the ways in which women in subsequent generations have used references to ancient women in power to support their own access to power.

Papers may address questions such as the following: what constitutes legitimate power? In what ways did women exercise influence and authority? What backlash did women face from these expressions of power? How did such women shape their societies and their worlds? What methods can we use to detect and understand women’s wielding of power in situations and contexts dominated by patriarchal oppression and silencing of women’s voices, actions, and experiences? How do status, ethnos, and ability interplay with gender in expressing power and in condemnations of those expressions?

Please send abstracts that follow the guidelines for individual abstracts (see the SCS website) by email to Ms. Julie Pechanek at pechanjn@wfu.edu by March 1, 2019. Ensure that the abstracts are anonymous. The organizers will review all submissions anonymously and inform submitters of their decision by the end of March 2019, with enough time that those not chosen can participate in the SCS’ individual abstract submission process.

Edited 22/12/2019. Presentations:

1. T. H. M. Gellar-Goad, Wake Forest University, and Serena S. Witzke, Wesleyan University - Introduction
2. Catherine M. Draycott, Durham University - If I Say That the Polyxena Sarcophagus was Deisgned for a Woman, Does that Make Me a TERF? Identity Politics and Power Now and Then
3. Alana Newman, Monmouth College - Breaking the Glass Ceiling: Ptolemaic Faience and the Limits of Female Power
4. Krishni Schaefgen Burns, University of Illinois at Chicago - Cornelia’s Connections: Political Influence in Cross-Class Female Networks
5. Morgan E. Palmer, University of Nebraska Lincoln - Always Advanced by Her Recommendations: The Vestal Virgins and Women’s Mentoring
6. Jessica Clark, Florida State University - Chiomara and the Roman Centurion
7. Gunnar Dumke, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg - Basilissa, Not Mahārāni: The Indo-Greek Queen Agathokleia

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/2020/151/sisters-doin-themselves

(CFP closed March 1, 2019)

 

 

[SCS PANEL #85] THEATER OF DISPLACEMENT: ANCIENT TRAGEDY AND MODERN REFUGEES, IMMIGRANTS AND MIGRANTS

CAMP Panel, Society for Classical Studies (SCS) 2020 Annual Meeting. Washington DC: January 2-5, 2020

Organizers: Seth A. Jeppesen, BYU; Chiara Aliberti, BYU; Cecilia Peek, BYU

In Euripides’ Trojan Women, Hecuba and her fellow captives use a wide array of verbs for speaking and singing as they struggle to make their voices and stories heard in the face of repeated attempts by the men in the play to silence them and relegate them to the status of possessions rather than persons. Similar attempts to silence or disregard the plight of modern refugees and migrants are apparent all around us, from the newly energized nationalist movements in Europe to the tear gas canisters lobbed at women and children along the U.S.-Mexico border. As Nadia Murad has shown (The Last Girl, 2017), one of the most powerful ways of combatting this oppression is to open a dialogue and listen to the voices of those displaced by war as they tell us their stories. Bryan Doerries (The Theater of War, 2016) has shown how Greek tragedy can be used to initiate conversations regarding combat trauma, mass incarceration and end-of-life care and encourage recognition and healing for those involved. Luis Alfaro, in turn, has demonstrated in his recent play Mojada how well adaptations of Greek tragedy can address issues facing modern migrants and immigrants. Many Greek tragedies deal with displacement caused by war and characters who seek asylum from other cities and governments (e.g. Aeschylus’ Suppliants, Euripides’ Trojan Women, Hecuba, Andromache, Helen, Suppliant Women, etc.) There is much potential for scholarship and performance that uses Greek tragedy not only to elucidate the current refugee crisis but also to raise awareness and provide healing and understanding to communities. This panel invites papers that explore themes of cultural and physical displacement in Greek Tragedy and potentially draw connections between ancient literature and the current worldwide refugee/migrant crisis. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

* The language of displacement and/or silencing in Greek tragedy
* Greek tragedy and historical displacement in 5th century Greece
* The effects of war and violence in Greek tragedy
* Modern reception of Greek tragedy in the context of refugees, migrants, and immigrants
* Greek tragedy and public humanities projects that deal with issues facing refugees, migrants, and immigrants

Abstracts should follow the SCS guidelines for individual abstracts and can be sent by email to ksburns@uic.edu. Review of abstracts begins March 1, 2019. Abstracts received by March 15 will receive full consideration. Please ensure that the abstracts are anonymous. In accordance with SCS regulations, all abstracts for papers will be read anonymously by the panel organizers, who will serve as referees. Those selected for the panel will be informed by March 30.

Edited 22/12/2019. Presentations:

1. Seth Jeppesen, Brigham Young University - Introduction
2. Hallie Marshall, University of British Columbia - Now We See You, Now We Don’t: Displacement, Citizenship, and Gender in Greek Tragedy
3. Allannah Karas, Valparaiso University - Aeschylus’s Erinyes as Suppliant Immigrants: Enchantment and Subjugation
4. Lana Radloff, Bishop’s University - The Sword, the Box, and the Bow: Trauma, (Dis)placement, and “New Canadians”
5. Sarah J. Thompson, University of California, Davis - How Sweet are Tears: The Uses of Lamentation in the Trojan Women and Queens of Syria
6. Chiara Aliberti, Brigham Young University - Response

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/2020/151/cfp-ancient-tragedy-and-modern-refugees-immigrants-and-migrants

(CFP closed March 15, 2019)

 

 

[SCS PANEL #62] [SEMINAR] TRANSLATING 'EVIL' IN ANCIENT GREEK AND HEBREW AND MODERN AMERICAN CULTURE

Society for Classical Studies (SCS) 2020 Annual Meeting. Washington DC: January 2-5, 2020

Thomas G. Palaima, University of Texas at Austin, Organizer

1. Aren Max Wilson-Wright, University of Zurich - In Search of the Root of All Evil: Is There a Concept of “Evil” in the Hebrew Bible?
2. Diane Arnson Svarlien, Independent Scholar - Just Some Evil Scheme: Translating “Badness” in the Plays of Euripides
3. Thomas G. Palaima, University of Texas at Austin - Evil (Not) Then and Evil Now: A Test Case in “Translating” Cultural Notions

 

 

[SCS PANEL #63] WHAT'S NEW IN OVIDIAN STUDIES?

Society for Classical Studies (SCS) 2020 Annual Meeting. Washington DC: January 2-5, 2020

The International Ovidian Society, a newly formed organization and a new Affiliated Group of the SCS, seeks papers for its panel at the 2020 conference in Washington, D.C. Among the Society’s greatest purposes are to encourage future scholarship on Ovid, to support younger scholars and new work in Ovid, and to reach out beyond Classics to scholars in other fields, as well as to performers and artists, who do significant work related to Ovid and Ovidian reception.

The theme for our 2020 panel is “What’s New in Ovidian Studies?” With this panel, we hope to showcase new approaches to, and new topics in, the study of Ovidian poetry. We encourage all kinds of abstracts and we aim to provide a wide-ranging panel that looks to the future, providing both innovative topics and a broad spread overall of new directions for Ovidian studies.

Send questions to the co-organizers, Sharon James (sljames@unc.edu) and Alison Keith (akeith@chass.utoronto.ca).

Please send an abstract for a 20-minute paper as an email attachment to lfulkerson@fsu.edu by February 8, 2019, listing the title of this panel as the subject line of the email. The text of the abstract should not mention the name of the author, but the email message should provide name, abstract title, and affiliation. Abstracts must be 650 words or fewer and follow the SCS guidelines for individual abstracts (https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/guidelines-authors-abstracts), but should include works cited at the end of the document, not in a separate text box. Submissions will be reviewed by third-party referees, who will make final selections by the end of March.

Edited 22/12/20219. Presentations:

1. Sharon L. James, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill - Introduction
2. Sophie Emilia Seidler, University of Washington - Proserpina’s Pomegranate and Ceres’s Anorexic Anger: Food, Sexuality, and Denial in Ovid’s Account of Ceres and Proserpina
3. Caitlin Hines, Wake Forest University - Ovid’s Visceral Reactions: Lexical Change as Intervention in Public Discourses of Power
4. Chenye (Peter) Shi, Stanford University - Naso Ex Machina: A Fine-Grained Sentiment Analysis of Ovid’s Epistolary Poetry
5. Debra Freas, Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies - Fabula Muta: Ovid’s Jove in Petronius Satyrica 126.18
6. Ben Philippi, University of Tennessee, Knoxville - The Haunting of Naso’s Ghost in Spencer’s Ovidian Intertexts
7. Aislinn Melchior, University of Puget Sound - Reweaving Philomela’s Tongue

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/2020/151/cfp-whats-new-ovidian-studies

(CFP closed February 8, 2019)

 

 

DE/CONSTRUCTING THE BODY: ANCIENT AND MODERN DYNAMICS

University of Liverpool, UK: January 17, 2020

Workshop 1: Fragmentation and Fusion

Join us for the first of three workshops, which explore the ancient and modern body as a biocultural construct. 'De/Constructing the Body: Ancient and Modern Dynamics' is an interdisciplinary project led by Georgia Petridou (Liverpool) and Esther Eidinow (Bristol).

About the Project: Recent post-humanist theories have resulted in a surge of interest on the body as a cultural conception. Moreover, through recent explorations of embodiment, the body, as Csordas (1993, 135) writes, has emerged as “the existential ground of culture”. However, very little attention has been paid to the issue of body as a composite feature, and to debates surrounding corporeal knowledge and relational dynamics. Can the body be construed as one entity or is it really an assemblage of its constituent parts? If the latter, how does the body relate to them? Who determines and controls knowledge about bodies, body parts, and their relational dynamics?

The project engages with these questions and argues for a greater fluidity in both the signification processes and the signifying agents (patients, bodies, body parts, dead bodies, medical scientists, nurses, religious professionals and entrepreneurs, medical insurance policies, medical technology, biopolitics, etc.) that create focus and subsequently define physical and imagined frontiers in the human body. It comprises three exploratory workshops, each on a distinct but interrelated theme, aimed primarily at fostering blue-sky thinking and encouraging close collaborations between experts from the fields of Humanities, Disability Studies, Health and Social sciences.

About this Workshop: This interdisciplinary workshop engages with processes of biocultural mapping of bodies, acknowledges the recursive nature and the diachronicity of body-related debates, and lays emphasis on bodily fragmentation and fusion, two processes crucial to our exercise.

Confirmed participants include: Prof. Patty Baker (Kent), Dr. Sean Columb (University of Liverpool), Dr. Jane Draycott (University of Glasgow), Prof. Esther Eidinow (University of Bristol), Prof. Nicola Denzey Lewis (Claremont Graduate University), Prof. Anna Marmodoro (Durham University/University of Oxford), Dr. Ruth Nugent (University of Liverpool), Dr. Emily Heavey (University of Huddersfield), Prof. Brian Hurwitz (Kings College London), Dr. Georgia Petridou (University of Liverpool), Ms. Anna Socha (University of Liverpool), and Prof. Francesca Stavrakopoulou (University of Exeter).

The event is generously sponsored by the Wellcome Trust.

There is no fee for this event, which is open to all. However, places are limited. If you are planning to attend, please register here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/deconstructing-the-body-ancient-and-modern-dynamics-tickets-86104864969

 

 

WRITING ANCIENT HISTORY IN THE INTERWAR PERIOD (1918-1939)

Newcastle University, UK: January 23-24, 2020

We are delighted to announce the international workshop "Writing Ancient History in the Interwar Period (1918-1939)” that will take place on 23 and 24 January 2020 at Newcastle University.

We aim to investigate the role played by the study of Ancient History (especially of Greece and Rome) in the construction of nationalist narratives in the interwar period (1918-1939). Between the two World Wars, Europe witnessed the propagation of nationalist narratives that heavily relied on idealised images of a distant past. Research in this area has largely focused on the myth of romanità in Fascist Italy and on the reception of Ancient Greece in Nazi Germany. However, scholars have devoted less attention to interpretations of ancient history in other national communities and to possible interactions between different and often competing narratives. By looking at the interactions between Ancient History and nationalism in different geographical areas, this workshop aims to explore the inter-relations of historiographical traditions on a global scale and their impact on political narratives.

The event has been generously funded by the School of History, Classics and Ancient History of Newcastle University, CRASIS (Interdisciplinary Research Institute on the Ancient World, University of Groningen) and Anchoring Innovation (research agenda of the National Research School in Classical Studies, the Netherlands).

Thursday 23rd January 2020
9.00 – 9.45: Registration and Introduction
9.45 – 11: Panel 1
Anna Kouremenos (Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen): Cementing a National Identity: Greece and its Past in the Interwar Period (1918-1939)
Federico Santangelo (Newcastle University): Augustus in Interwar Britain: the pre-Syme consensus
11 – 11.30: Coffee Break
11.30 – 12.45: Panel 2
Stefan Altekamp (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin): Villain and Victim. Punic Carthage in Interwar German History Discourse
Andrea Avalli (Università degli Studi di Genova/ Université de Picardie “Jules Verne”): Interwar Etruscology and Racism in Fascist Italy
12.45 – 14.30: Lunch Break
14.30 – 15.45: Panel 3
Sergey Karpyuk (Russian Academy of Sciences): The Foundation of the Soviet Journal of Ancient History ('Vestnik drevnei istorii') in 1937
Helen Roche (Durham University): Back to the Ancient Greek Future? Greek Antiquity as Paradigm in National Socialist Classical Education
15.45 – 16.15: Coffee Break
16.15 – 17.30: Panel 4
Nathalie de Haan (Radboud Universiteit): I nostri antenati. Ancient History, National History: the Italian case
Manuel Loff (Universidade do Porto): Grandeur, Empire, Race: Uses of the Past in Salazar’s Portugal (1930-1945)
17.30 – 18.30: Discussion
19.30: Conference Dinner

Friday 24th January 2020
9.30 – 11: Panel 5
Sarah Rey (Université de Valenciennes et du Hainaut-Cambrésis (UVHC) : Jérôme Carcopino, directeur de l’École française de Rome (1937-1940) : ses choix politiques et ses choix historiographiques
Ivan Olujić (University of Zagreb): Study of Ancient History in Croatia between the two World Wars
Antonio Duplá Ansuategui (Universidad del País Vasco): From Essentialism towards Professionalisation, and Landing in Ideology: Spanish Historiography on Ancient History in the Interwar Period
11 – 11.30: Coffee Break
11.30 – 13: Conclusions and discussion

The workshop will take place in rooms 2.49/2.50, Armstrong Building, Newcastle University (NE1 8Q8).

The online registration will be opening soon.

For any doubt or queries, please, email interwarworkshop@gmail.com

Nicolò Bettegazzi, PhD Student in Latin Language and Literature, Groningen University
Emilio Zucchetti, PhD Student in Classics and Ancient History, Newcastle University
Prof. Federico Santangelo, Professor of Ancient History, Newcastle University

Website: https://www.ru.nl/oikos/anchoring-innovation/events/agenda/workshop-writing-ancient-history-interwar-period/

Registration: https://webstore.ncl.ac.uk/short-courses/faculty-of-humanities-social-sciences-hass/history-classics-archaeology/writing-ancient-history-in-the-interwar-period-19191938

 

 

CALGACUS IN 2020

UCL/KCL Symposium at Kings College London: January 25, 2020

To mark the septcentenary of the Declaration of Arbroath, recognising Scotland’s independence from England, Tom Mackenzie (UCL) and Edith Hall (KCL) will be convening a one-day symposium on Calgacus and his reception at UCL on Burns Night 2020 (25th January).

Offers of papers are requested (deadline July 19th 2019) to be sent to edith.hall@kcl.ac.uk.

Possible topics include the way Calgacus is presented in commentaries across the centuries on Tacitus’ Agricola, translations of his speech, the way it has informed anti-imperial or nationalist rhetoric subsequently, antiquarian and archaeological studies of the Battle of Mons Graupius, the presentation of Calgacus in the visual arts, fiction, drama, film and documentaries, his role in the Ossianic movement and Celtic revival and the journal Calgacus published by radical Gaelic-speaking poets in the 1970s.

Haggis (including vegetarian), neeps, single malt whisky and a reading of SCOTS WHA HAE promised. Bidh ùine mhath aig a h-uile duine!

Confirmed Speakers include: William Fitzgerald (KCL); Filomena Giannotti (University of Siena); Edith Hall (KCL); Tom Mackenzie (UCL); Alan Montgomery (independent scholar); Giuseppe Pezzini (St Andrews); Melanie Marshal (Oxford).

Registration: https://onlinestore.ucl.ac.uk/conferences-and-events/faculty-of-arts-humanities-c01/department-of-greek-and-latin-f13/f13-calgacus-in-2020

Call: https://www.facebook.com/groups/430896740266607/permalink/2421657764523818/

(CFP closed July 19, 2019)

 

 

AUSTRALASIAN SOCIETY FOR CLASSICAL STUDIES (ASCS) 41ST ANNUAL CONFERENCE

University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand: January 28-31, 2020

CFP: http://www.ascs.org.au/news/ascs41_call_for_papers.html - Deadline: July 31, 2019.

Conference website: https://www.otago.ac.nz/classics/ascs-2020.html

Program: TBA.

Enquiries: Daniel Osland: ASCS2020@otago.ac.nz

ASCS: http://www.ascs.org.au/

(CFP closed July 31, 2019)

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February 2020

[PANEL] IS THIS SPARTA? RECEPTION OF THE ANCIENT WORLD IN CONTEMPORARY MEDIA

108th College Art Association of America (CAA) Annual Conference, Chicago, USA: February 12-15, 2020

In early 2017, Berkeley, CA was witness to a series of demonstrations by right-wing protestors over the cancellation of a talk by Milo Yiannopoulous, some of whom incorporated Spartan-style armor into their outfits. Likewise, the Plutarch quotation "μολὼν λαβέ" has been adopted by the American Gun Rights community as a rallying call for Second Amendment defense. Scholars have increasingly recognized the power of contemporary reception to colour modern views of the ancient world. In this case, Zack Snyder's 2006 film 300 has become a cultural monolith that promotes a hyper-militaristic version of Sparta that is inconsistent with current scholarship. Gillen Kelly's and Bellaire Cowles' graphic novel Three is a notable step towards accuracy, along with Ubisoft's 2018 video game Assassin's Creed: Odyssey, yet both are indebted to the long train of reception that brought Snyder's film into being. With such dissonance between public and academic "fact," what, then, is Sparta?

This panel seeks to address how the reception of antiquity in modern media (broadly defined as visual arts and media post-1800) either counteracts or informs public opinion and knowledge. To that end we solicit proposals on how reception can spawn self-reinforcing narrative traditions, be leveraged in teaching, inspire public interest or, at worst, advance harmful and exclusionary modern agendas. We hope to spur discussion on how to incorporate this phenomenon in teaching, publication, and scholarship, and what our responsibility is as scholars to the larger public conversation. Proposals that feature inter- and multidisciplinary approaches are especially encouraged.

Chairs: Kira Jones - kkjone3@emory.edu and sburges@bu.eduSteven Matthew Burges, Boston University -

Call: https://caa.confex.com/caa/2020/webprogrampreliminary/Session5927.html

(CFP closed July 23, 2019)

 

 

LIVING LATIN AND GREEK IN NYC 2020: "NEGLECTED VOICES"

New York City, NY, USA: February 15-16, 2020

The Paideia Institute is pleased to welcome abstract submissions to the eighth iteration of Living Latin and Greek in New York City. This conference, which features papers delivered in Latin and Ancient Greek as well as small breakout sessions where participants practice speaking Ancient Greek and Latin under the guidance of expert instructors, will be held at Fordham University on February 15th and 16th, 2020.

The theme of this year’s conference is “Neglected Voices.” Which people or groups of people have been neglected, disregarded, or socially excluded throughout the history of Greco-Latinity? What do we know about them, and how do we know what we know? How does exploring their contributions help paint a fuller picture of the Ancient Greek- and Latin-speaking past?

We invite proposals for short talks in Ancient Greek or Latin on this theme with examples from Ancient Greek and Latin literature or material culture. In particular, we welcome proposals that amplify the voices of women, religious or ethnic minorities, slaves, non-elites, those who do not conform with regard to gender or sexuality, and other historically excluded groups. Outstanding submissions on other topics will also be considered, particularly (but not only) if they focus on classical language pedagogy.

Please use the link to send in an abstract of no more than 500 words: https://www.paideiainstitute.org/llinyc_abstract_submission. The deadline for submissions is September 15, 2019. Travel bursaries are available and can be requested through the same link. We encourage accepted speakers to apply for external funding as well since the number of travel bursaries is limited. All talks will be recorded, subtitled, and (with each speaker’s permission) published on Paideia's YouTube channel.

Call: https://www.paideiainstitute.org/llinyc_2020_call_for_papers

(CFP closed September 15, 2019)

 

 

[PANELS] CLASSICAL REPRESENTATIONS IN POPULAR CULTURE

Southwest Popular / American Culture Association (SWPACA) 41st Annual Conference, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA: February 19-22, 2020

Proposals for papers and panels are now being accepted for the 41st annual SWPACA conference. One of the nation's largest interdisciplinary academic conferences, SWPACA offers nearly 70 subject areas, each typically featuring multiple panels. For a full list of subject areas, area descriptions, and Area Chairs, please visit http://southwestpca.org/conference/call-for-papers/.

Classical Representations in Popular Culture

Papers on any aspect of Greek, Roman, or Mediterranean antiquity in contemporary or popular culture are eligible for consideration.

Classical Representations welcomes submissions on a broader range of topics including:

* Cinema directly or indirectly reflecting aspects of the ancient world in cinema: recent films involving Classical themes which you might consider include Game of Thrones, Stranger Things, The Legend of Hercules, Pompeii, Inside Llewyn Davis, the new Ben Hur, as well as television series which engage with classical themes like Doctor Who, Spartacus, Battlestar Galactica.
* Classical Motifs/Allusions/Parallels in Popular Music
* Dance, Ballet, Theater, the Visual Arts
* Children's Literature
* Graphic Novels and Cartoons
* Literary Theory/Postcolonial Theory/Reception Studies: Literary or theoretical analysis of literature employing classical references or motifs, like Anne Carson's Autobiography of Red, or Margaret Atwood's Penelopiad.
* Science Fiction/Fantasy: Analysis of representations of classical history, literature, or philosophy in science fiction movies or books, as Edward Gibbons to Asimov's Foundation Trilogy or the impact of Thucydides in Cold War cinema. Or, conversely, the influence of Science Fiction on representations of the ancient world in later cinema (e.g., how did George Lucas' empire of the Star Wars franchise influence later representations of the Roman Empire?)
* Pedagogy: applications of classics in popular culture: how can we use contemporary films or literature in the classroom?

This year, one panel of Classical Representations will be co-hosted by AIMS (Antiquity in Media Studies, "a new organization dedicated to promoting and supporting scholarship on the ancient world in modern media.") To submit to this panel, please type "Submission to AIMS Panel" at the top of your abstract. If not included in the AIMS panel, your paper will still be considered for inclusion in the regular panels.

All proposals must be submitted through the conference's database at http://register.southwestpca.org/southwestpca

For details on using the submission database and on the application process in general, please see the Proposal Submission FAQs and Tips page at http://southwestpca.org/conference/faqs-and-tips/

Individual proposals for 15-minute papers must include an abstract of approximately 200-500 words. Including a brief bio in the body of the proposal form is encouraged, but not required.

For information on how to submit a proposal for a roundtable or a multi-paper panel, please view the above FAQs and Tips page.

The deadline for submissions is October 31, 2019. As in past years, this may be extended at a later date.

SWPACA offers monetary awards for the best graduate student papers in a variety of categories. Submissions of accepted, full papers are due January 1, 2020. For more information, visit http://southwestpca.org/conference/graduate-student-awards/

Registration and travel information for the conference is available at http://southwestpca.org/conference/conference-registration-information/

In addition, please check out the organization's peer-reviewed, scholarly journal, Dialogue: The Interdisciplinary Journal of Popular Culture and Pedagogy, at http://journaldialogue.org/

If you have any questions about the Classical Representations in Popular Culture area, please contact its Area Chair, Benjamin S. Haller, Virginia Wesleyan University, bhaller@vwu.edu. Presenters from past years, please note that Virginia Wesleyan has recently changed from a College to our University: Ben Haller's Virginia Wesleyan old email posted on past CFPs will no longer work.

Southwest Popular / American Culture Association (SWPACA): http://www.southwestpca.org

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/scs-news/cfp-classical-representations-popular-culture-0

(CFP closed October 31, 2019)

 

 

WESTERN CIVILISATION IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY

University of Adelaide, South Australia: February 20-21, 2020

On 15 March 2019, a self-confessed white supremacist, now standing trial for terrorism and murder, is alleged to have walked into two Christchurch mosques and killed 51 people. The weapons and body armour employed in the attack contained the dates of several events in Crusading history; the manifesto of the alleged perpetrator placed his actions in an imaginary war of east-west, ongoing for a millennium. Ideas of ‘western civilisation’ implicitly situated against ‘other’ civilisations, or perhaps an absence of civilisation altogether, can be argued to have underpinned this attack. The concept of Western Civilisation, with various definitions, thus continues to be prominent in the public sphere. For some, such as the Ramsay Centre which promotes a degree in Western Civilisation, the idea continues to have social and political utility, reflecting a coherent body of knowledge, and their associated values, not least the ‘liberal’ tradition of western democracy. For others, this interpretation of European history can elide the almost continual global encounters and exchange of information that occurred, whilst denying the political uses of ‘western civilisation’ as a discourse of colonialism and imperialism.

This symposium provides a moment to reflect on the concept of Western Civilisation today, not just as a topic of historical interest but an idea that continues to hold a significant political function. What role do the histories that we write and teach play in the production of discourses of ‘western civilisation’ or resistance to it? What role do historians have in shaping ideas about the past in the present? And what responsibility do we have towards ‘western civilisation’ as a discourse? What is the future of ‘Western Civilisation’, both as taught in universities and in the public sphere?

Expressions of interest are now invited that speak to this theme from any discipline, time period or place, and any political perspective. We have a limited number of slots but are interested in proposals for 90-minute panels, roundtables or other creative contributions. We also welcome individual expressions of interest. We encourage submissions from Indigenous people, people of colour, queer people and members of other traditionally marginalised communities. Proposals are welcome from those at all career stages.

Please send expressions of interest to westernciv2020@gmail.com by 18 October 2019.

Edited 22/12/2019. Program:

Day One

10.00 – 10.30 am: Registration

10.30 – 10.55: Welcome

10.55 – 12.00 pm: Keynote. Speaker: Professor Louise D’Arcens, Macquarie University

12.00 – 1.00: Lunch

1.00 – 2.30: The Politics of Western Civilisation Studies
Speakers: Amelia Brown, Tiana Blazevic, Sarah Ferber
This panel is dedicated to some of the political issues surrounding the academic study of Western Civilisation, particularly in the field of Classics and Ancient History. Amelia Brown from the University of Queensland will reflect on some political aspects of the study of Ancient Greece, and its language, literature, art, archaeology and history, as part of the formative narrative of the idea of Western Civilisation. Her focus will be the divergent traditions of the study of Ancient Greece, and especially its monuments, in Greece, the US, and Australia. From the Persian Wars to the Parthenon, she will offer some contrasts on how Ancient Greek culture is selectively politicised in Greece, the US and Australia. Sarah Ferber will be provide a detailed account of the key events and issues which led to the installation at the University of Wollongong of the Bachelor of Arts (Western Civilisation) with funding by the Ramsay Centre for Western Civilisation. In December 2018 the Vice-Chancellor of the University of Wollongong announced that the Sydney-based centre was to provide a $50-million dollar package to install a new degree entitled ‘Bachelor of Arts (Western Civilisation)’. In a significant departure from standard practice, Academic Senate had not been consulted about the new program. Over the following several months, staff and students expressed concern about the executive processes of approval. The UOW experience provides a basis for reflection on the wider politics of the ‘Western Civilisation’ debate in relation to humanities undergraduate teaching in 21st-century Australia, and exposes the limited capacities of high-level regulatory mechanisms in the face of culturally loaded commercial incentives. Tiana Blazevic from the University of Adelaide will discuss how the so-called ‘decline of Western Civilisation studies’ has become a focus of online hate groups and rising anti-intellectualism. In particular, she will discuss how the far right appropriate Ancient Greek and Roman history on social media and blog sites to further their ideas of white supremacy, anti-immigration and misogyny. She will argue that students are more exposed to far-right ‘memes’ and blogs on the ancient world and have greater access to it in today’s rapidly developing digital world rather than academia or traditional historical sources or scholarship.

2.30 – 3.00: Tea break

3.00 – 5.00: Western Civilisation and its Discontents: A Roundtable on Teaching and Pedagogy
Speakers: Tiana Blazevic, Christopher van der Krogt, David McInnia, Helen Young
This roundtable will invite participants and the audience to reflect on the opportunities and problems the concept of ‘western civilisation’ raises in the classroom. Each panellist will first speak briefly (c. 10 minutes each) about their own experience and perspectives; the Chair will then facilitate a conversation between the panellists (c.15-30 minutes); and the discussion will then be opened up to the audience for the rest of the session.
The roundtable will address questions including:
What does ‘western civilisation’ mean for humanities teaching in an Australia/New Zealand university context? How do we integrate diverse views, indigenous and non-western perspectives?
What could bicultural/multicultural teaching and learning look like and how can it strengthen the place of medieval and early modern disciplines and the humanities more broadly?
What strategies can we use to address and respond to controversial / distressing issues in the classroom? Both the ways our disciplines are being co-opted by extremists but also longer term problems of racism and Eurocentrism in our fields.
How do we ensure the emotional, cultural and physical safety of students while fostering robust discussion and critical debate on controversial and potentially sensitive topics?
What practical steps can/should senior faculty, permanent staff and institutional leaders take to protect and support early career and contingent colleagues who engage in politically controversial teaching/research?

5.00 – 6.00: Break

6.00: Western Civilisation in the Twenty-First Century Discussion Panel
Speakers: TBC. Chair: Wilf Prest

Day Two

8.30 – 9.00 am: Registration

9.00 – 10.30: Not a Bi-Polar (Early Modern) World
Speakers: Charles Zika, Nat Cutter
Chair: Sarah Feber
Understandings of Western Civilization and Western Culture rest heavily on notions of their opposite, on what Western Culture is not, and on a unified and coherent notion of “the West”. The “West” in turn originated with the idea of a unified “Europe” and earlier still with that of Christendom, and underestimates the way in which actual political, social and cultural divisions were at odds with such assumptions of unity, and the contemporary calls for or claims of such unity in the face of external pressure or attack.
This panel focuses on two societies at opposite ends of what was to become Europe, England and Austria, and their interaction with the (also deeply divided) Islamic world in the seventeenth century. This was a period when notions of Europe had not yet clearly emerged, when Christendom was wracked with deep divisions, and when the struggle between Christianity and Islam is commonly thought to have reached fever pitch, climaxing with the victory of Christian Europe over Islam at the Siege of Vienna in 1683. An analysis of the engagement of Protestant England with Morocco in this period, and Catholic Austria’s conflict with the Ottomans, demonstrate the oversimplicity of such constructs of a bi-polar world, that features in Orientalist thought, underpins ideas of Western Culture and Western Civilization, and continues to inspire ideologies of white supremacy.

10.30 – 11.00: Tea break

11.00 – 12.30 pm: Western Civilisation and Contemporary Political Discourse
Speakers: Ryan Buesnel, Blaise Dufal, Christopher van der Krogt
The concept of Western Civilisation is now routinely deployed within political discourse, particularly in Australia and New Zealand. This panel explores the uses of concepts of western civilisation by a range of political groups. Blaise Dufal highlights the uses of the concept of ‘civilisation’ within political debates around national identity in France across the twentieth century. Ryan Buesnel explores how these ideas are deployed to support the growth of white supremacism through contemporary heavy metal, particularly in Eastern Europe. Christopher van der Krogt explores how ideas of crusading and Jihad are used to justify contemporary violence, and Rajiv Thind looks at rhetorics of hate in the manifesto of the Christchurch shooter. This panel provides an opportunity to think through issues of how histories of Western Civilisation are activated for political ends.

12.30 – 1.30: Lunch

1.30 – 3.30: Western Civilisation and Media Engagement
Speakers: Simon Royal, Journalist (ABC Adelaide); Tory Shepherd, Political Editor (The Advertiser)
Chair: Claire Walker
This sessions explores how historians engage with the professional media to articulate the histories we produce, and to challenge misconceptions deployed in the public sphere. It particularly reflects on how humanities scholars might provide a counterpoint to narratives that are deployed to support terrorism or racial hatred.

3.30 – 4.00: Closing Discussion

Call/Website: https://westernciv2020.wordpress.com/

(CFP closed 18 October, 2019)

 

 

HISTORICAL FICTIONS RESEARCH CONFERENCE 2020

University of Salzburg, Austria: February 21-22, 2020

Theme: The Forms of History

Historical fictions can be understood as an expanded mode of historiography. Scholars in literary, visual, historical and museum/re-creation studies have long been interested in the construction of the fictive past, understanding it as a locus for ideological expression. However, this is a key moment for the study of historical fictions as critical recognition of these texts and their convergence with lines of theory is expanding into new areas such as the philosophy of history, narratology, popular literature, historical narratives of national and cultural identity, and cross-disciplinary approaches to narrative constructions of the past.

Historical fictions measure the gap between the pasts we are permitted to know and those we wish to know: the interaction of the meaning-making narrative drive with the narrative-resistant nature of the past. They constitute a powerful discursive system for the production of cognitive and ideological representations of identity, agency, and social function, and for the negotiation of conceptual relationships and charged tensions between the complexity of societies in time and the teleology of lived experience. The licences of fiction, especially in mass culture, define a space of thought in which the pursuit of narrative forms of meaning is permitted to slip the chains of sanctioned historical truths to explore the deep desires and dreams that lie beneath all constructions of the past.

We welcome paper proposals from Archaeology, Architecture, Literature, Media, Art History, Musicology, Reception Studies, Museum Studies, Recreation, Gaming, Transformative Works and others. We welcome paper proposals across historical periods, with ambitious, high-quality, inter-disciplinary approaches and new methodologies that will support research into larger trends and which will lead to more theoretically informed understandings of the mode across historical periods, cultures and languages.

We aim to create a disciplinary core, where researchers can engage in issues of philosophy and methodology and generate a collective discourse around historical fictions in a range of media and across period specialities.

Keynote speakers:
Dr Michael Brauer, University of Salzburg, “Cooking up Salzburg”
Prof Dr Gerhard Kubik and Dr Moya Aliya Malamusi, University of Vienna, “Works and Biographies of East and Central African Musicians”.

Send abstracts of no more than 250 words to: historicalfictionsresearch@gmail.com (5th September 2019; no pdfs, please).

Website: https://historicalfictionsresearch.org/hfrn-conference-2020/
Twitter: @HistoricalFic

(CFP closed Septmeber 5, 2019)

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March 2020

THE ANCIENT MEDITERRANEAN FOR MODERN AUDIENCES: RECEPTION, PEDAGOGY, ENTERTAINMENT

Ohio State University (OSU) Classics Graduate Student Colloquium

Ohio Union, Columbus, Ohio, USA: March 6-7, 2020

The aim of the OSU Classics Graduate Student Colloquium is to explore various directions in which the Ancient Mediterranean has been adapted and utilized by different cultures in Modern world from the Renaissance to the present day. In recent years, the online journal “Eidolon” and other public scholarship media have already successfully demonstrated how the cultures of the Ancient Mediterranean can be accessed, interpreted, and applied through various experiences by scholars, students, writers, and by the wider communities. We believe that the reception of Ancient Mediterranean cultures has become an important element of Classical scholarship and pedagogy. It is a critical point of contact between the academic community and the general audience.

The OSU Classics Graduate Student Colloquium invites papers on a range of topics that discuss and analyze the reception of the Ancient Mediterranean from a point of view of philology, linguistics, theater and performance studies, history, pedagogy, archaeology, art history, philosophy, anthropology, political studies, media studies, and/or gender studies. Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

* Reception of the Ancient Mediterranean in literary traditions of different countries, nations, and cultures
* Ancient Theatre on the modern stage
* Texts of the Ancient Mediterranean in translations
* The Ancient Mediterranean in visual culture
* Reception of the Ancient Mediterranean in new media: social networks and online communities
* Representation of the Ancient Mediterranean in video games
* Use of Ancient Mediterranean images in marketing
* Modern and post-modern philosophy and its use of Classics
* Classics in politics and propaganda
* Reception of Ancient Mediterranean cultures and its use in the classroom
* Classical pedagogy as the reception of Ancient Mediterranean cultures

We are excited to announce that Dr. Zara Torlone, Professor (Classics and Havighurst Center for Russian and Post-Soviet Studies, Miami University) will be presenting a keynote lecture entitled “Joy of Exile: Ovid and Russian Poets".

All submissions should include 1) an abstract not exceeding 300 words and 2) a brief CV or academic bio not exceeding one page. We ask that all submissions and inquiries be sent to: osuclassicscolloquium@gmail.com.

DATES:
Deadline for submissions: Monday, November 18th, 2019
Will notify all applicants: Monday, December 2nd, 2019
Colloquium: Friday, March 6th - Saturday, March 7th, 2020

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/scs-news/cfp-ancient-mediterranean-modern-audiences

(CFP closed November 18, 2019)

 

 

[PANEL] RECEPTION STUDIES: STATE OF THE DISCIPLINE AND NEW DIRECTIONS

American Comparative Literature Association Annual Meeting, Chicago USA: March 19-22, 2020

Deadline for submissions: Current ACLA guidelines specify that each ACLA member may submit only ONE PAPER for consideration. Abstracts must be received by Monday, September 23, 2019 at 9 a.m. EST. Please submit your abstract via the ACLA portal. We have space for 8-12 papers (2 or 3-day seminar format of 4 papers per day).

Organizer: Michelle Zerba (mzerba@michellezerba.com)
Co-Organizer: Anastasia Bakogianni (a.bakogianni@massey.ac.nz)

Reception studies have made a significant impact on the field of literature and helped build new bridges for dialogue across historical periods and disciplines, including theater, film, and art history. This panel invites papers that reflect upon the theories and methodologies of reception studies and our interdisciplinary connections to fields such as comparative literature, adaptation studies, cultural studies, and media studies. We seek to investigate the current state of the discipline, to debate where its boundaries might lie, and to explore what kinds of cross-disciplinary dialogue lie ahead in this exciting and fruitful nexus of scholarly endeavor.

In particular, the panel seeks to address a series of key questions. What are the central concepts that guide inquiry in reception studies and related fields? What kinds of research have they enabled, and how has this research enriched the exploration of comparative literature, national literature, theater, and film in an age that sees itself as global? Are these concepts in need of critique, and if so, how? Why have certain disciplines like classics assumed a prominent place in reception studies? What concerns should reception, adaptation, and media studies be addressing?

The panel aims to interrogate the very processes of reception, and actively seeks to complicate the notion of a pure source text or point of origin, thus helping to dissolve hard boundaries between text, reception, tradition, and interpretive communities. Papers may engage with these questions theoretically and / or through an examination of texts. Possible topics include but are not limited to the role of the scholar or artist in the process of reception, the concept of juxtaposition, the uses of myth, the implications of orality, and the possibility of “masked” receptions where the nature of the connection between points of reference is unclear. We welcome papers that problematize the notion of a western canon and actively seek to push the geographical boundaries of reception as both a local and a global phenomenon.

Call: https://www.acla.org/reception-studies-state-discipline-and-new-directions

(CFP closed September 23, 2019)

 

 

LANDSCAPE AND IDENTITY: INTERDISCIPLINARY EXPLORATIONS OF BEING IN THE WORLD (PG & ECR WORKSHOP)

Durham University (UK): March 26-27, 2020

The interrelation between human identities and the landscapes and environments they inhabit is recognised in many disciplines throughout the Arts and Humanities and Social Sciences. With different disciplinary histories, backgrounds, research traditions, and paradigms, all these disciplines employ their own theories, approaches, and methods to study the link between landscapes, environments, and human identities across time and space. However, they all share common interests as well.

On the occasion of the establishment of Durham University’s interdisciplinary Landscape, Environment, and Identity Research Network, this workshop will provide a platform for cross-disciplinary conversations and collaborations aimed at the integration of different theories on, approaches to, and research methods for exploring the interrelations between landscape, environment, and identity. This workshop will offer an opportunity for PhD students and Early Career Researchers from a range of disciplines to come together and share their research on landscape and identity beyond their own discipline. We mean to investigate challenges to such interdisciplinary studies (e.g. due to different research traditions) and to discuss solutions to these issues. Our discussions are intended to form the basis of a collective output and to encourage future collaborations.

By bringing together researchers from various disciplinary backgrounds, including but not limited to Anthropology, Archaeology, Classics and Ancient History, Modern Languages, and Geography, we want to consider the following questions from a range of perspectives and disciplines:

* How are the terms landscape and identity used and problematised across disciplines, and what issues arise from these ideas? * How are different identities established through human interaction with
landscape or environment?
* What (combination of) methods and approaches may we employ to analyse and interpret this interrelation between identity, landscapes and environments, whether real or imagined, urban, industrial, or natural?
* How is human identity or sense of self affected when a landscape or environment changes, for instance due to war or conflict, political developments, natural disasters, tourism, climate change, etc.?
* How does this in turn affect their interactions and/or relations with other peoples?
* How can our academic research into different landscapes, environments and identities help address current issues in wider society, such as the dynamics between local and global identities, and our relation to a changing world that is subject to climate change?

We invite abstracts for 20-minute papers that address these questions from any perspective. Potential topics could include (but are not limited to): identity in relation to (changing) political, built and natural environments or landscapes; the shaping of the self and the environment; and the intersection between landscape, identity and topics such as memory, emotion, gender, and sensory experiences (e.g. sound, smell, or taste).

Following the workshop, we will seek to produce one or more collective outputs, both academic and non-academic, based on the contents of the papers. The exact form will depend on the ambitions and contributions of participants, but could include the following:
* An edited book
* A special issue of an interdisciplinary journal
* An online blog
* A piece for The Conversation

If you would like to join the discussion and present a paper at this workshop, please send an abstract of up to 250 words to landscape.identity.durham@gmail.com before 5pm (GMT) on Friday 15 November 2019. Thanks to a generous contribution from our sponsor, Durham University’s Institute of Advanced Study, there will be no conference fee. Lunch and refreshments will be provided. Applicants will be selected and notified by mid-December 2019.

For more information, please visit our website: https://landscapeidentitydurham.wordpress.com/ or email us at the above email address. You can also follow us on Twitter: @LandscapeDurham

NB. We are committed to making the event as inclusive as possible, so please do get in touch directly with the organisers via landscape.identity.durham@gmail.com if you have any enquiries regarding access, and for any further information.

The organisation team:
Esther Meijer, Classics and Ancient History,
Floor Huisman, Cambridge Archaeological Unit,
James Coxon, Anthropology,
Vicky J. Penn, English Studies,
Diego Astorga, Geography,
Christoph Doppelhofer, Geography

Call: https://landscapeidentitydurham.wordpress.com/

(CFP closed November 15, 2019)

 

 

(A)SYNCHRONY: RECURRENCE, REVERSAL, AND RESISTANCE

Art & Archaeology Department, Princeton University, NJ: March 26-28, 2020

The Department of Art and Archaeology at Princeton University is thrilled to announce a three-day graduate symposium, “(A)Synchrony: Recurrence, Reversal, and Resistance,” which will be held Thursday, March 26 to Saturday, March 28, 2020.

Certain figures, forms, images, methods, and techniques recur in both cultural production and scholarly discourses, often leading to socio-political, historical, or cultural reversals and/or illuminating resistance and dissent. How might exploring these phenomena allow us to broaden our investigations in the histories of art and culture? How do they manifest themselves as synchronies or asynchronies, understood as harmonizations or dissonances of social and artistic production across time, space, and bodies? Answering these questions may help us create analytic frameworks not bound by regions or nation-states, but that stretch across the world, expose the social construction of temporalities, and challenge periodization and other forms of fixed categorization.

This conceptual framework may help address vital issues in current debates across particular subfields and disciplines, such as: how we can reimagine the concept of Nachleben productively for our increasingly global discipline; how literary or visual histories have been reused or repurposed to mitigate or rebel against external power structures and cultural paradigms; or how some modern and contemporary artists throughout various diasporas create collective memories by referring to the experiences of their ancestors in their work.

Princeton’s Art and Archaeology Graduate Symposium will explore the ways in which recurrence, reversals, and resistance serve as powerful tools in cultural production across disciplines through the conceptual frameworks of synchrony and asynchrony. Submissions from all disciplines are welcomed to engage with these issues by way of, but not limited to, the following broader themes:

* Cultural heritage used to underscore and legitimize a power shift;
* Support for or resistance to the empire demonstrated through the appropriation and modification of imperial imagery by those outside of the metropole;
* The fabrication of visual or material culture to envisage a desired or inaccessible past;
* The inheritance, construction, and questioning of workshop lineages;
* Repurposing “classical” or “traditional” imagery or inverting subject matter to destabilize geopolitical, social, and symbolic conventions;
* Usage of visual tropes as tools to explore and articulate individual identity and positionality;
* Revolutionary potentialities of retrospection for social and political critique;
* Re-enactments or critiques of prior exhibitions, objects, or performances

Please submit a working title, an abstract of no more than 300 words, and a two page CV in a single PDF to gradsymp@princeton.edu by Friday, November 1, 2019. Symposium presentations should be no more than twenty minutes in length. Accepted participants will be notified by January 1, 2020, and limited travel funds are available.

Deadline for abstracts: November 1st 2019 to gradsymp@princeton.edu

Call: [pdf] https://plas.princeton.edu/sites/plas/files/resource-links/princeton_aa_call_for_papers.pdf

(CFP closed November 1, 2019)

 

 

RES DIFFICILES: A CONFERENCE ON CHALLENGES AND PATHWAYS FOR ADDRESSING INEQUITY IN THE ANCIENT GREEK AND ROMAN WORLD

Campus of the University of Mary Washington (Fredericksburg, Virginia), HCC 136: March 27, 2020

Organizers: Hannah Çulik-Baird (Boston University) and Joseph Romero (University of Mary Washington)

One of the great benefits of the shift from a pedagogue-centered to a student-aware or student-centered classroom is that we listen more attentively to how our students experience the content of what we read. A decided strength of Classical Studies is the simultaneous proximity and distance—temporally, geographically, ideologically—of the ancient Greek and Roman world. That distance is felt more keenly when potentially difficult subjects (res difficiles) in our readings—domination, inequity, violence both sexual and otherwise—present themselves for inspection. Often the underlying source of the dissonance or disconnect is the distance in our perceptions of social justice.

In a conference held on the campus of the University of Mary Washington (Fredericksburg, Virginia), we examine the challenges presented by this curriculum with students who are increasingly more diverse in gender identity, race, ethnicity, income, family structure, and more. And while the society of our conference will examine pedagogical issues, we hope also to dilate outward to broader issues in education and society from (a) the current and future roles of Classics and the humanities in K-12 and higher education to (b) the ultimate goals of education.

Our keynote speaker will be Dani Bostick who teaches Latin in Winchester, VA, and who has garnered a national reputation as a writer, teacher, and advocate for victims of sexual violence. Learn more at danibostick.net.

We hope the conference will be attended by as many as possible in person, but a number (limited only by our subscription capacity), will be able to attend electronically.

Abstracts of 350 words should be sent electronically to Joseph Romero (jromero@umw.edu) by November 1, 2019.

Papers will be 30 minutes long with coordinated discussion at the end of each session. Any questions regarding abstract submission may be addressed to Professor Romero or Professor Çulik-Baird (culik@bu.edu). For more information see the conference website.

Website: https://cas.umw.edu/clpr/resdifficilesconference/

(CFP closed November 1, 2019)

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April 2020

[PANEL] CYCLICAL CLASSICAL: REBIRTHS, RENAISSANCES, AND REINVENTIONS OF ANTIQUITY

Association for Art History’s 46th Annual Conference

Newcastle University & Northumbria University, UK: 1-3 April, 2020

Session Convenors: Nicole Cochrane (University of Hull) N.C.Cochrane@2014.hull.ac.uk; Melissa Gustin (University of York) mlg519@york.ac.uk

If, as Aby Warburg said, ‘Every age has the renaissance of antiquity that it deserves’, what is the renaissance of antiquity that we deserve today? And how does that differ – if it does – from earlier renaissances and antiquities? Whether it be a 3D print of Aphrodite, Antinous as symbol of gay pride or the Photoshop of Donald Trump as Perseus triumphantly holding aloft a Gorgon-portrait of Hilary Clinton, in contemporary art, t-shirts, and the internet, the material remains of the classical world continue to permeate modern visual culture.

Following on from international exhibitions, internet discourse around the use of the antique, and recent texts by scholars such as Elizabeth Prettejohn and Caroline Vout among many others, we propose a session that engages seriously with the material remains of antiquity in art to explore the ways in which the art of the ancient world has been adapted, interpreted, and repurposed throughout history. By proposing an open time frame we hope to encourage a discussion on the dialogues formed between classical art and its receptions, questioning how issues such as gender, race, status and class, as well as political, environmental and historical factors, have impacted the use and reuse of the past. This panel will explore the constant rediscovery, reinvention, and reworking of antique material, methods, and models in different media, and invites papers from any period or medium that address questions of the ‘classical’, historic or present.

Submit a paper

Please email your paper proposals direct to the session convenors above, using the Paper Proposal Form.

You need to provide a title and abstract (250 words maximum) for a 25-minute paper (unless otherwise specified), your name and institutional affiliation (if any).

Please make sure the title is concise and reflects the contents of the paper because the title is what appears online, in social media and in the printed programme.

You should receive an acknowledgement receipt of your submission within two weeks from the session convenors.

Deadline for submissions: Monday 21 October 2019

Call: https://forarthistory.org.uk/our-work/conference/2020-annual-conference/cyclical-classical/

(CFP closed 21 October, 2019)

 

 

[RSA PANEL] ANTIQUARIAN NETWORKS IN 16TH CENTURY ROME AND THE BEGINNINGS OF ARCHAEOLOGY

Renaissance Society of America, Philadelphia, PA: April 2-4, 2020

Scholarly research in the humanities has long used a diversity of sources for the better understanding of its subjects. Information gathered from and about objects, persons, documents and ideas from professional networks were used to compare drawings and buildings, sculptures and inscriptions, texts and coins closely related to each other. In recent decades, this well-established methodology became regarded as an expression of Latour's "Actor Network Theory". Today, research exclusively based on "ANT" is however no longer limited to social or professional networks. This former narrow scope should and could be extended (again) and redefined to include Renaissance antiquarianism as a "network of networks", gathering information from all kinds of material and textual sources and combining them to reconstruct an initial or improved picture of ancient Roman past and culture. This three-panel session aims to bring together scholars from a wide range of fields, for example numismatics, epigraphy, art, archaeology, architecture, political, historical, religious and cultural studies (and their histories) as well as socially orientated historical network analysis. It is one of our aims to demonstrate how antiquarians combined information and created new interpretations of texts and artifacts to generate new knowledge. By exploring how they communicated their findings and developed new analytical methodologies, the session could help to investigate if and how to predate the beginnings of scholarly archaeology and scientific methodology from the 18th (cf. e.g. Alain Schnapp) to the 16th century. After all, antiquarian methodological approaches were very modern indeed and possibly even predated such a development in the natural sciences (cf. Rens Bod). In addition, antiquarian research networks were not only interested in the creation of scholarly knowledge out of mere curiosity. The purpose was to learn from antiquity as a source for practical solutions for contemporaneous and future problems — as was successfully achieved by Tolomei's «Accademia de lo Studio de l'Architettura» headed by Marcello Cervini.

The 3-part session will be organized by Drs. Andrea Gáldy (Munich/London; Seminar «Collecting and Display»), Damiano Acciarino (Toronto/Venice), and Bernd Kulawik (Zurich/Berlin; www.accademia-vitruviana.net).

Please send proposals of less than 300 words for a 20 min papers and a short cv until July 16, 2019, to Bernd Kulawik (be_kul@me.com).

Call: https://www.rsa.org/blogpost/1780396/326042/Antiquarian-Networks-in-16th-century-Rome-and-the-Beginnings-of-Archaeology

(CFP closed July 16, 2019)

 

 

[RSA PANEL] [SEMCR PANEL] CLASSICAL ORIGINS OF RENAISSANCE AESTHETICS

Renaissance Society of America, Philadelphia, PA: April 2-4, 2020

As an Associate Organization of the Renaissance Society of America, the Society for Early Modern Classical Reception (SEMCR) welcomes proposals for papers to be delivered at the 2020 meeting of the Renaissance Society of America in Philadelphia, PA. For one of its panels, SEMCR invites abstracts on the reception of classical theories of poetics and aesthetic experience in Renaissance art and music.

Plato's and Aristotle's theories of mimesis, Horace's Ars Poetica, and "Longinus"'s sublime have long dominated discussions of early modern aesthetics. Scholars have also sought to trace the influence of other, less explicitly didactic texts in defining the origin and value of art and the aesthetic experience in the Renaissance. Paul Barolsky, for example, has argued that Ovid's Metamorphoses lies at the heart of Renaissance aesthetics, whether in the story of Pygmalion bringing art to life or, conversely, Medusa's petrifaction of the living as competing metaphors for sculpture. Barolsky likewise sees Ovidian transformation behind Michelangelo's "non finito" and in the depiction of Botticelli's Chloris becoming Flora in the Primavera. Wendy Heller has explored the ways in which Monteverdi and Busenello's groundbreaking opera L'incoronazione di Poppea draws upon and challenges Tacitus' methods of historiography. More recently, Sarah Blake McHam has argued for the pervasive influence of Pliny's Natural History and its emphasis on life-like "naturalism" from Petrarch to Caravaggio and Poussin.

Building on these and other studies that move beyond questions of classical influence on the subject matter of Renaissance texts, this panel seeks papers that explore the strategies through which visual artists and musicians draw on classical aesthetics and the extent to which these hidden roots underlie Renaissance theory and practice.

The Society is committed to creating a congenial and collaborative forum for the infusion of new ideas into classics and early modern studies, and hence welcomes abstracts that are exploratory in nature as well as abstracts of latter-stage research.

Abstracts of no more than 150 words and a short CV of no more than 300 words should be sent as separate email attachments to caroline.stark@howard.edu (see the RSA's abstract guidelines and CV guidelines and models). The abstracts will be judged anonymously: please do not identify yourself in any way on the abstract page. Proposals must be received by August 1, 2019 extended deadline August 10, 2019.

Please include in the body of the email:
• your name, affiliation, email address
• your paper title (15-word maximum)
• relevant keywords

Call: https://www.rsa.org/blogpost/1780396/327928/Classical-Origins-of-Renaissance-Aesthetics

(CFP closed August 10, 2019)

 

 

[RSA PANEL] EXHAUSTED WITH ANTIQUITY: A SYMPTOM OF EARLY MODERN INVENTION

Renaissance Society of America, Philadelphia, PA: April 2-4, 2020

Where and when did early modern artists, architects, and writers begin to show signs of fatigue with the models of the classical past, and what kinds of creative experiments developed in response? Renaissance scholarship has long since moved beyond an understanding of its period as one defined first and foremost by a revival of antiquity. Although the significance of antiquarianism and classicism to manifold developments in early modern art and culture remains incontrovertible, both of those projects also met with productive resistance.

We invite papers addressing works of art or literature that reveal an exhaustion with antiquity and a conscious attempt to develop alternative modes, forms, and principles of invention. Especially welcome are proposals for papers that consider competing notions of the past, the distinction between ‘antique’ and ‘modern’, the political and cultural implications of the choice to forgo classical models, and the reasons why antiquity may have come to be perceived as an exhausted source in the context of certain moments and localities.

To submit a paper proposal please provide the following by email to Marisa Bass (marisa.bass@yale.edu) and Carolyn Yerkes (yerkes@princeton.edu) by 22 July 2019: – your name and institutional affiliation – paper title (15-word maximum) – abstract (150-word maximum) – keywords – curriculum vitae (up to 5 pages) – PhD completion date (past or future).

Call: https://www.rsa.org/blogpost/1780396/326084/Exhausted-with-Antiquity-A-Symptom-of-Early-Modern-Invention

(CFP closed July 22, 2019)

 

 

[RSA PANEL] [SEMCR PANEL] HOMER IN THE RENAISSANCE

Renaissance Society of America, Philadelphia, PA: April 2-4, 2020

As an Associate Organization of the Renaissance Society of America, the Society for Early Modern Classical Reception (SEMCR) invites proposals for papers to be delivered at the 2020 meeting of the Renaissance Society of America in Philadelphia, PA. For one of its panels, SEMCR invites abstracts on the reception of Homer in all its manifestations in the early modern world.

The last fifteen years have seen an explosion in studies of the scholarly and creative reception of Homer in the Renaissance. Work by scholars including Marc Bizer, Tania Demetriou, Philip Ford, Filippomaria Pontani, and Jessica Wolfe--to name but a few--has illuminated the manuscript and print transmission of the Homeric texts and revealed the enormous range of contexts in which Homer was put to use and the immense variety of artistic, cultural, political, philosophical, and theological issues the Homeric poems were used to explore. Today it is possible to investigate questions in Homeric reception that would have been difficult to ask, let alone answer, fifteen years ago.

Proposals may address (but are not limited to) the transmission, translation, or book history of the Homeric texts; the commentary tradition; artistic, literary, or musical responses to Homer; political, philosophical, or scientific uses of Homer. We welcome the consideration of topics including the perspectives Homeric reception provides on Renaissance philology, knowledge of Greek or of oral composition, or the reconfiguration of literary or cultural histories; the discovery of Homer as a source of innovation or inspiration in a wide range of genres and media, or as an alternative to the authority of Latin poets or Roman culture; the geographical, political, or religious factors that influenced Homeric reception in different areas or communities, and the myriad uses to which the Homeric poems were put to explore those factors; the ways in which digital technologies might influence our understanding of Homer's Renaissance reception.

The Society is committed to creating a congenial and collaborative forum for the infusion of new ideas into classics and early modern studies, and hence welcome abstracts that are exploratory in nature as well as abstracts of latter-stage research. Above all, we aim to show how the field of early modern classical reception can bear on a wide range of literary and cultural study, and to dispel the notion of an intimidating barrier to entry.

Abstracts of no more than 150 words and a short CV of no more than 300 words should be sent as an email attachment to caroline.stark@howard.edu (see the RSA's abstract guidelines). The abstracts will be judged anonymously: please do not identify yourself in any way on the abstract page. Proposals must be received by August 1, 2019 extended deadline August 10, 2019.

Please include in the body of the email:
• your name, affiliation, email address
• your paper title (15-word maximum)
• relevant keywords

Call: https://www.rsa.org/blogpost/1780396/327927/Homer-in-the-Renaissance

(CFP closed August 10, 2019)

 

 

[RSA PANEL] RENAISSANCE ECHOES: THE AFTERLIFE OF A MYTH

Renaissance Society of America, Philadelphia, PA: April 2-4, 2020

Among literatures, arts, philosophy, and psychology, the mythological figure of Narcissus has become a common topic of interest; quite the opposite can be said of Echo, the nymph sentenced by divine law to repeat fragments of another’s voice. Yet, in the original Ovidian myth, Echo plays a remarkable role that frames the whole Narcissus’ episode. This panel aims at exploring Echo’s mythological echoes in Renaissance literature, art, theater, and music from different perspectives:

Translations, receptions, reinterpretations of the Ovidian myth;
Echo voices in the pastoral genre;
Echo as rhetorical and musical device;
Echo as form of intertextual reference/literary allusions;
Echo as the embodiment of the lyrical subject or of the author’s voice.

We welcome proposals for 20-minute papers on (but not limited to) the above-mentioned topics. Please send abstracts with paper title (maximum 150-words-long), a short bio, your affiliation, keywords, and general discipline area to the organizers, Giulia Cardillo (cardilgx@jmu.edu) and Simona Lorenzini (simona.lorenzini@yale.edu) by July 31st, 2019.

Call: https://www.rsa.org/blogpost/1780396/323725/CfP-Renaissance-Echoes-the-Afterlife-of-a-Myth

(CFP closed July 31, 2019)

 

 

2020 WARWICK NUMISMATIC DAY: THE WORLD IN YOUR HANDS. NEW DIRECTIONS IN NUMISMATIC RESEARCH.

University of Warwick, UK: April 3, 2020

Department of Classics and Ancient History Warwick, in conjunction with The Royal Numismatic Society.

Conference Organisers: Charlotte Mann and Clare Rowan

Plenary Speaker: Prof. Fleur Kemmers (Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main)

Coins, banknotes, tokens and other forms of money are often portable objects that can be held in the hand; indeed modern day medallic artists tell us that these objects are designed to be held in the hand. But although small and at times unassuming, these media carry and convey an extraordinary array of information; by holding a coin in your hand one might argue you are holding your world.

This conference explores what the unique contribution of numismatics is to our understanding of human society. Money, coinage, bank notes, tokens and medals across the ages have played political, cultural, religious, memorial, economic and social roles; often they provide a unique insight into particular communities, cultures and societies. A key focus of the conference will be exploring the intersection of numismatics, the study of money, with disciplines such as history, classics, art history, sociology, and economics. Papers on any topic related to the theme are welcome, but some key questions for the day include:

• What does numismatic imagery reveal about the exchange of cultural ideas and artistry between people?
• What does numismatic imagery reveal about the way societies negotiated their relationship with their ruling power?
• How does money contribute to identity and a sense of belonging?
• What do the location of coin finds reveal about the movement of people and their economic interactions?
• How do particular forms of payment media reflect social hierarchies, and how do social relationships reshape money?
• How is money used beyond the economic sphere within belief systems and rituals?
• How does money act as a type of media, storing and conveying information, as well as mediating human relations?

We invite abstracts of no more than 250 words from early career scholars (PhD students, postdoctoral researchers, assistant professors, early career heritage sector employees, etc) to be submitted to Charlotte Mann (C.Mann@warwick.ac.uk) by 29th November 2019. Due to the generosity of Warwick University's 'Connecting Cultures' GRP, we are able to offer modest bursaries to assist speakers with travel and accommodation costs.

The conference will be preceded by a workshop on 'Applying for German Funding' lead by Prof. Dr. Fleur Kemmers on Thursday 2/4/2020, which is also open to all attendees.

We are grateful to the Humanities Research Centre at the University of Warwick for their generous financial support.

Call: https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/classics/research/interests/numismatics/numismaticday/numismaticworld

(CFP closed November 29, 2019)

 

 

ANCIENT PLASTER: CASTING LIGHT ON A FORGOTTEN SCULPTURAL MATERIAL

London (The British Academy): April 6-7, 2020

Marble, bronze, and terracotta are all celebrated materials for sculpture in the round. However, plaster, another noteworthy material in antiquity, is understudied and often absent from the archaeological record. Two major questions regarding the role of plaster in ancient sculpture remain unresolved. This conference, bringing together international experts including archaeologists, conservators, and contemporary sculptors, aims to tackle these debates. Firstly, we will explore plaster as a sculptural material in its own right and address the use of plaster models for the production of works in other media. Secondly, we will tackle the contested issue of life-casting in antiquity, assessing whether such casting was indeed used in the production of bronzes. Demonstrations of plaster working and casting processes will give participants a practical understanding of material and technique. This interdisciplinary practice based focus will facilitate collaboration between archaeologists and contemporary practitioners, enabling cooperative analysis of these important and unresolved research problems.

Convenors:
Emma Payne, King's College London
Abbey Ellis, University of Leicester/Ashmolean Museum
Will Wootton, King's College London

Speakers include:
Tonny Beentjes, University of Amsterdam, Netherlands
Farhad Fabian Burg, Gipsformerei der Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Germany
Amanda Claridge, Royal Holloway, University of London
Chris Dorsett, Northumbria University Jane Fejfer, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
Martin Hanson, Wimbledon College of Art
Nigel Konstam, Verrocchio Arts Centre, Italy
Dimitri Laboury, University of Liège, Belgium
Kenneth Lapatin, J. Paul Getty Museum, USA
Alexander Lumsden, Bronze Age Foundry
Rachel Mairs, University of Reading
Eckart Marchand, The Warburg Institute/International Research Group ‘Bilderfahrzeuge’
Thomas Merrett, City & Guilds of London Art School
Kathryn Tubb, University College London
Clare Venables, Minerva Stone Conservation

Registration: A registration fee is payable at the time of booking.
Standard Admission: £75 both days, £40 one day. Includes lunch and refreshments
Concessions: £35 both days, £20 one day. Includes lunch and refreshments
The concession rate applies to: unwaged / retired / early career academics (within three years of completing PhD) / students / disabled.
Free entrance is offered to companions or carers of disabled visitors.

Registration: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/ancient-plaster-casting-light-on-a-forgotten-sculptural-material-tickets-83323243063

 

 

COLLECTORS AND SCHOLARS. THE NUMISMATIC WORLD IN THE LONG 19TH CENTURY

University of Tübingen, Germany: April 16-17, 2020

In the 19th century, developments in the study and collection of coins set the cornerstone for modern numismatics: major steps included the foundation of learned societies (e.g. Royal Numismatic Society in 1836, Numismatische Gesellschaft zu Berlin in 1843, American Numismatic Society in 1858, etc.) and the publication numismatic journals from the 1830s onwards (Revue numismatique in 1836, Numismatic chronicle in 1838, Revue belge de numismatique in 1842, etc.) leading to a thriving numismatic community.

The 19th century is also the time when previously private (Royal) collections became public institutions (e.g. in Paris following the French revolution, or the Münzkabinett Winterthur in 1861), and when new museums were created (e.g. the Capitoline medagliere in 1873, Kunsthistorisches Museum Wien in 1891, etc.). Subsequently, museum curators began publishing scholarly catalogues of their collections, such as the British Museum's seminal catalogue series (e.g. Greek Coins from 1873 onwards, or Oriental Coins from 1875 onwards). Some of the works published in the 19th century were aimed at collectors, such as Théodore Mionnet's or Henry Cohen's reference works, but it is notably thanks to their publications that scholars were able to process coin finds as source for dating archaeological sites and discussing social history (e.g. Theodor Mommsen identifying Kalkriese as site for the battle of the Teutoburg Forest, as early as 1850, on the basis of numismatics).

At the same time, large and famous collections evolved, were traded, or finally bequeathed to museums leading to new research on the subject. Whilst earlier collectors were almost always generalists (coins being one collecting field among others such as antiquities, paintings, gems, etc.), collectors such as Hyman Montagu or Virgil Brand devoted themselves only to numismatics. These famous collectors were sometimes scholars themselves, writing noteworthy articles. The names of John Evans, Friedrich Imhoof-Blumer, William Henry Waddington, Archer Huntington and King Victor Emmanuel III are the most prominent examples of illustrious collectors with expertise and the desire to promote numismatic scholarship through their collections.

The 19th century is also the time when collectors started paying greater attention to the condition of a coin, and to their provenance, while the new medium of photography and improved book-illustrations allowed for the documentation and recognition of individual specimens in auction catalogues and scholarly works likewise. In the same spirit, numismatists themselves became focus of interest: medals and tokens were struck in their names, and books were written about them (e.g. Médailles et jetons des numismates in 1865).

We may also think of the institutional development of archaeology out of philology around the 1840ies to become a discipline of its own that triggered a shift in perceiving coins predominantly as material manifestations of the past. In addition, we need to take into consideration the large scale professional excavations of the century (e.g. the foundation of the Reichslimeskommission in Germany in 1892) that enabled new methods in studying coins from an academic perspective. Ultimately, this pathed the way for numismatics to become a university subject with the evolution of university coin collections. The 19th century was also a time that saw the growth of nationalism, which was accompanied by a focus on one's history as mirrored in the practice of collecting and trading coins. Questions may also include to what extend numismatics was received in the realm of contemporary art such as Eugène Delacroix's engravings, and literature - for example with the many coin references found in the work of Victor Hugo. These are some of the various new avenues and perspectives the symposium wishes to explore.

Our aim is to explore the numismatic world in the long 19th century - including both, the sphere of academia, and that of collecting and dealing - with a focus on ancient numismatics but also on medieval and modern numismatics, with an interest for the political, cultural, economic, and social changes of the era. Thus, a wide range of international experts, including numismatists, historians, archaeologists, anthropologists, and art historians are invited to present their research. Papers that explore specific case studies are particularly welcome, and talks on non-Western numismatics and on medals are hoped for.

Organizers: Stefan Krmnicek (Tübingen) & Hadrien Rambach (Brussels)

Abstracts of no longer than 500 words should be sent by email to: stefan.krmnicek@uni-tuebingen.de and coinadvisor@yahoo.co.uk.

Deadline for the submission of the abstracts is October 31, 2019.

For further information visit: https://uni-tuebingen.de/collectors-and-scholars

(CFP closed October 31, 2019)

 

 

#CFP TRA LA LUCE E LE TENEBRE. ANGELI E DEMONI NELL'HORROR, NELLA FANTASCIENZE E NEL FANTASY

I Seminario sulle “Religioni Fantastiche”

Velletri, Italy (Museo delle Religioni “Raffaele Pettazzoni”): April 16-18, 2020

Cari colleghi, in seguito al grande successo del convegno internazionale “Religioni Fantastiche e Dove Trovarle. Divinità, Miti e Riti nella Fantascienza e nel Fantasy” (Velletri, 3-6 luglio 2019), ho deciso di istituire un seminario permanente a cadenza annuale come punto di incontro di quanti in Italia studino, da un punto di vista delle discipline storiche e delle scienze sociali e antropologiche, quanto è prodotto in ogni manifestazione artistica riconducibile all’horror, alla fantascienza e al fantasy.

La prima edizione del seminario si terrà ad aprile: “Tra la Luce e le Tenebre. Angeli e Demoni nell’Horror, nella Fantascienza e nel Fantasy” (Velletri, 16-18 aprile 2020). In basso potete trovare la call for papers relativa. Vi prego di diffondere la call a quanti ritenete possano essere interessati.

Il seminario vuole essere un’occasione di confronto interdisciplinare sulla rappresentazione di angeli e demoni nella produzione horror, fantasy e di fantascienza, in ogni possibile manifestazione artistica connessa ai tre generi.

I temi che si intendono approfondire sono i seguenti:
• Definizione delle categorie “angeli” e “demoni”. Come da un punto di vista storico vengono a formarsi e definirsi queste categorie di esseri extra-umani? Quali le caratteristiche nelle singole testimonianze? Come e perché entità appartenenti ai più svariati contesti culturali sono state recepite secondo queste categorie?
• L’utilizzo delle categorie “angeli” e “demoni” nella produzione horror, fantasy e di fantascienza. Come vengono impiegate ed eventualmente rielaborate queste categorie?
• La rappresentazione nella produzione horror, fantasy e di fantascienza di angeli e demoni presenti nelle religioni “storiche”. Per quale motivo il singolo autore li rappresenta secondo una determinata chiave? Quale il rapporto con il contesto storico di appartenenza?
• La costruzione di angeli e demoni “inventati”. Quali elementi caratterizzano gli esseri inventati dai singoli autori? Secondo quali motivazioni un autore ne delinea le specifiche caratteristiche? Gli elementi che li caratterizzano vengono tratti dalle religioni “storiche” e secondo quali fini e modalità?
• La rappresentazione di miti, racconti, leggende e fiabe, “tradizionali” e “storici”, dove agiscono angeli e demoni. Secondo quali peculiarità e motivazioni questi vengono riportati nella produzione fantastica contemporanea?
• La rappresentazione di miti, racconti, leggende e fiabe, “inventati”, dove agiscono angeli e demoni. Come un singolo autore costruisce questa tipologia di narrazioni nel mondo che ha creato? Quali sono le caratteristiche che li delineano come tali? Quale il rapporto con il contesto storico-culturale di appartenenza?
• La rappresentazione dei riti riguardanti angeli e demoni presenti nelle religioni “storiche”. Secondo quali modalità e motivazioni questi vengono riportati?
• La rappresentazione di riti “inventati” riguardanti angeli e demoni. Come un singolo autore delinea questo tipo di rito nel mondo che ha creato?
• Alcune delle rappresentazioni di angeli e demoni in questi generi hanno influito concretamente sulla vita religiosa contemporanea, condizionandola?

Comitato Scientifico: Roberto Arduini (Associazione Italiana Studi Tolkieniani), Igor Baglioni (Museo delle Religioni “Raffaele Pettazzoni”), Ada Barbaro (Sapienza Università di Roma), Tommaso Braccini (Università degli Studi di Siena), Elisabetta Marino (Università degli Studi di Roma “Tor Vergata”), Francesca Roversi Monaco (Alma Mater Studiorum - Università di Bologna), Daniele Tripaldi (Alma Mater Studiorum - Università di Bologna).

Segreteria organizzativa: Igor Baglioni, direttore del Museo delle Religioni “Raffaele Pettazzoni”.

Gli studiosi interessati a presentare un contributo possono inviare un abstract di non più di una pagina (max 2.000 battute) al dott. Igor Baglioni (igorbaglioni79@gmail.com) entro e non oltre il giorno 29 febbraio 2020. All’abstract dovranno essere allegati: il titolo del paper; una breve nota biografica degli autori; un recapito di posta elettronica; un recapito telefonico. L’accettazione dei papers sarà comunicata (via posta elettronica) alle persone interessate entro il 10 marzo 2020. Entro il 10 aprile 2020 dovrà essere consegnato (sempre in via posta elettronica) il paper corredato da note e bibliografia. La consegna del paper è vincolante per la partecipazione al seminario.

Date da ricordare:
Chiusura call for papers: 29 febbraio 2020.
Notifica accettazione paper: 10 marzo 2020.
Consegna paper: 10 aprile 2020.
Seminario: 16-18 aprile 2020.

La partecipazione al seminario è gratuita. I relatori residenti fuori la provincia di Roma saranno ospitati nelle strutture convenzionate al Museo delle Religioni “Raffaele Pettazzoni”, usufruendo di una riduzione sul normale prezzo di listino. È prevista la pubblicazione degli Atti su Religio. Collana di Studi del Museo delle Religioni “Raffaele Pettazzoni” (Edizioni Quasar) e su riviste scientifiche specializzate. Le relazioni da pubblicare saranno oggetto di un peer review finale. Sono previste visite serali gratuite ai musei e ai monumenti dei comuni dei Castelli Romani. Il programma delle visite sarà reso noto contestualmente al programma del convegno.

Per informazioni: email: igorbaglioni79@gmail.com

Call for papers (pdf): https://drive.google.com/file/d/18modJeJSK0hA6B-ecd0TnAvLtdjvPRy1/view?usp=sharing

 

 

CLASSICAL ASSOCIATION CONFERENCE 2020

Swansea University, Wales: 17–20 April, 2020

The Department of Classics, Ancient History and Egyptology at Swansea University will host the 2020 Classical Association Conference, to coincide with the University’s centenary celebrations. The conference will take place on the newly founded Bay Campus (opened in 2015), which is situated in an outstanding location, has direct access on to the beach, and its own seafront promenade. Accommodation will be arranged in hotels between Swansea’s city centre and the Bay Campus.

Swansea University’s Singleton Campus is home to the Egypt Centre, Wales’ largest museum of Egyptian antiquities. Swansea is situated close to the Gower peninsula, the UK’s first designated Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. There are castles, stately homes and Roman barracks in close proximity. There will be optional excursions to allow participants to explore the area.

Proposals for 20-minute papers, especially from coordinated panels, are invited. The University is committed to supporting and promoting equality and diversity in all of its practices and activities. We aim to establish an inclusive environment and particularly welcome proposals from diverse backgrounds. The closing date for abstracts is 31 August 2019.

Suggested themes include:
Ancient Narrative Literature
Ancient Political Thought
Archaeology of Graeco-Roman Egypt
Civil War Literature
Classics and the Future
Commentaries
Fragments
Global Classics
Metals and metallurgy
Patronage
Pedagogy and Outreach
Plato
Political Failure
Regionalism
Roman Philosophy and Satire
Rulers and rulership
The ancient reception of Augustan Poetry
The literature of poverty and disgust
The Welsh Classical Tradition

Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be sent to CA2020@swansea.ac.uk by the closing date. All other enquiries should also be directed to this e-mail address.

Call: https://listserv.liv.ac.uk/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind1905&L=CLASSICISTS&P=16032

Classical Association website: https://classicalassociation.org/

(CFP closed August 31, 2019)

 

 

SUSTAINING OBJECTS AND PLACES: ENGAGING WITH CULTURAL HERITAGE IN THE 21ST CENTURY

Durham University, UK: April 20-22, 2020

The title of this conference acknowledges the dual nature of our relationship with objects and sites. We sustain them in a number of ways that include, but are not limited to, how we conceive of and think about them, how we preserve and maintain them and how we fund them, but at the same time they sustain “us” by enabling identities to be asserted and maintained and by contributing to wellbeing. The conference title also asks the question whether the models and practices (economic, intellectual and technological) that have served us in the past continue to work in the 21st century. Over the past 50 years there has been a tremendous expansion in what we identify as cultural heritage as well as the number of museums and sites dedicated to preserving and exhibiting it. Additionally, stresses, such as climate change, rising number of tourists, population growth, as well as governmental and educational priorities in many countries raise questions about whether we can truly preserve everything of significance. For many conservators and heritage professionals, public engagement and “impact” have become key metrics in assessing both the feasibility and the success of projects. But this raises questions about how sustainable these efforts are. Are we really winning the hearts and minds of the public and impacting approaches to public funding or are we providing momentary diversions? Who benefits from engagement and how much? How do we assess whether the outcomes were truly successful or merely popular?

Emerging technologies such as digital preservation, predictive modelling and crowd funding offer new tools and new challenges for both planning and preservation. In a year that has seen vast sums of money pledged for the restoration of Notre Dame in Paris, before even an assessment of the damage or needs had been completed, and has also been marked by dissension about how and when the funds should be made available to that project and how funds are allocated to other preservation projects, it is important to consider how patronage may be shaped in the years ahead and whether traditional approaches to working must be changed to accommodate them.

We invite papers that critically analyze the economics of conserving and/or preserving cultural heritage, that examine whether outreach and “impact” do produce sustainable results and how we monitor and nurture those results. We also invite papers that deal with the role that any of the following topics play in sustaining objects:
· Marketing and funding
· Sustainability
· Advocacy and Outreach
· Interpretation
· Belief and Culture
· Wellness
· Climate change

Please submit abstracts of no more than 300 words to Dr. Emily Williams emily.a.williams@durham.ac.uk by 5pm December 15th 2019. Paper selection will be completed by Jan 15th and authors notified then.

Call: https://listserv.liv.ac.uk/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind1911&L=CLASSICISTS&P=38628

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May 2020

#CFP [CHAPTERS] OUR MODERN AENEID

(Call for chapter abstracts: due May 1, 2020)

Vergil’s Aeneid is, of course, a longtime standard of the liberal arts curriculum. However, it has seen revived interest outside the academy. Since 2017, Vergil’s epic has featured in articles in the Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, and The New Yorker. All three articles argue that the Aeneid speaks as much to modernity as it does to antiquity. Mendelsohn’s New Yorker piece put it best, writing, "Aeneas [is] . . . a survivor, a person so fractured by the horrors of the past that he can hold himself together only by an unnatural effort of will, someone who has so little of his history left that the only thing that gets him through the present is a numbed sense of duty to a barely discernible future that can justify every kind of deprivation. It would be hard to think of a more modern figure. Or, indeed, a more modern story."

Nearly every review of various recent translations provides an impassioned reaffirmation of the epic’s contemporary relevance. However, scholarly practice has trailed behind scholarly rhetoric in this regard. For example, in demonstrating the modern importance of Vergil’s classic, a number of reviews from the late 2000s briefly stress the similarities between Vergil and Kipling’s views of empire. As the government sanctioned poets of global empires, one might expect to find thorough comparisons between Kipling and Vergil in the literature. Remarkably, one would find several articles devoted to historical inquiry into the quality of Kipling’s classical education, but none directly considering the relationship between those classics and his own writing.

The gap between the general claims of the Aeneid’s relevance and a rigorous working out of the details is initially startling. After all, the Aeneid hardly lacks for excellent scholarship and commentary. However, upon reflection the lacuna is unsurprising. Scholarship on the Aeneid typically comes from classicists focused on the text’s language and poetics, and its historical and cultural contexts. It is treated as an explicitly Roman cultural artifact. Since classicists are in part historians, a natural direction to expand their work on the Aeneid is to consider its reception in other historical epochs. This is precisely what we see in, e.g., Hardie’s impressive work in cataloging centuries worth of use and misuse of the epic, and Farrell and Putnam’s discussion of modern criticism of and response to the Aeneid . However, these historical methods, as important and useful as they are, won’t suffice to examine the modern significance of the text. That requires a thoroughly interdisciplinary approach.

We propose a volume of essays from a diverse group of scholars and artists that represents a multidisciplinary, multicultural redeployment of the Aeneid. We do not propose examining the Aeneid as a decidedly Roman text. Nor do we propose an examination of a cultural artifact. Rather, we seek to present a volume that deploys the Aeneid anew, one that not only reflects the Aeneid’s status as a ‘modern story’ (Mendelsohn, loc. cit.), but one that inserts the Aeneid into contemporary discourse. We understand ‘contemporary’ and ‘modern’ rather broadly—essays need not be limited strictly to the new millennium. Papers that address, for example, the Vietnam War, the Khmer Rouge, or the Rwandan genocide, would certainly be welcome.

We invite submissions that engage with the aforementioned issues or related ones regarding the Aeneid, including the following:

Artistic and cultural appropriation and reclamation, especially from a post-colonial perspective;
Using the Aeneid to explore constructions of gender;
Representations of trauma and its effects;
The Aeneid as therapy;
The Aeneid and modern commemorations;
The representation/literature/philosophy/theorizing of immigrants, immigration, refugees, cosmopolitanism, and global justice;
Race and ethnicity in the Aeneid;
Using the Aeneid to negotiate difference;
How the Aeneid complicates, or enriches modern (broadly construed) texts, art works, etc. (such as an analysis of the Aeneid and other later artworks of empire);
The Aeneid as symbol and its function as a mine for cultural signposts, etc.;
The Aeneid and pedagogy;
The Aeneid in the public and/or digital humanities.

Final papers should run between 4,000–6,000 words (inclusive of endnotes and works cited) and be formatted according to Chicago Manual of Style (17th Edition). Cite and abbreviate ancient texts according to the Oxford Classical Dictionary (3rd Edition). Revisions may be requested as a condition of acceptance. Please send all queries to the editors (Joseph R. O’Neill and Adam Rigoni) at 21stcenturyaeneid@gmail.com.

Authors are invited to submit an abstract of approximately 500 words, along with a select bibliography of at least ten sources, and an author bio of approximately 250 words to the editors at 21stcenturyaeneid@gmail.com by May 1, 2020.

Call: https://www.facebook.com/expressum/posts/1359338384246736

 

 

SYNOIKISMOS THEMATIC WORKSHOP 2020: FROM TABLETS TO SCREENS: TECHNOLOGICAL PROGRESS IN CLASSICAL AND ORIENTAL STUDIES

University of Liège, Belgium: May 5, 2020

As part of the 2019-2020 edition of the interuniversity doctoral Seminar Synoikismos, the committee is organising a thematic conference on May 5, 2020 at the University of Liège. This year, the theme will be the technological progress in the study of ancient worlds. For this occasion, we have the pleasure to invite PhD students and young researchers of Belgian or foreign universities whose research topic is related to this subject to present their project.

The topic will be addressed from two perspectives:

1. History of technological innovations and the methodological impact on our disciplines
“Exegi monumentum aere perennius”, wrote Horace. This line seems to foreshadow the long-lasting interest of humanity for the ancient world. Studies on the ancient world, which have developed over the centuries, owe their vitality to the evolution of their methods, which adapt to the spirit of each era. But to what extent has our perception of the classical period evolved with the methods and techniques used to reconstruct its image? First of all, we would like to reflect on the impact of technological progress on the study of our fields: from the invention of the printing press to digital editions, from plaster casting to 3D reconstructions, each step of this technological evolution has helped to clarify, improve or even change the representation of the past. More generally, cultural protagonists of each era have tried to interpret the traces left by ancient civilisations and to modernise them for various purposes into a message understandable by their contemporaries. The study of these cultural operations, that took place from antiquity until the present day, is the core element of Reception Studies. Therefore we also wish to consider the way each era has looked at antiquity: how did it influence the study of ancient worlds? Can research achieve ‘objectivity’? What has been done in the past and what is the trend today?

2. Digital era: the tools of tomorrow in Classical and Oriental Studies
Since the ‘50s, computing has constantly evolved and reached always more areas of human activity. Research on ancient civilisations is no exception, having always relied on new technologies for improvement. Nowadays, in 2020, there probably isn’t any research project left which isn’t based, directly or indirectly, on the use of digital tools. These are as numerous as the many fields of Classical and Oriental Studies: XML and the guidelines of the Text Encoding Initiative for encoding texts in a digital format (e.g. A collection of Greek Ritual Norms – CGRN project at ULiège), 3D modeling and visualisation softwares for digital photogrammetry of archaeological items (e.g. Warriors on the Periphery project at ULB), online databases collecting texts, people or places of the ancient world (e. g. Trismegistos project at KU Leuven) or statistical and quantitative methods for analysing languages (e.g. Laboratoire d’Analyse Statistique des Langues Anciennes – LASLA at ULiège). Yet, digital tools are still poorly known by researchers of our disciplines and might scare them to some degree, since they haven’t been trained for these skills. Which are the digital tools of tomorrow? In which areas of Classical and Oriental Studies are they used? How can we use and include them in a research project?

We would like to address these two aspects of the topic in two different ways: on the one side by discussing the impact of these tools on our research methods, on the other by exploring some of them through practical application. For this reason, there will be both oral presentations and workshops during the conference, according to the proposals we will receive.

Every PhD student who is interested (at any stage of his research) is kindly invited to submit an abstract of the subject he wishes to present (250 words max.), specifying whether he prefers to do an oral presentation and/or a practical demonstration of a tool, as well as a short biography (150 words max.) to the Synoikismos Seminar (seminar.synoikismos@gmail.com) for December 31, 2019 at the latest. Each talk (in French or in English) will last up to 30 minutes and will be followed by 15 minutes of discussion. Further information on the organisation of the workshops will be provided later on.

Call: https://www.academia.edu/40554714/Synoikismos_Seminar_-_CFP_Thematic_Conference_2020

(CFP closed December 31, 2019)

 

 

SIDONIUS APOLLINARIS BEYOND THE COMPANION: FROM ARCHAEOLOGY TO POPULAR CULTURE

Radboud University, Nijmegen (The Netherlands): May 14, 2020

Organisers: Gavin Kelly, Marc van der Poel, Daniëlle Slootjes, Joop van Waarden (Radboud University and University of Edinburgh jointly)

Due out in March 2020, the Edinburgh Companion to Sidonius Apollinaris, edited by Gavin Kelly and Joop van Waarden, assembles the latest international scholarship on Sidonius Apollinaris. This conference is set to explore the future of the study of Sidonius and his times "beyond the Companion".

Speakers will include Lucy Grig (Edinburgh) on popular culture, Caroline Michel d'Annoville (Paris) on Vaison-la-Romaine, Daniëlle Slootjes (Nijmegen) on dioceses in Gaul, and more to be invited. A distinct part of the day is a series of pitches presenting current or future work on the subject. PhD students and early career scholars are particularly (but certainly not exclusively) invited to come forward with their research (contact Joop van Waarden).

Contact: Joop van Waarden, j.vanwaarden@let.ru.nl

Check the Sidonius website https://sidonapol.org for updates on the programme and on registering for the day.

Website: https://sidonapol.org/event/companion-to-sidonius-book-launch/

 

 

L’AMORE, LE ARMI, LE STELLE: BASINIO DA PARMA AND THE HUMANISTS AT SIGISMONDO MALATESTA’S COURT

Rimini, Italy (Museo della Città, Sala del Giudizio and Palazzo Buonadrata): May 14-16, 2020

By the middle of the fifteenth century Rimini had become a major center of Italian humanism. The cultural patronage of the famous condottiere Sigismondo Pandolfo Malatesta (1417–1468), attracted numerous artists, writers, and scholars, who came to the city and created works for which Rimini is still widely known today. In spite of recently intensified research on this topic, various questions about the philosophical, literary and artistic output of this circle remain open. In particular, the historiography of Rimini itself leaves considerable room for new exploration, and this despite recent work on the architecture and pictural arts of the quattrocento city. In the philosophical and literary sphere, for example, the Aristotelian-Platonic milieu around Sigismondo has not yet received in depth study, and Valturio’s imaginative tract De Re Militari still awaits a modern edition or commentary.

One of the authors who has received attention, and whose profile underlines the importance of the Renaissance in Rimini is the poet Basinio da Parma. Basinio was a prolific author in many literary genres: His mythological poem Meleagris provides a modernised version of the Calydonian pigsticking; his didactic poem Astronomica studies the stars and the zodiac; while the Liber Isottaeus is an epistolary novel in elegiac couplets about the love between Sigismondo and Isotta degli Atti.

An ongoing project at the Ludwig Boltzmann Institute of Neo-Latin Studies in Innsbruck (Austria), funded by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF), is currently working towards a digital edition of his epic poem Hesperis, along with with a commentary and English translation. This poem was Basinio’s masterpiece and can only be understood against the wider backdrop of humanism in fifteenth century Northern Italy, and Rimini in particular. Not only do considerable historical and biographical details appear in the poem, the piece also reflects and discusses the most important cultural and literary debates of its time: philosophy, philology and education, art history and architecture etc.

The conference L’amore, le armi, le stelle intends to contextualize Basinio’s works and those of other humanists and artists within a broader framework. We invite interested speakers to propose conference papers of approx. 30 minutes with a focus on one of the following suggested (by no means exclusive) topics:

* The historiography of the Malatestian court and its interaction with contemporary cultural dynamics, more specifically with Basinio;

* The literary culture of Rimini: inter- and intratextuality in Basinio’s oeuvre, its narrative strategies and links with the vernacular tradition;

* The sculptural and pictorial arts, architecture of the Renaissance city, and manuscript illuminations within the wider context of northern Italian scriptoria;

* Philosophical trends in Rimini and northern Italy;

* Greek influences and the reflection of knowledge of this language, especially in Basinio’s Hesperis;

* Intermediality in Basinio’s Hesperis as a reflection of Rimini’s artistic and architectural culture;

* The reception of Basinio in his time and later periods;

* ...

Key note speaker: John Monfasani (University at Albany, State University of New York)

Proposals (max. 250 words) are welcome before 4th November 2019.

Languages: English, Italian

Travel and hotel costs will be covered for all speakers.

We plan to publish the papers after the conference in a peer-reviewed volume.

For any questions contact:
Anna Chisena: anna.chisena@neolatin.lbg.ac.at
Simon Smets: simon.smets@neolatin.lbg.ac.at
Florian Schaffenrath: florian.schaffenrath@neolatin.lbg.ac.at

Call: https://neolatin.lbg.ac.at/upcoming-conferences/call-papers-lamore-le-armi-le-stelle-basinio-da-parma-and-humanists-sigismondo-malatestas-court

(CFP closed November 4, 2019)

 

 

#CFP THE POPCULTURAL LIFE OF SCIENCE: STORIES OF WONDER, STORIES OF FACTS

University of Silesia in Katowice, Poland: May 20, 2020

For decades, we have been fed scientific and popcultural stories of the “we use only 10% of our brain capacity” sort. Recently, a set of new truths has been granted to us. For instance, in his 2014 popscience book Hirnrissig [Harebrained], the neurobiologist Henning Beck debunks 20 of the most widespread neuromyths, including the ubiquitous misconception that our brains work like superfast computers with limitless capacity and the idea that you can train your brain as if it were a muscle. Although these revelations of his are not new to people whose data consumption revolves around topics of trivia, anecdotes and scientific myths, others may appear indeed surprising. Bearing in mind the popularity of the theory that mirror neurons govern our behaviour, it is rather surprising to read that the scientists involved have merely put forward some preliminary observations on the basis of experiments conducted on monkey brains; and that it is far too early to create parallels and explain complex human behaviours through mirror neurons theories.

Since Beck’s revelations are in no way exclusive, they support – along with many other recent discoveries – the view that there is a larger trend or predilection we, collectively, are guilty of: we take an interesting kernel of truth, a piece of trivia encountered by accident, and we run with it, creating and spreading wild theories, without so much as checking the source. Science and popculture are particularly susceptible to these kinds of interpretation: when presented to a nonspecialist audience, a fact is filtered through relatable analogies and helpful metaphors which nonetheless simplify and dilute it. As a result, noble efforts at popularising science also open facts to abuse. As history teaches us, it takes only one unsubstantiated study to create a movement of people who distrust the scientific consensus so much that they will not vaccinate their children.

Thus, the paradox that haunts popculturally disseminated knowledge in the age of Instagram is that, to reach many, popcultural scientists often promote simplistic versions of complex phenomena and thus discourage time-consuming in-depth analyses, to the detriment of both the addressees and sciences themselves. However, as an important intellectual commodity whose influence on our everyday life is difficult to exaggerate, science disseminated in the popcultural form should not be disregarded. Not only is it an immensely popular phenomenon but, what is perhaps more important, it shapes the trajectory of how we see and how we will see the value of scientific knowledge in the future.

Having this in mind, we invite scholars of various fields to present their take on the popcultural life of science: examples, consequences and side effects of popularisation of scientific knowledge through weird tales, strange fictions and stories of wonder. Among the specific themes that might be covered in ten-minute long presentations are the following (the list is by no means exhaustive):

• popcultural representations of science and scientists
• scientification of popculture versus “popculturing” of science – mechanisms, processes, consequences and side effects
• relationships between scientific and popcultural discourses
• how to “science” in the age of Instagram – popularity, money and responsibility
• tale of science or tale of wonder?
• “get fact” – science in the service of clicks
• popcultural narratives of scientific problems – scientific facts or myths
• mythbusting – demystifying and remystifying science in popculture
• popculture as new mythology of science
• mythos, pathos and logos in the stories of science
• funification of science
• popcultural functions of science
• popculture as science/science as popculture
• popcultural contributions to science

We welcome scholars from various academic fields to submit their proposals by 20 January 2020. Abstracts (no more than 150 words) in English should be registered online at http://www.hstory.us.edu.pl/seminar/ . Notifications of acceptance will be sent out by 25 January 2020. Further deadline and editorial details on submitting texts prior to the seminar will follow.

The seminar is intended as a workshop and speakers are to submit their papers beforehand. During the seminar, each speaker briefly summarises the main points of their work, afterwards, all the participants are invited to take part in a discussion. The seminar fee is 250 PLN for participants from Poland and 60 EUR for international participants, and it includes a meal, coffee breaks and seminar materials. A selection of papers will appear in a Web of Science indexed journal and/or in a post-seminar monograph issued by a prestigious publisher.

Organizers: Justyna Jajszczok & Alicja Bemben

Find us on: http://www.hstory.us.edu.pl/seminar/ and https://www.facebook.com/Hstory-437485846310918/

Contact us at: hstory.seminar@gmail.com

 

 

FEMINISM & CLASSICS 2020: BODY/LANGUAGE

Winston-Salem, North Carolina (Wake Forest University Department of Classics and Department of Philosophy): May 21-24, 2020

FemClas 2020, the eighth quadrennial conference of its kind, takes place on May 21–24, 2020, in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, at the invitation of the Wake Forest University Department of Classics and Department of Philosophy. The conference theme is "body/language," broadly construed, and papers on all topics related to feminism, Classics, Philosophy, and related themes are welcome.

This conference focuses on the use of the body and/or language to gain, lose, contest, or express power and agency in the ancient Mediterranean world. Bodies and words, at both the physical and the conceptual levels, can exert disproportionate, oppositional, or complementary forces. Both have the power to transform their surrounding environments significantly. Yet there is a problematic dichotomy between body/physicality and language/reason, a problem long noted by philosophers, literary theorists, and social historians. FemClas 2020 seeks to contest, blur, and even eradicate these boundaries through papers, panels, and other programming that promotes interdisciplinary exploration of the ancient world.

We invite contributions that use the lens of bodies, languages, or their intersections to address any aspect of the ancient world, modern encounters with ancient cultures, or the academic practices of Classics, Philosophy, and related fields. Participants might explore how voices engender movement(s) and transform bodies, or how movement(s) in turn can stimulate recognition of unheard or otherwise suppressed voices and lead to change. These can be voices and movements within the ancient world, within the university, or within our modern disciplines. The study of agency, expressed through the problematic body/language dichotomy, addresses critical questions not only in scholarly work but also in the governance, makeup, and power dynamics of our fields, currently and historically. Now, perhaps more than ever, is a critical time for us to consider ourselves as students of bodies past and present, as embodied scholars, and to interrogate the repercussions of body normativity -- from race and gender to neurodiversity, dis/ability, and body types -- on our work and our profession.

All submissions are due September 1, 2019. FemClas 2020 welcomes individual papers, organized panels, workshops, roundtables, posters, author-meets-critic sessions, and other, innovative forms of programming. We encourage submissions from the widest possible range of perspectives, addressing all areas of the ancient world and its legacies. We also welcome proposals especially from related interest groups (such as Mountaintop, Eos Africana, the Asian and Asian American Classical Caucus, MRECC, Classics & Social Justice, the Lambda Classical Caucus, the Women's Classical Caucus, and EuGeSta) and from allied disciplines (e.g., English, comparative literature, media studies, environmental humanities, animal studies and Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies).

Proposals should aim for an abstract of approximately 300 words (not counting works cited), and should be anonymous where possible.

To submit a proposal for an individual paper or poster, visit: https://forms.gle/5hnCYHaCaMKREfrm8

To submit a proposal for any other type of session, visit: https://forms.gle/MDdu4DdqpPq82a8w5

We are enthusiastic about developing a program that will work toward making our intellectual community more welcoming and accessible to all. For this reason, we invite with special emphasis proposals for workshops, roundtables, and the like (creative formats welcome!) that will offer practical training about e.g. implicit bias, sexual harassment, racism, accessibility, developing diversity statements, and so forth.

The organizers (T. H. M. Gellar-Goad and Emily Austin) and the Program Committee of FemClas 2020 are committed to an inclusive, welcoming, and accommodating conference. Submissions from graduate students, contingent and underemployed faculty, and independent scholars are especially welcome. Submissions from undergraduate students are also welcome and will be considered separately for a dedicated panel. We will be able to provide reduced conference fees and some travel assistance for attendance by participants who cannot obtain institutional support.

As part of submission, registration, and attendance at the conference, we will ask you to agree to our conference Code of Conduct & Anti-Harassment Policy, which prohibits harassment and discrimination of any kind. A trained, experienced Anti-Harassment Administrator who is not a member of the discipline will receive and address or refer complaints about harassment and violations of the code of conduct. The Code of Conduct & Anti-Harassment Policy is available here: https://femclas2020.wordpress.com/code-of-conduct/

FemClas 2020 will take place partially on the downtown campus of Wake Forest University and partially at a nearby hotel. Each site is fully accessible for all forms of mobility. At each site there will be all-gender bathrooms, a lactation room, a quiet room, and on-site childcare (which we hope to offer at no extra cost).

Some states prohibit using state funds to travel to North Carolina, despite the partial repeal of NC HB-2. Wake Forest University, as a private institution, is not subject to NC state legislative regulations of public universities, and Wake Forest has a non-discrimination policy inclusive of sexual orientation and gender identity and expression: https://titleix.wfu.edu/nondiscrimination-statement/

Please contact T. H. M. Gellar-Goad at thmgg@wfu.edu with questions.

Website: http://femclas2020.wordpress.com

(CFP closed September 1, 2019)

 

 

MINISTERIUM SERMONIS: AN INTERNATIONAL COLLOQUIUM ON ST. AUGUSTINE’S SERMONS

KU Leuven, Belgium: 27-29 May 2020

On 27-29 May 2020, the research units History of Church and Theology and Literary Studies: Latin Literature of KU Leuven will organize, in collaboration with the C1-project Magnum opus et arduum: Towards a History of the Reception of Augustine’s De civitate Dei and the ERC-project Patristic Sermons in the Middle Ages: The Dissemination, Manipulation, and Interpretation of Late-Antique Sermons in the medieval Latin West, based at Radboud University Nijmegen, the fourth edition of Ministerium Sermonis.

This conference will bring together scholars who have recently made important contributions to the study of Augustine’s sermons. It is a sequel to the series of Ministerium Sermonis- conferences organised in Leuven-Turnhout (May 30-31, 2008), Rome (September 15-17, 2011) and Malta (April 08-10, 2015), the proceedings of which have been published in the series Instrumenta Patristica et Mediaevalia 53, 65 & 75 (Turnhout: Brepols 2009, 2012, 2017). The following survey offers some possible topics, but does not intend to exclude alternative issues or approaches:

(1) The transmission and reception of Augustine’s sermons
(2) Augustine’s argumentation (doctrine, exegesis and rhetoric)
(3) Political doctrine(s) and praxis in Latin Patristic sermons

Committed keynote speakers and respondents include: Isabelle Bochet, Johannes Brachtendorf, James Patout Burns, Gillian Clarke, Jérémy Delmulle, Max Diesenberger, François Dolbeau, Marie Pauliat, Els Rose, Clemens Weidmann.

If you would like to deliver a lecture during this conference, please send the provisional title, abstract (max. 500 words) and a concise CV (max. 500 words) before 31 May 2019, to Shari Boodts at s.boodts@let.ru.nl.

We will let you know whether your paper is included by 1 July 2019. All participants are kindly invited to announce the definitive title of their lecture and a short abstract before 31 December 2019. Lectures should be approx. 20 minutes long, followed by a general discussion of 10 minutes. The organizing committee has the intention of publishing the contributions to the conference as quickly as possible in the international series Instrumenta Patristica et Mediaevalia, published by Brepols Publishers.

The colloquium will take place in Leuven at the historical location of the Dutch College (Hollands College), where Cornelius Jansenius served as first president, and the historical Park Abbey, where Erasmus discovered Lorenzo Valla’s New Testament Notes. More practical information will follow when your abstract is accepted.

The full Call for Papers may be found here: https://shariboodts.weebly.com/news.html

(CFP closed May 31, 2019)

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June 2020

THE RECEPTION OF PLATO IN LATER ANTIQUITY AND THE MIDDLE AGES

University of Athens, Greece: June 8-9, 2020

We are delighted to announce a 2-day conference, organized by the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens in collaboration with the Australian Research Council and Macquarie University.

The conference will take place at the UNIVERSITY OF ATHENS, 8-9 JUNE 2020.

We have collaborated with the ISNS conference organisers so to facilitate the participation of local and international delegates to both events, but please note that the two events are run independently. News about our conference can be found on https://evanagno.wixsite.com/platoreception.

Our Approach: Taking start from our common interest in the Platonic tradition and its reception in later periods, our collaboration has to date yielded one edited volume (The Neoplatonists and their Heirs, Brill, 2020, ed. Ken Parry and E. Anagnostou-Laoutides), while a second one is anticipated to host select papers from the conference. We now wish to expand our network of co-thinkers and thus, we welcome papers on any aspect of Platonic reception, both in the Byzantine East and the Latin West, in philosophical, literary and/or theological texts.

Confirmed Speakers include (in alphabetical order):
-Prof Dirk Baltzly (University of Tasmania)
-Prof Kevin Corrigan (Emory University)
-Prof Lloyd Gerson (Toronto University)
-Prof Ilaria Ramelli (Durham University/ “Angelicum” University/ Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Milan)

Please, send abstracts of circa 300 words to the conference organisers by 15th DECEMBER 2019. Accepted speakers will be notified by 15th January 2020.

Our emails are: Eva Anagnostou-Laoutides (MQ) - Eva.Anagnostou-Laoutides@mq.edu.au; George Steiris (UoA) - G.Steiris@ppp.uoa.gr; George Arabatzis (UoA) - garabatz@ppp.uoa.gr.

Call: https://evanagno.wixsite.com/platoreception

(CFP closed December 15, 2019)

 

 

TEACHING CONFLICT RESOLUTION FROM ANTIQUITY TO THE PRESENT

Manaus (Universidade do Estado do Amazonas), Brazil: June 9-12, 2020

Organisers: Dr. Martin Dinter (King’s College London), Dr. Carlos Renato Rosário de Jesus, Dra. Vanúbia Moncayo, and Dra. Maristela Silva (Universidade do Estado do Amazonas)

We welcome expressions of interest for 30-minute papers to be presented at this workshop, which will take place as part of the 3rd Semana Internacional de Estudos Clássicos do Amazonas (SECLAM); for information on previous iterations of this conference, see https://sites.google.com/prod/uea.edu.br/temas-classicos.

The theme of this workshop, which follows on from two previous events in Bogotá (April 2019) and London (July 2019), is ‘The Pedagogy of Conflict Resolution’. Hence, participants might choose to present accounts of existing projects integrating the Classics and conflict resolution outreach or develop plans for future programmes combining these subjects. Participants may also wish to explore how educators can mitigate the emotional impact of potentially sensitive classroom discussions on violence and war or even approach the workshop’s theme from an ancient history perspective by exploring how the ancients addressed subjects such as warfare and peacekeeping when educating youths. We also encourage speakers to examine how conflict resolution structures found in both ancient and modern literature might be practically implemented within Brazil and Colombia. Possible case studies include a region-specific reworking of Shay’s (1994) report, which compares post-traumatic stress disorder in Vietnam War veterans to Achilles’ emotional state in the Iliad.

The key questions to be answered during this exploration are: How can we, as educators, best implement Classics-related modules on conflict resolution for students at the secondary and tertiary level? What are the lessons to be learnt from initiatives – both successful and unsuccessful, and ancient as well as modern – which center upon introducing conflict-affected populations to the Classics? How can the knowledge accumulated throughout this project be used to improve the pedagogical materials which we have designed for use in schools?

Deadline for abstracts: 15th December 2019 to martin.dinter@kcl.ac.uk.

Contact Information: Please send all expressions of interest or queries to the Principal Investigator, Dr. Martin Dinter (martin.dinter@kcl.ac.uk). Please note that all participants will require proof of yellow fever vaccination in order to travel to Manaus.

Further information relating to this workshop series can be found online at our project site: https://sites.google.com/view/conflictandclassics/home.

Confirmed Speakers
Anni Marcelli Santos de Jesus, PUC-MG/UniNorte (Brazil)
Paula da Cunha Correa, Universidade de São Paulo (Brazil)
Marcos Martinho, Universidade de São Paulo (Brazil)
Gilson Charles dos Santos, Universidade de Brasília (Brazil)
Charlene Miotti, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora (Brazil)
Leni Ribeiro Leite, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo (Brazil)
Andrea Lozano Vásquez, Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá (Colombia)
Ana Filipa Patinha Prata, Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá (Colombia)
Gemma Bernadó Ferrer, Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá (Colombia)
Ronald Forero Álvarez, Universidad de La Sabana (Colombia)
Rodrigo Verano, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (Spain)
Kathryn Tempest, University of Roehampton (UK)
Rebecca Langlands, University of Exeter (UK)
Emma Buckley, St. Andrews (UK)
David Whetham, King’ College London (UK)
Astrid Khoo, Harvard University (USA)
Sara Monoson, Northwestern University (USA)

Project Summary: The AHRC Research Networking project ‘Conflict Resolution through Classical Literature’ forms connections between academic research in Classics and War Studies and peace-building education in two Latin American target countries: Brazil and Colombia. The project is characterized by its double aim of research and outreach.

In three workshops – Bogota (April 2019), London (July 2019), and Manaus (June 2020) –participating scholars will produce new research on how Classical literature communicates and showcases conflict resolution skills, and develop ways of employing Classical literature in communicating these skills to conflict-affected youth. In so doing, they will examine ancient models of conflict resolution and map these onto the current political situation in Colombia and Brazil. In addition, they will evaluate how the Classics have historically informed pedagogical initiatives in these countries and devise ways in which ancient literature can continue to enhance peace-related education.

Call: https://sites.google.com/view/conflictandclassics/call-for-papers-workshop-3

(CFP closed December 15, 2019)

 

 

ISRAEL SOCIETY FOR THE PROMOTION OF CLASSICAL STUDIES - 49TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE

Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel: June 10-11, 2020

The Israel Society for the Promotion of Classical Studies is pleased to announce its 49th annual conference to be held at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev on Wed-Thurs, 10-11 JUNE 2020. Our keynote speaker in 2020 will be Professor Sheila Murnaghan, Alfred Reginald Allen Memorial Professor of Greek, University of Pennsylvania.

The conference is the annual meeting of the society. Papers are welcome on a wide range of classical subjects, including but not limited to history, philology, philosophy, literature, reception, papyrology, and archaeology of Greece and Rome,and neighboring lands. The time limit for each lecture is 20 minutes. The official languages of the conference are English and Hebrew.

Conference fee is $50. Accommodation at reduced prices will be available at local hotels. Registration forms with a list of prices will be sent to participants in due course.

All proposals should consist of a one page abstract (about 250-300 words). Proposals in Hebrew should also be accompanied by a one-page abstract in English to appear in the conference brochure.

Proposals, abstracts and other correspondence should be sent to Dr. Lisa Maurice, Secretary of the ISPCS, at lisa.maurice@biu.ac.il

All proposals should reach the secretary by 19th DECEMBER, 2019.

Decisions will be made after the organizing committee has duly considered all the proposals. If a decision is required prior to early February, please indicate this in your letter and we will try to accommodate your needs.

Call: https://listserv.liv.ac.uk/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind1907&L=CLASSICISTS&P=2484

 

 

TEACHING CLASSICS IN THE DIGITAL AGE

Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel (Germany): June 15-16, 2020

Currently, the various fields of Classics are facing the question of how digital media can contribute to teaching and communicating content and methods concerning the research of ancient societies at universities as well as to a broader public. The congress Teaching Classics in the Digital Age aims at presenting a status-quo of digital approaches in teaching and at sharing best-practice examples by bringing together different projects and practitioners from Classical Archaeology, Greek and Latin Studies and Ancient History. Furthermore, it aims at starting a discussion about principles, problems and the future of teaching Classics in the 21st century within and beyond its single fields.

We consider the following as key questions:
- How can digital methods and research approaches be implemented in teaching at university level?
- Which technical possibilities are suitable for digital teaching and how can they be used successfully?
- What are the limitations of and obstacles for applying digital teaching methods in Classics?
- How can digital methods help us to reach out to teachers and students at primary and secondary schools as well as to the broader public?
- How can digital methods contribute to the dissemination of Classics as part of a lifelong education?

The congress will comprise paper presentations and a session with posters and hands-on project presentations. At present, we are still welcoming proposals in the fields of Ancient History and Classical Archaeology and are particularly interested in collaborations between classicists and specialists in Digital Learning.

The congress Teaching Classics in the Digital Age will be organised as part of the Strategic Partnership “Ancient Cities” (ERASMUS+). The partnership is considering options to refund travel and accommodation costs for the participants. There will be no conference fee. The contributions will be published as part of an open-access conference proceedings.

Proposals for papers in English of 20 minutes and for posters/project presentations together with a short abstract of no more than 2000 characters and a short CV are welcomed by January 5th 2020.

Please submit by email to feuser@klassarch.uni-kiel.de.

Website: https://www.klassarch.uni-kiel.de/de/ancient-cities-creating-a-digital-learning-environment-on-cultural-heritage-2017-1-de01-ka203-003537/teaching-classics-in-the-digital-age

(CFP closed January 5, 2020)

 

 

#CFP INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE IN CLASSICS AND ANCIENT HISTORY

Coimbra, Portugal: June 22-25, 2020

The Centre for Classical and Humanistic Studies of the University of Coimbra announces the first edition of its biennial Conference in Classics and Ancient History (22nd – 25th June 2020, at the University of Coimbra.

We welcome proposals from scholars of any country for single-discipline or interdisciplinary panels in such research areas as Greek and Roman literature, ancient history, archaeology, philosophy, art, religious studies, linguistics concerning any period of Antiquity or its reception up to the present day.

The Organizing and Scientific Committees of the conference include scholars from different countries; the Conference aims to be a forum for experts from all over the world.

Each panel must be proposed by at least two organizers. They are responsible for submitting the panel topic for evaluation by the Organizing Committee and, after approval, for elaborating and promoting the Call for Papers for their panel. We recommend 10 as minimum number and 15 as maximum number of speakers per panel.

Accepted languages: it is up to the panel organizers, when recruiting their panel members, to indicate their range of language(s) for academic discourse. All panels should in principle consider submissions in English or Portuguese. The organization of the event will use English as its official language, for the sake of wide international accessibility.

Deadlines:
- 15th January 2020 (panel submissions)
- 25th January 2020 (communication of accepted proposals)
- 31st March 2020 (communication to the Organizing Committee of the final program of each panel)

Detailed information on the Conference is available on the website.

In particular, we would like to draw your attention to the need to consult the information relating to:
- Call for Panels https://cechfluc.wixsite.com/ccah/call-for-panels
- Instructions for Panel Organizers https://cechfluc.wixsite.com/ccah/instructions-for-panel-organizers
- Registration https://cechfluc.wixsite.com/ccah/registration

E-mail address for submitting proposals: cech.carmensoares@gmail.com

 

 

SYMPOSIUM CUMANUM 2020: GENERIC INTERPLAY IN AND AFTER VERGIL

Villa Vergiliana, Cuma, Italy: June 24–26, 2020

Co-directors: Brittney Szempruch (United States Air Force Academy) and John F. Miller (University of Virginia)

Although Vergil famously opens the Aeneid with a definitive statement of poetic intent—arma virumque cano—scholarship has long highlighted the poet’s propensity for the complication of firm generic boundaries. Amid a range of theoretical responses that have shaped the past nearly one hundred years (Kroll 1924; Cairns 1972; Fowler 1982; Conte 1986; Harrison 2007), the Vergilian corpus has emerged as some of the most productive ground for the in-depth study of generic flexibility (e.g. Nelis 2004; Seider 2016).

On its broadest level, this symposium aims to bring together scholars to discuss how the works of Vergil illuminate questions about genre and literary identity in the ancient world. In addition to looking at generic interplay in Vergil’s poetry, we seek to examine the role that genre has played in Vergil’s afterlife, both among his contemporaries and in later ages: how, particularly in relation to Vergil’s poems, did genre create or elide perceived boundaries and/or affiliations between authors in antiquity? What cultural implications did explicit or implicit generic interplay have? How has genre shaped not only our understanding of Vergil and what it meant to be an Augustan poet, but our reception (‘after’ in another sense) of the earlier genres with which he engaged? What do we gain and lose by putting Vergil at the forefront of this narrative?

Both textual studies and theoretical interventions are welcome. Papers might consider (but are not limited to) the following topics:

• ‘Greek’ vs. ‘Roman’ genres across Vergil’s poetry
• Vergil’s reception of Hellenistic generic theory and experimentation
• the presence of nonpoetic genres (scientific, philosophical, etc.) in the Vergilian corpus
• hymn, epigram, and tragedy in Vergil
• elegy and Vergilian pastoral
• ‘didactic’ and heroic epic
• the reception of Vergilian generic conventions
• the centrality of (and/or bias toward) Vergil in discussions of genre in antiquity

Speakers will include Giancarlo Abbamonte (Naples–Federico II), Alessandro Barchiesi (NYU), Sergio Casali (Rome–Tor Vergata), Stephen Harrison (Oxford), Julia Hejduk (Baylor), Alison Keith (Toronto), Giuseppe La Bua (Rome–Sapienza), James O’Hara (UNC Chapel Hill), Vassiliki Panoussi (William & Mary), Stefano Rebeggiani (USC), Fabio Stok (Rome–Tor Vergata), and Adriana Vazquez (UCLA).

Papers will be 20 minutes long with ample time for discussion. Participants will arrive on June 23 followed by three full days of papers, discussion, and visits to Vergilian sites.

Interested scholars should send an abstract of no more than 300 words to vergilandgenre2020@gmail.com by December 1, 2019.

For inquiries and further information, contact the directors: Brittney Szempruch (brittney.szempruch@usafa.edu); John Miller (jfm4j@virginia.edu)

Cited Works
Cairns, F. 1972. Generic Composition in Greek and Roman Poetry. Edinburgh.
Conte, G. B. 1986. The Rhetoric of Imitation: Genre and Poetic Memory in Virgil and Other Latin Poets. Cornell.
Fowler, A. 1982. Kinds of Literature: An Introduction to the Theory of Genres and Modes. Harvard.
Nelis, D. 2004. “From Didactic to Epic: Georgics 2.458–3.48.” In Latin Epic and Didactic Poetry: Genre, Tradition and Individuality, ed. M. Gale. Swansea: 73-107.
Harrison, S. J. 2007. Generic Enrichment in Vergil and Horace. Oxford.
Kroll, W. 1924. “Die Kreuzung der Gattungen.” Studien zum Verständnis der römischen Literatur: 202–24.
Seider, A. M. 2016. “Genre, Gallus, and Goats: Expanding the Limits of Pastoral in Eclogues 6 and 10.” Vergilius 62: 3–23.

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/scs-news/cfp-generic-interplay-and-after-vergil

(CFP closed December 1, 2019)

 

 

#CFP TOWARDS A MORE INCLUSIVE CLASSICS: PERSPECTIVES FROM TEACHING AND RESEARCH

Institute of Classical Studies, Senate House, London, UK: June 25, 2020

Classicists have recently been engaged in discussions about decolonising the discipline. There are a few ways to understand this process; it includes (1) broadening the range of materials we study to include those produced by marginalised groups in antiquity (2) approaching material with methodologies which tease out marginalised groups depicted in the materials and give voice to a range of users in antiquity and beyond (3) acknowledging the part that Classics has played in entrenching many forms of inequality, such as those focussed on ethnicity, in British and other societies (4) undertaking efforts to ensure that the discipline is open to a plurality of voices both from the past and in the present, especially those which have historically been marginalised.

This timely workshop aims to explore ways of making Classics more inclusive and to reframe the discipline for a multicultural 21st century. To this end, we seek short contributions from:

* lecturers who have specifically endeavoured to develop research that works with a broader conception of Classics, and/or to make their teaching more inclusive

* students who invest in different versions of the classical heritage, and/or are willing to share their diverse experiences of being in the 'Classics classroom'.

We plan to host several 15-minute contributions on these topics. Please send abstracts (c.150 words) to Professor Barbara Goff (b.e.goff@reading.ac.uk) and Dr Alexia Petsalis-Diomidis (aipd@st-andrews.ac.uk) by 1 March 2020.

To further the goal of broadening participation, we welcome offers of talks via Skype; and in this vein we will live-stream the workshop. One of the aims of the workshop is to produce a short list of useful suggestions for those who want to make their teaching more inclusive.

Call: https://listserv.liv.ac.uk/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind1912&L=CLASSICISTS&P=86353

 

 

WRITING ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL SAME-SEX DESIRE: GOALS, METHODS, CHALLENGES

Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand: June 30-July 2, 2020

For several decades now, scholars have devoted attention to same-sex desire in both ancient times and the centuries that followed. Not surprisingly, there have been vigorous debates over how to go about it. These debates have been framed in various ways. Here are some examples:

* essentialism VERSUS constructivism;
* Foucauldian discourse analysis VERSUS approaches inspired by psychoanalysis;
* (the impossibility of) objective history VERSUS (overly) subjective history;
* perception of commonalities across time VERSUS rigorously historicizing insistence on the past's alterity;
* positivism VERSUS imaginative reconstruction of contemporaneous receptions.

These dichotomies, which are both reductive and don't exhaust the possibilities, continue to crackle with contention. They also continue to undergird and even disturb current scholarly endeavours.

We are looking for papers (30 minutes in length) in which scholars not only speak about primary source material but also reflect explicitly on the theoretical orientation of their work (see the dichotomies above for examples) and the purpose(s) of (their) scholarship on same-sex desire. An additional objective of this conference will be an edited volume of papers that will aim to showcase a variety of approaches to this important topic.

Please send proposals (c. 500 words) to Mark Masterson writingsamesexdesire@gmail.com by 1 December 2019. If you have any questions, please send them to him at this address also.

In your proposal include:
1) the primary source material/historical milieu to be discussed, and
2) the general theoretical basis of the work

Call: https://cms.victoria.ac.nz/slc/about/events/writing-ancient-and-medieval-same-sex-desire-goals,-methods,-challenges/call-for-papers

(CFP closed December 1, 2019)

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July 2020

#CFP PACIFIC RIM ROMAN LITERATURE SEMINAR 34: IMAGES OF EARLY ROME

Boston University, Massachusetts, USA: July 10-12, 2020

The thirty-fourth meeting of the PacRim Roman Literature Seminar will be held at Boston University from 10 to 12 July 2020. The theme for the 2020 conference will be “Images of Early Rome in Latin Literature.”

Papers are invited to explore different depictions of the figures of early Rome in Latin literature; Aeneas, Ilia, Romulus and Remus, the Sabine Women, Lucretia, etc. How do the iterations of these figures reflect (or problematize) political and literary attitudes in Rome? And what does the continued presence of these early figures in the works of successive literary generations tell us about the enduring nature of these Roman “myths”? We also invite papers on the reception of early Rome in any medium, from Shakespeare’s The Rape of Lucrece (1594), to Ursula K. Le Guin’s Lavinia (2008), to Matteo Rovere’s Il Primo Re (2019).

Papers should be 30 minutes in length (with fifteen minutes of discussion time). The Pacific Rim Seminar does not run parallel sessions; participants can attend any or all papers. Abstract proposals of 200-300 words, and queries about the conference, should be sent to the organizer, Hannah Čulík-Baird, at culik@bu.edu. Submissions from graduate students and early-career researchers are welcome. Please have abstracts submitted by 15th January 2020 (earlier submissions welcome).

Call: https://pacrim34.wordpress.com

 

 

[PANELS] CELTIC CONFERENCE IN CLASSICS 2020

Note: call for individual papers has not yet opened.

Lyon, France (Universities of Lyon/École normale supérieure de Lyon): July 15-18, 2020

The Celtic Conference in Classics (CCC) is pleased to announce that its 13th conference, hosted by the universities of Lyon and by the École normale supérieure de Lyon, will take place in Lyon, France, 15-18 July (Wed.-Sat.), 2020.

As always, participation is invited from all countries of the world. Suggestions are now invited from colleagues wishing to convene a panel for the event at Lyon. The languages of the conference are English and French.

Panels typically consist of between 12 and 18 speakers. Themes and speakers proposed are then discussed, and a selection made, by the Conference's organisers. For this iteration of the CCC, we shall be looking especially for panels which expect to include speakers from French-speaking campuses. Proposals should be sent to all five organisers (at the email addresses below) by 1 December.

(Lyon)
Nicolas Richer (nicolas.richer@ens-lyon.fr)
Claire Fauchon Claudon (claire.fauchon@ens-lyon.fr)

(CCC)
Anton Powell (powellanton@btopenworld.com)
Douglas Cairns (douglas.cairns@ed.ac.uk)
Nancy Bouidghaghen (nancy.bouidghaghen@googlemail.com)

General details about the CCC, its history, purposes, and ethos, can be found on our permanent website: http://www.celticconferenceinclassics.org/.

(CFP [panels] closed December 1, 2019)

 

 

#CFP THE MARY RENAULT PRIZE

Applications close: July annually.

The deadline for the 2020 Mary Renault Prize competition is: TBA.

The Mary Renault Prize is a Classical Reception essay prize for school or college sixth form pupils, awarded by the Principal and Fellows of St Hugh’s College, and funded by the royalties from Mary Renault’s novels.

The Principal and Fellows of St Hugh’s College offer two or more Prizes, worth up to £300 each, for essays on classical reception or influence submitted by pupils who, at the closing date, have been in the Sixth Form of any school or college for a period of not more than two years. The prizes are in memory of the author Mary Renault, who is best known for her historical novels set in ancient Greece, recently reissued by Virago. Renault read English at St Hugh’s in the 1920s and subsequently taught herself ancient Greek. Her novels have inspired many thousands of readers to pursue the study of Classics at University level and beyond. At least one prize will be awarded a pupil who is not studying either Latin or Greek to A-level standard. The winning essay will be published on the College’s website. Teachers wishing to encourage their students to enter the competition can download, display and circulate the competition poster in the ‘related documents’ section.

Essays can be from any discipline and should be on a topic relating to the reception of classical antiquity – including Greek and Roman literature, history, political thought, philosophy, and material remains – in any period to the present; essays on reception within classical antiquity (for instance, receptions of literary or artistic works or of mythical or historical figures) are permitted. Your submission must be accompanied by a completed information cover sheet. Essays should be between two-thousand and four-thousand words and submitted by the candidate as a Microsoft Word document through the form below.

Website: https://www.st-hughs.ox.ac.uk/prospectivestudents/outreach/mary-renault-prize/

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August 2020

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September 2020

SAPIENS UBIQUE CIVIS VIII - SZEGED 2020

PhD Student and Young Scholar Conference on Classics and the Reception of Antiquity

Szeged, Hungary: September 2–4, 2020

The Department of Classical Philology and Neo-Latin Studies, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Szeged, Hungary is pleased to announce its International Conference Sapiens Ubique Civis VIII – Szeged 2020, for PhD Students, Young Scholars, as well as M.A. students aspiring to apply to a PhD program.

The aim of the conference is to bring together an international group of young scholars working in a variety of periods, places, languages, and fields. Papers on a wide range of subjects, including but not limited to the literature, history, philology, philosophy, linguistics and archaeology of Greece and Rome, Byzantinology, Neo-Latin studies, and reception of the classics, as well as papers dealing with theatre studies, comparative literature, contemporary literature, and fine arts related to the Antiquity are welcome.

Lectures: The language of the conference is English. Thematic sessions and plenary lectures will be scheduled. The time limit for each lecture is 20 minutes, followed by discussion. It is not possible to present via Skype.

Abstracts: Abstracts of maximum 300 words should be sent by email as a Word attachment to sapiensuc@gmail.com strictly before June 12, 2020. The abstracts should be proofread by a native speaker. The document should also contain personal information of the author, including name, affiliation and contact email address, and the title of the presentation. Acceptance notification will be sent to you until June 21, 2020.

Registration: The registration fee for the conference is €70, however for those who apply before May 10, 2020, we provide a €20 discount. The participation fee includes conference pack, reception meal, closing event, extra programs, and refreshments during coffee breaks. The participation fee does not include accommodation, but the conference coordinators will assist the conference participants in finding accommodation in the city centre. Those who intend to bring a guest are obligated to pay €30 in addition to the registration fee.

Publication: All papers will be considered for publication in a peer-reviewed journal on Classics.

Getting here: Szeged, the largest city of Southern Hungary, can be easily reached by rail from Budapest and the Budapest Ferenc Liszt International Airport. Those who prefer travelling by car can choose the European route E75, and then should take the Hungarian M5 motorway, a section of E75, passing by the city.

Chairman of the Conference Committee
Dr János Nagyillés PhD (Head of Department)

Members of the Conference Committee
Dr habil. Ibolya Tar CSc; Prof László Szörényi DSc; Dr György Fogarasi PhD
Dr Gergő Gellérfi PhD; Dr Endre Ádám Hamvas PhD; Dr Imre Áron Illés PhD;
Dr Tamás Jászay PhD; Dr habil. Péter Kasza PhD; Dr Ferenc Krisztián Szabó PhD

Conference coordinators
Fanni Csapó
Bianka Csapó
Attila Hajdú
Dr Tamás Jászay PhD
Dr Gergő Gellérfi PhD (for general inquiries about the conference: gellerfigergo@gmail.com)

Call: https://listserv.liv.ac.uk/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind2001&L=CLASSICISTS&P=43478

 

 

WOMEN DISRUPTING THE PATRIARCHY (ICS WOMEN IN ANTIQUITY CONFERENCE SERIES)

Institute of Classical Studies, London: September 18-19, 2020

The study of women in the ancient world has garnered academic interest and public fascination since the feminist movement of the 60s and 70s. Seminal works by Sarah B. Pomeroy, Suzanne Dixon, Judith P. Hallett and Susan Treggiari, to name just a few, have highlighted the abundance of resources in the ancient world that can be used to shed light on the various roles that women played in these societies. This inaugural Women in Antiquity Conference Series, hosted by the Institute of Classical Studies in London, would like to continue this current trend by focussing on ‘Female agency: Women disrupting the patriarchy’.

The conference’s aim is to bring forward all the emerging research on female agency in antiquity. The term antiquity has been used, instead of more ‘traditional’ terms such as ancient history and classics, so as to include all time periods, as well as geographical regions, of the ancient world. As such, topics that span from prehistory to late medieval times will be considered. Moreover, topics on any aspect of ‘Female agency: Women disrupting the patriarchy’ will also be considered. These may include, but are not limited to, one of the following:

• Female leaders in a predominately patriarchal society
• Women in the judicial arena
• Women as head of the house or head of their family units
• Female doctors, midwives and scientists
• Women in commerce
• Female authors
• Women in religious roles
• Female athletes, musicians and actors
• Women as benefactors and patrons

Any aspect of female agency, whether it be archaeological, epigraphical, literary, visual, prosopographical, or interdisciplinary, will be considered.

Abstracts of no more than 350 words are sought by all levels of academic researchers, as well as PhD students. Papers presented will be 30 minutes, followed by 5-10 minutes of questions. Three paper panels, with a common focus adhering to the conference theme, are also encouraged.

Please submit abstracts by no later than February 28, 2020 to womeninantiquity@gmail.com

Please get current information on Twitter (@AntiquityWomen) and Facebook (@WomeninAntiquityconference).

Website: https://womeninantiquity.wixsite.com/conference

 

 

ANCIENT FABLES: SOUR GRAPES? - NEW APPROACHES

University of Graz, Austria: September 24-26, 2020

Organizers: Prof. Dr. Ursula Gärtner (Graz), Lukas Spielhofer (Graz)

Confirmed speakers: Gert-Jan van Dijk (Leiden), Andreas Fritsch (Berlin), Ursula Gärtner (Graz), Jeremy Lefkowitz (Swarthmore), Silvia Mattiacci (Siena), Caterina Mordeglia (Trento), Johannes Park (Göttingen), Chiara Renda (Naples), Hedwig Schmalzgruber (Potsdam), Lukas Spielhofer (Graz), Giovanni Zago (Florence)

The genre of ancient fable has long been neglected by scholars, with 20th-century research still focusing primarily on questions of textual transmission, the evolution of literary motifs, or reception history. The idea that fables were intended as a means of voicing their discontent by lower social classes has inclined many researchers to place emphasis on their sociocultural value. Over the last decades, however, there has also been a growing scholarly interest in the respective authors and their works. Some of these contributions adhere to the traditional biographical-interpretive approach, while others stress poetological aspects and demonstrate how the fables, in a unique and witty way, fit themselves into the literary discourse of their time.

It is the aim of this conference to bring together scholars who have, over the last years, opened up new approaches in this field, and to create an international network of ancient-fable scholarship.

Key questions:

1. Text and transmission
Research on ancient fable is often hampered by poor textual transmission. What is the latest state of research concerning new findings and new readings, both in individual cases and generally? In the case of many ancient fables, the circumstances of their historical transmission are still unclear. How have the extant ancient fable collections come down to us, what developments have they undergone in the process, and in what way does this depend upon the form of the collection (intentional/arbitrary/accidental)?
2. Contextualisation
The function of fables per se is the exemplification of statements in a given context. When they are collected and achieve the status of a literary genre in its own right, they lose their original explanatory function. What divergent but plausible contextualisations (pragmatic, sociological, literary, concerning intellectual and motif history, in the context of animal studies, etc.) and corresponding interpretations can be found?
3. Audience
What can we deduce from content and structure about the intended audience of the fables? How is the implied reader characterised and what does this tell us about possible contextualisations?
4. Poet, poeta, persona
Hardly anything is known today about the empirical, flesh-and-blood authors of ancient fables. How and when did their authorial representations emerge? Does the ‘Dichterinstanz’, the authorial character, express himself in the fables, and if so, how does this self-representation work? What is the relevance of poetological considerations?
5. Fables in the literary discourse of their time
Do subtexts and parallels allow us to attribute fables to a certain literary tradition? How do other ancient texts reflect on fables? Can we draw parallels between ancient fable and other literary genres and/or currents?
6. Reception
By whom and how were fables taken up in late antiquity, the Middle Ages and the modern period? What continuities and transformations can be observed?

There will be a time slot of 30 minutes for each paper (English or German), followed by a discussion. Selected articles may be published as a special volume.

All submissions must be written either in English or German and must include: An abstract with a short bibliography (each abstract should be no more than 250 words, bibliography excluded). A brief academic biography, which should mention the author’s name, surname, academic email, current affiliation and selected bibliography.

The deadline for submitting proposals is January 30, 2020. Acceptance of contributions will be notified by February 15, 2020.

In the meantime, if you have any questions regarding any aspect of the conference, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Contact: Prof. Dr. Ursula Gärtner, Institute of Classics, University of Graz. Email: ursula.gaertner@uni-graz.at

Call: https://www.facebook.com/expressum/posts/1393010570879517

 

 

THE MULTIPLE ANTIQUITIES OF GREEK MODERNITY (19TH-21ST CENTURIES)

National Hellenic Research Foundation, Athens, Greece: September 24–26, 2020

“Wishing to restore to life a nation that has disappeared from history as a political entity on account of its former glory is as reasonable as wishing to resuscitate animal species that have ceased to exist long ago and whose traces are buried in the Paleozoic layers of the earth (…) and yet it is this kind of absurd thinking that has taken hold of those of us who seek to found our national existence not on the development of existing elements but on memories of classical antiquity – which, by the way, modern Greeks have a very poor knowledge of, acquired via a second-rate translation by A.R. Rangavis of the Compendium of Goldsmith’s History of Greece.” - Ἀσμοδαῖος, 22/2/1881

National origins were at the centre of discussions across Europe in the nineteenth century. Could it have been possible, then, for the Greeks not to take advantage of a source of legitimacy as flattering and as promising as antiquity? In fact, ancient Greece turned right away into a decisive factor in the arduous process of shaping Modern Greek identity and state ideology. The mode of connection established in this manner between the Modern Greek state and the ancient Greek past has nevertheless proved to be an incessant source of genuine difficulties as illustrated by this (self-) critical description of the Modern Greek obsession with antiquity which was published anonymously in 1881 in the satirical journal of Themos Anninos, Asmodaios.

The attempted large-scale resuscitation of an irrevocably bygone age ended up being a crushing weight upon the present of a society in which the recollection of antiquity had to be actively cultivated. The gap that emerged between the spoken (δημοτική) and the purist (καθαρεύουσα) language highlights the grip that a monumental past had on a present that was destined to become archaizing. At the same time, a return to antiquity of such scope depended upon the successful introduction and adaptation of the classical tradition of Western Europe and its academic know-how.

We aim to examine the Modern Greek turn to the Ancient Greek past, giving particular attention to:

* The diversity and multiplicity of the “Antiquities” created and disseminated in the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries
* The contexts – national, cultural, political – in which diverse and often conflicting conceptions of antiquity were formulated and interacted with each other
* The ways in which the dominant version of national history was sustained or undermined by co-existing versions with alternative claims to antiquity.

To investigate these questions, we encourage the adoption of interdisciplinary perspectives fostering dialogue between intellectual history, cultural and classical reception studies and literary theory.

The following list of suggested topics is indicative (and not exhaustive):

* Articulating the couple Ancients / Moderns: historiography and temporalities, representations, imaginary
* A mediated relationship: from modern to ancient Greece via Western Europe. Introducing western European classical learning: translations and the policies of reception; The journey to Greece (itineraries, pilgrimages, travel guides);The mediation and cultural policies of foreign archaeological schools.
* Modern Greek institutions and the development of an ‘autochthonous’ classical scholarship: The Archaeological Society, the University of Athens, museums etc; National historiography and folklore studies.
* Antiquity in the light of the dominant political ideologies of the 19th and 20th century
* Antiquity and the Greek-Orthodox Church
* Antiquity beyond ancient Greece: Modern Greek perceptions of non-Greek ancient cultures (Roman, Jewish, Egyptian, Persian, et al)
* Antiquity in excess: Criticism and satires of the modern Greek obsession with antiquity; the discussion about kitsch
* Revivalisms: The modern Greek “parlêtre” or the insoluble language question; Material culture and Antiquity: Naming practices (first names, street names, names of plans of political repression or natural disaster prevention etc); Buildings (public and private); Symbols (coins, medals, stamps etc); Tattoos; Souvenirs; Associations: Sports clubs, cultural societies, neo-pagan groups etc.; Videogames, comics, board games.
* Antiquity and sexual identities: The LGBT communities; homo-nationalism etc.
* The Antiquity of the Modern Greek Diaspora: journals, associations, schools, restaurants etc.

The conference will take place at the National Hellenic Research Foundation on 24-26 September 2020. Proposals should be submitted in either French or English.

Abstract deadline: January 10, 2020

Call: [Academia] https://www.academia.edu/40627159/The_Multiple_Antiquities_of_Greek_Modernity_19_th_-21_st_centuries via http://maryjahariscenter.org/blog/the-multiple-antiquities-of-greek-modernity

(CFP closed January 10, 2020)

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October 2020

#CFP GLOBAL CLASSICS AND AFRICA: PAST, PRESENT, AND FUTURE

Classical Association of Ghana: Second International Classics Conference in Ghana (ICCG)

University of Ghana, Legon, Ghana: October 8-11, 2020

The late 1950s and early 1960s ushered in a period when many African countries were gaining political independence. Immediately, there was an agenda to unite African nations, and a policy of Africanization began to gain ground. In the area of education, this Africanization process was vigorously pursued. In Ghana the Institute of African Studies was established, and an Encyclopaedia Africana project, originally conceived by W. E. B. DuBois, was revived. In Nigeria, new universities were established to counter the colonial-based education that was present at the University of Ibadan, and in some East African countries there were fears that foreign university teachers would not be able to further the Africanization of university education.

One of the fields of study singled out in this process of Africanization was Classics. Classics was believed to serve the interests of colonialism and neo-colonialism. Part of the agenda of this Africanization was to highlight African contributions to world civilization and to show that the ‘Western’ world could not lay claim to any superior heritage. As part of restitutive measures in the field, scholars have begun exploring the idea of ‘Global Classics’, showing how the Classics connects with the broad spectrum of humanity and society. While there is evidence to show that this kind of link has been explored since (or even before) the independence of African nations, it has begun to garner attention across the world. Yet, there are still places in Africa and other continents where Classics continues to be inward-looking and does not open itself to interdisciplinarity, collaborations, nor to other civilizations besides the Graeco-Roman world.

In the present context of globalization, and the decolonization and Africanization of education in Africa, how might we account for the role of Classics in Africa, and to what extent can the idea of ‘Global Classics’ be the way forward? We seek papers that explore these questions, from the earliest presence of Classical scholarship (broadly defined, and including archaeology, literature, material culture, anthropology, history, philosophy, linguistics, etc.) in Africa, and project what the future holds for Classics in Africa. We also welcome papers that draw lessons from non-African contexts. Papers may explore any of the following, as well as related, themes:

* academic freedom and politics
* African studies and global history
* Africanists/African-Americanists and the Classics
* art, museums, and architecture
* citizenship, migration, and cosmopolitanism
* classical connections with cognate and non-Classics disciplines
* comparative cultural reflections
* decolonization, pedagogy, and curriculum development
* economy, trade, and diplomacy
* gender and sexuality
* geography, environment, and development
* globalization, capitalism, and education
* race, ethnicity, and identity
* science, technology, and society
* war, peace, and democracy

Please submit abstracts of no more than 300 words for 20-minute papers to iccg@ug.edu.gh by December 15, 2019 EXTENDED DEADLINE Jan 30, 2020. Details of registration, travel, and accommodation will be communicated later. For enquiries, please email Gifty Katahena (kemgift@gmail.com) or Michael Okyere Asante (kwadwoasante1@gmail.com).

Organizing Committee:
Gifty Etornam Katahena, University of Ghana, Legon, Ghana
Peter K. T. Grant, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast, Ghana
Michael K. Okyere Asante, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch, South Africa
Daniel Orrells, King’s College, London, United Kingdom

A report on our collaboration with Eos at our first conference can be read at this link: https://www.eosafricana.org/collaborations/ghana-international-classics-conference-2019.

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/scs-news/cfp-global-classics-and-africa

 

 

#CFP HOMER AS CULTURAL HORIZON

University of Nice, France: October 21-24, 2020

University Côte d’Azur and the Center for Hellenic Studies are pleased to announce the following Conference to be held at the University of Nice on 21-24 October 2020

Organized jointly by Nicolas Bertrand (Université Côte d’Azur), Gregory Nagy (Harvard University, Center for Hellenic Studies), Giampiero Scafoglio (Université Côte d’Azur), Arnaud Zucker (Université Côte d’Azur).

The general purpose of the conference is to provide an up-to-date panorama of today’s Homeric research, through six thematic panels. We welcome diverse and even polemic proposals in order to achieve a dynamic and constrasted discussion on Homer’s legacy and actuality.

Confirmed speakers are : Rutger ALLAN (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, NL), Eugenio AMATO (Université de Nantes, FR), Nicolas BOUVIER (Université de Lausanne, CH), Jonathan BURGESS (University of Toronto, CA), Casey DUÉ HACKNEY (University of Houston, TX, USA), Richard HUNTER (Cambridge University, GB) Gregory NAGY (Harvard University / CHS, Washington DC,USA), Filippomaria PONTANI (Università Ca' Foscari, Venezia, IT).

You are warmly invited to send a proposal. All proposals should consist of a one page abstract (about 250-300 words), for 30-minute papers to be delivered preferably in English or French, but papers in German and Italian are also accepted. Paper submissions should fit into one of the panels that must be clearly indicated by the author. The abstract should omit any reference identifying the author to ensure anonymity in the review process. The deadline for abstracts is February 1st. Participants will be notified of the acceptance of their proposals by March 1st 2020. Accommodation and meals will be provided for all speakers but the organization committee will not cover travel expenses.

Proposals, abstracts and other correspondence should be sent to: homer2020@univ-cotedazur.fr

Website: https://www.cepam.cnrs.fr/evenement/colloque-h2020-homer-as-cultural-horizon/

 

 

#CFP VI INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON MYTH CRITICISM: MYTH AND SCIENCE FICTION

University Complutense of Madrid, Spain: October 27-30, 2020

Myth and science fiction seek to explain the world, to answer everlasting questions: the origin of life and cause of death. But explanations are not sufficient for mankind: one wants to make approving or condemning judgements. Myth as well as science fiction project contradictions in unprecedented circumstances with an aim to adhere or condemn. Given the projective capacity of our imagination, we put forward improbable scenarios that allow us to see in a new light the consequences of a future situation.

Where does myth start and where does it end? How far does science fiction go? What significance does the crossing between both narratives have? As always, what is crucial and indisputable is to analyse the kind of transcendence in each case, the utmost criterion to identify and distinguish myth and science fiction.

In the last preceding conferences, organized by Asteria, International Association of Myth Criticism, in collaboration with Amaltea, Journal of Myth Criticism and ACIS, Research Group of Myth Criticism, we delved in the difficulties of adapting myths to our contemporary society, as well as their adaptations and subversions in the world of audiovisual creation.

The VI International Conference on Myth Criticism “Myth and Science Fiction” will analyze the relationship between myth and science fiction: their differences, convergences and subversions in various artistic fields. The temporal frame of the studies presented will span from 1900 to our contemporary time.

Send your proposals before May 1st.

Website: https://mythcriticism.com/en/

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November 2020

ANNUAL MEETING OF POSTGRADUATES IN RECEPTION OF THE ANCIENT WORLD (AMPRAW)

2020: TBA (annually, late November/early December): call for organizers (https://www.ru.nl/hlcs/conferences/ampraw-2019/call-organizers/) - deadline Feb 15

Previous AMPRAW conferences:
2019: Radboud University, Nijmegen (The Netherlands): November 28-30, 2019. https://www.ru.nl/hlcs/conferences/ampraw-2019/ampraw-2019/
2018: University of Coimbra, Portugal: November 8-​10 2018. https://ampraw2018.wixsite.com/home/.
2017: University of Edinburgh: 23-24 November 2017 - https://ampraw.wixsite.com/ampraw2017. Twitter: @ampraw2017
2016: University of Oxford: 12-13 December 2016 - https://amprawoxford.wordpress.com/
2015: University of Nottingham: 14-15 December 2015 - ampraw2015.wordpress.com/ - Twitter: @AMPRAW2015
2014: University of London: 24-25 November 2014 - ampraw2014.wordpress.com/.
2013: University of Exeter.
2012: University of Birmingham.
2011: University College London.

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December 2020

#CFP SENECA 2020. INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE. WHAT MORE CAN WE SAY ABOUT SENECA?

University of Lisbon, Portugal: December 14-17, 2020

The Centre for Classical Studies of the School of Arts and Humanities of the University of Lisbon is organizing an International Conference on Seneca to promote and encourage a critical reflection on the permanence of themes, values, perspectives and representations of Seneca's works in Western literature and culture.

The Conference will take place between 14-17 December 2020, and, through the interdisciplinary debate of the contribution given by the experiences of researchers from different fields of study, it aims:

- to think of how Seneca became one of the most prominent figures in Western culture;
- to consider, examine and reflect on our current knowledge about Seneca, his life and works;
- to explore new study angles and what remains to be said about Seneca in the Twenty-First Century, in light of the renewed interest shown in his works.

Confirmed Keynote Speakers:
António Pedro Mesquita (University of Lisbon)
Alessandro Schiesaro (University of Manchester)
Catharine Edwards (University of Cambridge)
Gareth David Williams (Columbia University)
Chiara Torre (University of Milan)
Jesús Luque Moreno (University of Granada)
José Pedro Serra (University of Lisbon)
Martha Nussbaum (University of Chicago)
Paulo Sérgio Ferreira (University of Coimbra)

For further information, please visit our website: https://sites.google.com/view/seneca2020/p%C3%A1gina-inicial

Call for papers closes: January 31, 2020.

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Seneca2020

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/scs-news/conference-seneca-2020

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2021

RECEPTION AND EMOTIONS

University of Western Australia, Perth: date TBA

ANZAMEMS (Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies) is pleased to announce that the location of the Thirteenth Biennial ANZAMEMS Conference in 2021 will be The University of Western Australia, in Perth, Western Australia! The conference convenor will be Dr Kirk Essary, and the conference topic will be 'Reception and Emotions.' More details will be announced. #anza21

Website: https://anzamems.org/

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January 2021

#CFP [SCS PANEL] CLASSICS IN/OUT OF ASIA

Annual Meeting of the Society for Classical Studies, Chicago IL, USA: January 7-10, 2021

Sponsored by the Asian and Asian American Classical Caucus

Organized by Kelly Nguyen (Brown University) and Christopher Waldo (Tulane University)

For our second workshop at the annual meeting of the Society for Classical Studies (SCS) in Chicago, IL (January 7-10, 2021), we invite abstracts for papers that explore, broadly, how Classics has moved through Asia. Following Claudia Moatti, we understand movement to be a “structural component of human experience and the human mind…[that] influences ways of thinking, relations of [people] to space, time, tradition, and the organization of societies…like an anamorphosis, movement modifies the perception of things and of human relations” (2006: 110). Building on this theoretical framework, we encourage papers that trace material, communication, and epistemological networks through transgeographical and/or transhistorical lenses. How have people, things, and ideas from Greco-Roman antiquity moved in and out of Asia? What are the effects on the lived experiences of those in the past as well as those in the present? How have texts, performances, and art (classical and contemporary) engaged with and imagined these movements and encounters?

We welcome all kinds of interpretations for our call for papers, not necessarily limited to scholarly papers. Examples include but are not limited to the following subdisciplines: visual art and performance studies, music, political activism, education, intellectual history, and literature. The AAACC is committed to fostering a collaborative and supportive environment for the sharing of innovative ideas; as such, we welcome scholars, educators, artists, and activists of all stages working on Asian and AAPI reception of Greco-Roman antiquity.

Abstracts of no more than 400 words should be sent as an email attachment to AAACCabstracts@gmail.com by Friday, March 6, 2020. Include the title of this panel as the subject line of your email. The text of your abstract should follow the guidelines on the SCS website and should not mention the name of the author (https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/guidelines-authors-abstracts). Abstracts will be evaluated anonymously by the panel organizers.

Works Cited: Moatti, Claudia. “Translation, Migration, and Communication in the Roman Empire: Three Aspects of Movement in History.” Classical Antiquity 25, no. 1 (2006): 109-140.

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/2021/152/classics-inout-asia

 

 

#CFP [SCS PANEL] NEW DIRECTIONS IN MEDIEVAL LATIN

Annual Meeting of the Society for Classical Studies, Chicago IL, USA: January 7-10, 2021

Organized by the Medieval Latin Studies Group

The Medieval Latin Studies Group invites proposals for a panel on “New Directions in Medieval Latin” to be held at the annual meeting of the Society for Classical Studies in Chicago (January 7–10, 2021). The organizers especially welcome proposals for papers that, for example, demonstrate new methodologies and approaches, consider the concept of “the new” in medieval Latin language and literature, examine uncanonical medieval Latin texts and materials, introduce new resources for the study of medieval Latin, or seek to understand the medieval period in new ways, as well as papers that consider the current and future relationship of medieval Latin to the field of Classics.

Abstracts for papers requiring no more than 20 minutes to deliver must be received by February 16, 2020 via email attachment to Bret Mulligan (Haverford College) at bmulliga@haverford.edu. Questions may also be directed to Bret Mulligan. All submissions will be reviewed anonymously and speakers will be notified no later than the end of March 2020. Abstracts must be anonymous and follow the instructions for the format of individual abstracts that appear on the SCS web site. Membership in the Medieval Latin Studies Group is not required to submit an abstract but all persons who submit abstracts must be SCS members in good standing.

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/2021/152/new-directions-medieval-latin

 

 

#CFP [SCS PANEL] OVID AND THE CONSTRUCTED VISUAL ENVIRONMENT

Annual Meeting of the Society for Classical Studies, Chicago IL, USA: January 7-10, 2021

The International Ovidian Society invites abstract submissions for a panel on Ovid and the Constructed Visual Environment, which it will sponsor at the 2021 Annual Meeting of the SCS in Chicago.

Throughout his works, Ovid persistently incorporates the activity of viewing as a poetic subject, and evokes his audience’s experience as viewers of art works, spectacles, and landscapes. For this panel we invite contributions that investigate the dialogue between Ovidian poetry and the visual arts from both sides: How might readers’ cultural training as spectators and viewers contribute to their understanding of Ovid’s texts, and how might readings of Ovid affect how various audiences respond to and populate their visual environment? While this is a familiar topic in Ovidian studies, it is also a fundamental one, and subject to repeated transformation through new approaches to the study of ancient art and performance.

The International Ovidian Society was formed in 2019 and holds the status of Affiliated Group of the SCS. Among the Society’s greatest purposes are to encourage future scholarship on Ovid, to support younger scholars and new work in Ovid, and to reach out beyond Classics to scholars in other fields, as well as to performers and artists, who do significant work related to Ovid and Ovidian reception.

Send questions to the co-organizers, Andrew Feldherr (feldherr@princeton.edu) and Teresa Ramsby (tramsby@umass.edu).

Please send an abstract for a 20-minute paper as an email attachment to lfulkerson@fsu.edu by March 1, 2020, listing the title of this panel as the subject line of the email. The text of the abstract should not mention the name of the author, but the email message should provide name, abstract title, and affiliation. Abstracts must be 650 words or fewer and follow the SCS guidelines for individual abstracts (https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/guidelines-authors-abstracts), but should include works cited at the end of the document, not in a separate text box. Submissions will be reviewed by third-party referees, who will make final selections by April 1.

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/2021/152/ovid-and-constructed-visual-environment

 

 

#CFP [SCS PANEL] RACE, CLASSICS, AND THE LATIN CLASSROOM

Annual Meeting of the Society for Classical Studies, Chicago IL, USA: January 7-10, 2021

Sponsored by the American Classical League and organized by Ronnie Ancona, Hunter College and CUNY Graduate Center, NY, NY, Editor of The Classical Outlook; and John Bracey, Belmont High School, Belmont, MA.

The American Classical League invites scholars and teachers to submit abstracts for its affiliated group panel session, "Race, Classics, and the Latin Classroom," at the Chicago Annual Meeting of the Society for Classical Studies in January 2021. We welcome abstracts that address one or more of the following topics:

1) How does one's approach to teaching Latin impact enrollment and retention of students of color?

2) How can post-secondary schools better meet the needs of increasingly diverse groups of students entering their classes?

3) How can K-12 and post-secondary school teachers collaborate to create a more inclusive and equitable progression through the levels of Latin?

4) How does whitewashing the ancient world alienate potential students of color?

All papers should be accessible to a broad audience of classics scholars and teachers. Papers accepted for the panel will be published in The Classical Outlook, journal of The American Classical League, after additional peer review. By submitting an abstract, you agree to submit your paper for publication in CO, if the abstract is chosen for the panel. Abstracts should be submitted to Ronnie Ancona (rancona@hunter.cuny.edu) only, since she will be anonymizing them before they are forwarded to those who will choose the successful abstracts. Please submit as a Word document. Any questions about the panel may be addressed to her. Abstracts should conform to the instructions for the format of individual abstracts that appear in the SCS Guidelines for Authors of Abstracts: https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/guidelines-authors-abstracts

Please put "ACL panel at SCS 2021" in the subject line of your email submission. Include the title of your paper, your name, and your institutional affiliation (or status as Independent Scholar) in the email message, but make sure that your name (and any other identifying information) does not appear in the abstract itself. If you refer to your own scholarship in your abstract, cite it in the third person, as you would any other source.

You MUST be a member of SCS to submit an abstract. Please include in your email submission message your SCS member number and the date you joined or last renewed. (This will appear on your membership confirmation email from SCS and in your account.) You DO NOT have to be a member of ACL.

The deadline for the submission of abstracts is January 25, 2020.

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/2021/152/race-classics-and-latin-classroom

 

 

#CFP [SCS PANEL] SUBVERTING THE CLASSICS IN THE EARLY MODERN AMERICAS

Annual Meeting of the Society for Classical Studies, Chicago IL, USA: January 7-10, 2021

Organizers: Matthew Gorey, Wabash College (mgorey6@gmail.com); Adriana Vazquez, University of California, Los Angeles (avazquez@humnet.ucla.edu)

As the field of Classics grapples with its historical exclusion of marginalized groups and perspectives, scholars have increasingly sought to complicate Euro-centric and colonial narratives of classical reception in the early modern period by highlighting moments of subversive engagement with classical antiquity. In the wake of various influential studies that explored anti-imperialist patterns of classical reception in early modern vernacular epics, there has been burgeoning interest in recent years in extending these modes of interpretation to the literatures of Latin America. This ongoing effort has shed light on diverse authors and texts that actively undermined, reclaimed, and reshaped the classical tradition in innovative ways. Such work often brings into focus historically marginalized readers and interpreters of antiquity and offers original and overlooked frames for approaching ancient literature and its role in the narratives of the colonial era.

This panel aims to showcase receptions of Greco-Roman antiquity that subvert the dominant narratives of those who used the classical past to champion elite culture and imperial conquest, with a focus on texts written in—or about—Latin America in the early modern period (ca. 1500 - 1800). Possible areas of inquiry include:

* moments of classical reception that suggest alternative or subversive readings of ancient texts.
* receptions of Greco-Roman antiquity by historically marginalized voices, by those who champion the cause of the oppressed, and by those who seek to decolonize, democratize, or deconstruct the legacy of the ancient past through disruptive and original engagement with ancient material.
* how Latin American authors adopted or adapted classical literature to negotiate their own ethnic, religious, or national identities, often in contradistinction to European models.
* the limits of subversive allusion, and texts that problematize particular aspects of classical imperialism while still subscribing to some broader imperial framework.

Our panel thus aims to solidify a new, competing reception narrative for the antique past in which authors in the early modern Americas—whether indigenous peoples, mestizos, or European colonists and travelers—engaged with classical texts to critique or subvert political and cultural authorities, using the ancient past as a negative model against which to develop new national literary traditions.

Please send an anonymous abstract for a 20-minute paper as an email attachment to info@classicalstudies.org, with the title “Subverting the Classics in the Early Modern Americas” in the subject line. The deadline for submissions is February 7, 2020. Submissions should follow the SCS guidelines for individual abstracts and will be reviewed by the organizers, who will make final selections by the end of March.

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/2021/152/subverting-classics-early-modern-americas

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February 2021

CATHARTIC HISTORY

University of West Georgia, Carrollton, GA, USA: February 25-27, 2021

The aim of this conference and the edited collection that will result is to propose Aristotelian catharsis as a new lens for historical inquiry. The project aims to do so, specifically, through the study of cathartic history as a phenomenon in the Greco-Roman Mediterranean and in the field of Classical history today. In the process, the project will serve as an example of the productive application of catharsis to the study of the past, and thus a model for other fields of historical research.

While the study of the past as a healing experience is not entirely new, no uniform vocabulary exists at this time for talking about cathartic history. Rather, scholars who have written to elicit an emotional response from their audiences about the past, or who have chosen to consider their own emotional response to the past, have largely done so in passing or in popularly oriented publications, rather than using that emotional response as a bona fide category of historical analysis in and of itself. And yet, the historian’s selection of topics of research, both in the ancient world and in the historical profession today, is often motivated by personal experiences, broadly defined. This project aims to show that thinking about the past as a cathartic experience whether for us as historians, and/or for the ancient historians we study, and/or for our modern audiences, provides a new bridge for a productive academic dialogue of the past with the present.

Proposals are invited for 20-minute papers that consider (but are not limited to) the following questions:

* How might we apply the Aristotelian theory of catharsis to Greek and Roman historians?
* In what ways might the lens of catharsis enrich our reading of narratives of trauma (whether personal or literary or national) in the ancient sources?
* Are we pursuing catharsis in our own research whenever we focus on topics of personal relevance?
* Is historical research a cathartic experience? Should it be?
* In what ways could thinking about history through the lens of catharsis intersect with the increased interest in social justice within the field of Classics?

Please submit abstracts of 300-500 words by November 12, 2019 to Nadya Williams, nwilliam@westga.edu

Call: https://classicalstudies.org/scs-news/cfp-cathartic-history

(CFP closed November 12, 2019)

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March 2021

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April 2021

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May 2021

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